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Thursday, 29 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Dell cocks a deaf ear to Linux at its online listening post

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Linux

The customer is always right. Except, of course, when he's wrong. Of late Dell has hit a bad patch. Thus was born IdeaStorm, Dell's effort to harness the collective intelligence of its actual and potential customers. Hordes of people signed up to volunteer their ideas. And that, of course, is where the trouble started.

Howto use katapult - The KDE Launcher on Steriods

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HowTos

katapult is an application launcher on steroids. Not only does it launch applications (like alt+f2 in kde), it also does incremental searching for applications and other files on your system, allowing you to launch things, or open files in just a few keystrokes. In addition, it can act as a calculator, and as a spell checker.

Book Review: Code Craft

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Reviews

Bookshop shelves groan under the weight of books promising to teach programming x, y or z in 21 days, 7 days, 24 hours, 10 minutes, 30 seconds… On the other hand, books devoted to the everyday craft of programming are far less common, particularly those that seek to impart the hard lessons gained from long experience churning out code in the real world. Peter Goodliffe's Code Craft is definitely in the latter camp.

What is Open Source? The Follow Up

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OSS

Like Matt, I thought I’d posted my final thoughts with respect to the open source debate, but his follow up to mine and others‘ entries is certainly deserving of a response.

KDE: K.I.S.S.

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KDE

Keep It Simple Stupid! That's the fundamental principle I'm applying to Kassie. I removed all unnecessary dialogs asking "Do you want to do that?" I found only two cases where such a dialog is useful.

E17 — Desktop Enlightenment

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Software

The performance of desktop computers increases year by year. This gives the programmers great opportunities to further improve the desktop experience of the users. However, what should you do when you have an old computer that is not capable of running the latest and hottest software? Let me introduce you Enlightenment E17 — the window manager with minimal hardware requirements that may amaze you.

WordPress server hacked, downloads rigged with serious flaw

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Security

An unknown cracker broke into a server hosting downloads of the popular WordPress blogging software and rigged the file with a remotely exploitable code execution vulnerability. If you downloaded WordPress 2.1.1 within the past 3-4 days, your files may include a security exploit that was added by a cracker.

Where Open Source Developers Shine

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OSS

In January I reviewed Vector Linux 5.8. While the review was mainly positive I did complain about what I saw as some faults in the distribution. The response from the developers of Vector Linux was almost immediate, both in the Vector Linux forum and in the comments under my reviews, and was incredibly positive.

What you should know about switching to Ubuntu from Windows

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Ubuntu

Are you ready to take the plunge? It can be hard to decide, particularly if you’re a longtime Windows user. Here’s a truthful look at some of the issues you will be faced with if you decide to switch.

User-Friendly Linux

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Linux

Red Hat, Novell and Oracle are scrapping for your Linux support dollars. But could you save big by going it alone? As Linux becomes easier to use and gains big-name vendor support, we assess available options for fitting the OS into your organization.

The Next Round Of Microsoft Vs. Linux: Health Care

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OS

An industry that has long resisted IT automation got a double dose of medicine last week. Both Microsoft and backers of key open source initiatives laid out plans to push IT further into health care--plans that also put the Windows and Linux camps on another collision course.

Fedora 7 KVM Virtualization How-To

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HowTos

Fedora 7 is still under heavy development, but premiering with Test 2 were improvements to libvirt and virt-manager. Libvirt and virt-manager originally were introduced with Fedora Core 5 to offer improved management and interaction with Xen. However, additions to libvirt and virt-manager now make it possible to use QEMU or KVM through this toolkit and virtual machine manager. While the steps are now similar to setting up a Xen-virtualized operating system with Fedora, in this article we will be covering the steps needed as well as some of our thoughts and what we ran into when virtualizing a few different operating systems.

Single Packet Authorization

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HowTos

Vulnerabilities have been discovered in all sorts of security software from firewalls to implementations of the Secure Shell (SSH) Protocol. opers in the world, and yet it occasionally contains a remotely exploitable vulnerability. This is an important fact to note because it seems to indicate that security is hard to achieve. This article explores the concept of Single Packet Authorization (SPA) as a next-generation passive authentication technology beyond port knocking.

When is a standard not a standard?

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Microsoft

I had a massive argument with my brother the other day over an IT issue close to my heart. What he was saying was that he, and the entire metropolitan police force, use Microsoft Word. He said they had "standardized" on Microsoft Office formats and did not see a problem with that.

Why freedom matters (and how to define it)

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OSS

An open source company is one that, as its core revenue-generating business, actively produces, distributes, and sells (or sells services around) software under an OSI-approved license.

Aaron J. Seigo: dolphin gets a treeview, krunner gets prettier

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KDE

peter penz committed a treeview for dolphin to svn today. in more happy news, krunner is getting prettier with transparency on the widgets, pretty buttons and the listview soon to be replaced by the "icon parade".

