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Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Story 514cKW4r3 1337 R313453d - 700 (00L Ph0R 5(|-|00L srlinuxx 1 29/04/2011 - 5:58am
Story 10 Must-Have Free Firefox 4 Add-Ons srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 5:24am
Story 3 Best Sticky Notes Apps For Linux srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 5:22am
Story Ubuntu 11.04: To Upgrade or Not to Upgrade? srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 5:20am
Story Why systemd? srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 1:50am
Story Natty Narwahl: Ubuntu marine mammal not fully evolved srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 1:49am
Story Did You Know You Can Try BSD With VirtualBSD? srlinuxx 29/04/2011 - 1:47am
Story User experience, one pixel at a time srlinuxx 28/04/2011 - 10:28pm
Story 4 Great Plugins For Easy Installation In Linux srlinuxx 28/04/2011 - 10:26pm
Story A Primer on Unity srlinuxx 28/04/2011 - 10:15pm

Open Document Format published as ISO standard

Filed under
OSS

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) finally published the Open Document Format (ODF) as an official standard last week after approving it as an international standard last May. The ODF file format is the XML-based open format for text, spreadsheet, database, and presentation files.

Novell "Forking" OpenOffice.org

Filed under
SUSE

Well, if there are any Novell supporters left, here's something else to put in your pipe and smoke it. Novell is forking OpenOffice.org.

Layoffs at OSDL?

Filed under
OSS

Sources said the OSDL—the sponsor of Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux kernel, and other key developers—on Dec. 4 laid off a sizable portion of its engineering staff in a move that the sources said left the OSDL's Beaverton, Ore., offices a "ghost town."

Ulteo Newsletter #1 states 1st livecd Dec 5/6

Filed under
Linux

This is not yet a real newsletter, but this should be considered the first issue of the Ulteo Newsletter anyhow...

First of all, we'd like to express a big public thank you to everyone who has showed their support to Ulteo. This has been absolutely awesome!

So what has happened for all these months, and why aren't any Ulteo products available to the public?

aKademy 2006 Review and Videos

Filed under
KDE

Linux Magazine have put their overview of aKademy 2006 -- the KDE World Conference -- online from their December 2006 issue. They describe how aKademy helped plan the road to KDE 4, and also report on the widely-successful OpenDocument day. There is also a review of KAlarm available from the same issue. In other aKademy 2006 news, the videos of the presentations and talks are now being uploaded.

Build a PC dedicated for HD DVD Playback

Filed under
HowTos

I set about building a PC dedicated to playing the HD movie clips and used the Demo PC as a guide. The minimum specification was based on the demo and works with video only but has trouble with audio. My OS is based on the SLAX Standard Edition v 5.1.8.1.

GIMP User Manual 0.11 Released

Filed under
Software

We're proud to announce a new release of the user manual for GIMP 2.2. This release features a lot of fixed and new content, in particular:

FlightGear takes off

Filed under
Gaming

FlightGear is a multiplatform, GPLed flight simulator. It is sophisticated, realistic, and extensible. You can choose to fly more than 100 different aircraft, ranging from a Sopwith Camel to a UFO, you can take off and land from thousands of airports, and you can fly over virtually any terrain in the world. After 10 years of development, it has suddenly become a very hot item. How hot? You may have seen it used recently on prime time TV and not realized it. It was used in an episode of Fox TV's legal drama Justice to prove pilot error in the fatal crash of a private plane.

Quicktip - How to share folders in Ubuntu with ease

Filed under
HowTos

Got a folder in Ubuntu that you’d like to share? Now you can do it with ease. Right click on the folder, and choose Share Folder. More Here.

Install and Use the gFTP Client on Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Using ftp from the command line can get tedious after a while. There’s a client for Ubuntu called gFTP that gives you a GUI based ftp experience. Much easier.

Network interface operations for IPv4 and IPv6 on AIX version 5.3

Filed under
Linux

This article is for developers on AIX® Version 5.3 with an interest in network-level operations for both Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) and the Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) stack. Learn more about the socket I/O control (ioctl) commands and how to use them to perform various network-related operations.

Linux Isn't Just For Grownups Anymore

Filed under
Linux

It looks like the education space could be the first, real place where Linux could grab beachhead in the desktop PC market. Take a look at Indiana, for example. In about a year State of Indiana education officials have moved at least 22,000 students from Windows-based desktops to Linux-based desktops. I wanted to find out for myself so I put Linux to the test with the two most demanding public school students I know -- my own kids.

The Tao Of Linux

Filed under
Linux

Free of the hustle of the daily work life, Nat Friedman meditated in a Californian Buddhist monastery, clearing his mind of worldly clutter. For 10 days, he opened his consciousness to new ideas, new ways of thinking and new realms of possibility. No code. No e-mails. No meetings. No deadlines or work orders. Just simple serenity.

Ubuntu Networking for Basic and Advanced Users

Filed under
HowTos

The basics for any network based on *nix hosts is the Transport Control Protocol/ Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) combination of three protocols. This combination consists of the Internet Protocol (IP),Transport Control Protocol (TCP), and Universal Datagram Protocol (UDP).

Mysterious lockups

Filed under
Linux

Of all computer problems, the unresponsive hang is the most annoying and most difficult to trace. There's no crash, no panic: everything just stops dead. The keyboard is useless, telnets just time out - you have no choice but to power cycle the machine.

Running Kubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

About a month ago I first installed Kubuntu Dapper Drake (6.06) on one of my home office machines. I really liked it. Last week, I decided to ditch the old version of Mandriva I've been running for about 18 months on my primary machine, a Toshiba laptop, and give Kubuntu a try there too. This time using the latest version, 6.10, otherwise known as Edgy Eft.