Quick Cruise Around Fedora 7 Test 2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

Fedora 7 test 2 was announced yesterday and since they now put out livecds as well as their install images, I thought I'd take it for a little test drive. Fedora's always been a bit neglected around here, but there are good reasons for that. Honestly, I've never been a big Red Hat fan and Anaconda discriminating against my hard drives didn't help. So, Fedora being delivered in a livecd format gives Tuxmachines a welcomed opportunity to test it.

Blame Dell or Help Them?

Filed under
Linux

There is much anger and disappointment in the community this week, regarding the seemingly near-miss of a major U.S. hardware vendor finally announcing that they would pre-install Linux on their machines, only to turn around the next day that they were not pre-installing. Except that's not the way it happened. At all.

Money or nothing? Trade-offs in FOSS compensation

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OSS

What happens when a free and open source software (FOSS) project attempts to introduce compensation for its developers? Because FOSS remains based largely on volunteer work, many worry that payment might demotivate both those who receive it and those who do not. However, community leaders who have observed how payment interacts with the FOSS ethos suggest a more complicated picture.

Novell Loss Alarms Investors

Filed under
SUSE

Novell told investors Friday that preliminary results for the first quarter indicate that the networking software concern swung to a loss. The Waltham, Mass.-based company said it was confident that it remained on track for profitability, but traders and analysts weren't willing to wait around to see if those predictions panned out.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.10 Doesn't Change Much With Performance, Clear Linux Still Leads In Most Tests

Given yesterday's Ubuntu 16.10 final beta release ahead of the official "Yakkety Yak" debut in two weeks, I decided to run some benchmarks of Ubuntu 16.10 compared to Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS on the same system plus also throwing in the Intel Clear Linux distribution given it tends to be one of the most performant. For those that haven't yet tried out Ubuntu 16.10 nor followed its development, GCC 6.2 is now the default compiler in place of GCC 5.4 from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Mesa 12.0.3 provides the stock graphics drivers and Linux 4.8 is the stock kernel. Read more Also: DDR4 Memory Speed Tests With The Core i7 6800K On Ubuntu Linux

Mozilla's Rust 1.12

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    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.12. Rust is a systems programming language with the slogan “fast, reliable, productive: pick three.” As always, you can install Rust 1.12 from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.12 on GitHub. 1361 patches were landed in this release.
  • Rust 1.12 Programming Language Released
    Rust 1.12 has been released as the newest version of this popular programming language with a focus on "fast, reliable, productive: pick three."

Linux Devices

  • Raspberry Pi Foundation Unveils New LXDE-Based Desktop for Raspbian Called PIXEL
    Today, September 28, 2016, Raspberry Pi Foundation's Simon Long proudly unveiled a new desktop environment for the Debian-based Raspbian GNU/Linux operating system for Raspberry Pi devices. Until today, Raspbian shiped with the well-known and lightweight LXDE desktop environment, which looks pretty much the same as on any other Linux-based distribution out there that is built around LXDE (Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment). But Simon Long, a UX engineer working for Raspberry Pi Foundation was hired to make it better, transform it into something that's more appealing to users.
  • MintBox Mini updated with faster AMD SoC and 8GB RAM
    CompuLab’s Linux Mint flavored MintBox Mini Pro mini-PC updates the Mini with an AMD A10 Micro-6700T, plus BT 4.0, mini-PCIe, and twice the RAM and storage. The CompuLab built, $395 MintBox Mini Pro, which ships with the Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon distribution, updates the $295 MintBox Mini with a lot more performance and features in the same compact 108 x 83 x 24mm footprint. That’s considerably smaller than earlier collaborations between CompuLab and the Linux Mint project, such as the circa-2013 MintBox 2.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro
    MintBox Mini Pro The new model is called “Mintbox Mini Pro”, it’s just as small as the original Mintbox Mini but with much better specifications.

4 of the Best Linux Distros for Windows Users

For the past year Microsoft has offered free upgrades to their latest operating system, Windows 10. This was mainly due to the fact that Windows 8 and 8.1 were poorly received, especially when compared to Windows 7. Unfortunately the free upgrade period has passed, so if you want to give Windows 10 a try, you’ll have to dig into your wallet to do it. If your faith in the tech giant has waned over the years, you’re not alone. The latest versions of Windows have all been heavily criticized, proving that they have been a far cry from the world dominance of Windows XP. If you’re one of the many people turned off by the latest iterations of Windows, the jump to Linux might look very appealing. Unfortunately, a new OS often comes with a steep learning curve. Windows, with the exception of the fumble that was 8, has more or less looked and behaved the same for years. Having to re-learn everything can be a daunting task, one that could pressure you into staying with Windows forever. However, you do have options. There are many different distributions of Linux out there, with some aiming to replicate the look and feel of Windows. The goal of this is to make transitioning relatively painless. With Linux boasting improved hardware support, long term stability and a wider range of software applications, there is no better time to try it out! Read more Related (Microsoft exodus): Microsoft Applications and Services chief Qi Lu leaves the company<