Ubuntu Linux Is an Ideal Windows Replacement

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Having been raised on DOS and the early generations of Windows, I rediscovered that sense of excitement in a pure computing experience when I first tried other Linux versions over the years. However, they required a steep learning curve and caused too much frustration with setup and obscure command-line options. Not so with Ubuntu Linux.

Novell, FOSS activists go head-to-head

Filed under
SUSE

The growing fallout over the Novell-Microsoft deal has prompted Novell to roll out its big guns for the first face-to-face debate on the merits of the deal and the implications for the free software community.

Good and Bad in XFCE

Filed under
Software

Since XFCE 4.4 will not no longer be able to advertise its low system requirements, I suppose we're entitled to expect more of it, right? There is an "official" Xfce Wish List, but here are my own annoyances with Xfce.

Jono Bacon: Post Ubuntu Open Week Shazaa

Filed under
Ubuntu

My friend and yours, AusImage, has tidied up the Ubuntu Open Week logs into this nice collection of formatted logs. There is some incredible content, help and tips in there about all aspects of contributing to Ubuntu.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

Android Leftovers

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Apache Graduates Another Big Data Project to Top Level
    For the past year, we've taken note of the many projects that the Apache Software Foundation has been elevating to Top-Level Status. The organization incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, and has squarely turned its focus to Big Data and developer-focused tools in recent months. As Apache moves Big Data projects to Top-Level Status, they gain valuable community support. Only days ago, the foundation announced that Apache Kudu has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). Kudu is an open source columnar storage engine built for the Apache Hadoop ecosystem designed to enable flexible, high-performance analytic pipelines. And now, Apache Twill has graduated as well. Twill is an abstraction over Apache Hadoop YARN that reduces the complexity of developing distributed Hadoop applications, allowing developers to focus more on their application logic.
  • Spark 2.0 takes an all-in-one approach to big data
    Apache Spark, the in-memory processing system that's fast become a centerpiece of modern big data frameworks, has officially released its long-awaited version 2.0. Aside from some major usability and performance improvements, Spark 2.0's mission is to become a total solution for streaming and real-time data. This comes as a number of other projects -- including others from the Apache Foundation -- provide their own ways to boost real-time and in-memory processing.
  • Why Uber Engineering Switched from Postgres to MySQL
    The early architecture of Uber consisted of a monolithic backend application written in Python that used Postgres for data persistence. Since that time, the architecture of Uber has changed significantly, to a model of microservices and new data platforms. Specifically, in many of the cases where we previously used Postgres, we now use Schemaless, a novel database sharding layer built on top of MySQL. In this article, we’ll explore some of the drawbacks we found with Postgres and explain the decision to build Schemaless and other backend services on top of MySQL.
  • GNU Hyperbole 6.0.1 for Emacs 24.4 to 25 is released
    GNU Hyperbole (pronounced Ga-new Hi-per-bo-lee), or just Hyperbole, is an amazing programmable hypertextual information management system implemented as a GNU Emacs package. This is the first public release in 2016. Hyperbole has been greatly expanded and modernized for use with the latest Emacs 25 releases; it supports GNU Emacs 24.4 or above. It contains an extensive set of improvements that can greatly boost your day-to-day productivity with Emacs and your ability to manage information stored across many different machines on the internet. People who get used to Hyperbole find it helps them so much that they prefer never to use Emacs without it.
  • Belgium mulls reuse of banking mobile eID app
    The Belgium government wants to reuse ‘Belgian Mobile ID’ a smartphone app for electronic identification, developed by banks and telecom providers in the country. The eID app could be used for eGovernment services, and the federal IT service agency, Fedict, is working on the app’s integration.
  • Water resilience that flows: Open source technologies keep an eye on the water flow
    Communities around the world are familiar with the devastation brought on by floods and droughts. Scientists are concerned that, in light of global climate change, these events will only become more frequent and intense. Water variability, at its worst, can threaten the lives and well-beings of countless people. Sadly, humans cannot control the weather to protect themselves. But according to Silja Hund, a researcher at the University of British Columbia, communities can build resilience to water resource stress. Hund studies the occurrence and behavior of water. In particular, she studies rivers and streams. These have features (like water volume) that can change quickly. According to Hund, it is essential for communities to understand local water systems. Knowledge of water resources is helpful in developing effective water strategies. And one of the best ways to understand dynamic water bodies like rivers is to collect lots of data.

Development News

  • JavaScript keeps its spot atop programming language rankings
    U.K.-based technology analyst firm RedMonk just released the latest version of its biannual rankings of programming languages, and once again JavaScript tops the list, followed by Java and PHP. Those are same three languages that topped RedMonk’s list in January. In fact, the entire top 10 remains the same as it was it was six months ago. Perhaps the biggest surprise in Redmonk’s list—compiling the “performance of programming languages relative to one another on GitHub and Stack Overflow”—is that there are so few surprises, at least in the top 10.
  • Plenty of fish in the C, IEEE finds in language popularity contest
    It's no surprise that C and Java share the top two spots in the IEEE Spectrum's latest Interactive Top Programming Languages survey, but R at number five? That's a surprise. This month's raking from TIOBE put Java at number one and C at number two, while the IEEE reverses those two, and the IEEE doesn't rank assembly as a top-ten language like TIOBE does. It's worth noting however that the IEEE's sources are extremely diverse: the index comprises search results from Google, Twitter, GitHub, StackOverflow, Reddit, Hacker News, CareerBuilder, Dice, and the institute's own eXplore Digital Library. Even then, there are some oddities in the 48 programming environments assessed: several commenters to the index have already remarked that “Arduino” shouldn't be considered a language, because code for the teeny breadboard is written in C or C++.