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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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openSUSE Build Service goes Open Source

Filed under
SUSE

The openSUSE team announced today the open sourcing of our openSUSE Build Service (OBS). We believe that it is not only important to release an excellent Open Source distribution but also create it in an open way with Open Source tools together with the openSUSE community. Releasing the build service as Open Source makes the complete project build on Open Source.

Automatic package update nagging with apticron

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HowTos

Do you need your machines to automatically alert you when new packages are available? apticron might be just the package you've been looking for.

What is this ar program thingy?

Filed under
HowTos

Travelling through the mysterious and wonderful world of the linux file system we come across a program called "ar" and we think to ourselves, "What is this 'ar' program thingy?". It sounds like a pirates exclamation but it is actually a very important program.

The State of the Union of FOSS

Filed under
OSS

Confidential White House sources have leaked to me a secretly included draft section of the President’s State of the Union address. These sources suspect that the Free Software Foundation (FSF), a suspected terrorist group, somehow gained access to the speech and included this section. It was purportedly caught at the last moment by a staffer who was literate enough to understand what she was reading. I release this copy of the rejected section, exposing myself to potentially grave peril, as a public service to our readers.

Linux Audio Players, Tested and Graded

Filed under
Software

One longstanding Unix tradition is best summed up thus: "Write programs that do one thing and do it well. Write programs to work together." On a Linux machine, this philosophy is most clearly visible from the command line. I use my main Linux desktop for a lot of things, but music-related activities are key. While visiting my family back home, I encountered Windows Media Player 11 and Apple's iTunes. I began to wonder if there were an all-in-one music application for Linux that I could love.

How not to release a live DVD game

Filed under
Linux

I was intrigued when I heard about SuperGamer, a beta live DVD based on PCLinuxOS. The DVD includes, in demo version for the most part, 3-D shooters America's Army, Doom 3, Postal 2, Cube, Enemy Territory, Nexuiz, Quake 4, Soldier of Fortune, UFO: Alien Invasion, and Wesnoth. Unfortunately, my SuperGamer/PCLinuxOS experience was as bad a Linux experience as I can remember having.

Sauerbraten - Cube 2 Based Free Multiplayer First Person Shooter

Filed under
Gaming

Sauerbraten is a popular free and open source computer game for Linux. It is a "First Person Shooter" game, that is, when you play it you see the world of the game from the perspective of the character that you control, giving you the impression of moving in the 3-dimensional space created by the game. The main activity of this character is running around in a fantastic world and shooting enemies or evil creatures.

War of words between aid organization and OLPC erupts

Filed under
OLPC

A war of words has erupted through email channels between Scandinavian-based aid organization FAIR and Dr Nicholas Negroponte of the One Latop Per Child (OLPC) project.

Tips and Tricks for Linux Admins: The State of the Tiny

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

There is a distinct sub-culture in the Unix-type operating universe made up of gnarly old geekbeards who were raised up in the green-screen command-prompt era. They think X Window is for amateurs. These are the wizened gurus who take pride at keeping antique hardware in service. Throw away an old 386 or 486? Never. Me, I have a life. So let's take a look at some of the small form-factor devices that we can stuff Linux into.

Kernel Space: State of the Nouveau project

Filed under
Software

While NVidia refuses to release programming information for its video chipsets, one ambitious project is reverse engineering the hardware to develop open source support.

Control machines with your machine

Filed under
HowTos

This article is intended for new Linux users who wish to use their Linux-box for some real work. Speed control of an industrial motor? Sounds complicated? It’s not as complex an affair as it sounds. What’s interesting is that a PC powered with a Linux based Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) can be used to control anything from a small motor to a complex industrial drive with the utmost reliability.

5 Tips to Install Ubuntu From Windows

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HowTos

A great new prototype had been making the front page of a lot of publication recently. All the fuzz is about the new Ubuntu installer Windows based installer for Ubuntu. What’s the catch? The news was so over the place and the installer in such a bad shape that a lot of people could be discouraged.

The Road to KDE 4: Job Progress Reimagined

Filed under
KDE

Have you ever had your taskbar filled with 10 applications all doing something that involved waiting for a task to finish? Document Printing Progress, a K3b CD burning dialogue, Audio Encoding via KAudioCreator, File Transfers in Konqueror, Kopete, KTorrent, checking email in KMail... The new Jobs support in KDE 4 will unify the display of progress for these tasks, making it easy to see and manage what is happening on your system.

Tip of the Trade: apt-proxy

Filed under
HowTos

If you're running more than one Debian or Ubuntu computer on your network, you can speed up downloads and updates considerably by using a local package mirror. Packages need only be downloaded once to be available to all of your local clients.

The Open Source Initiative still lives

Filed under
OSS

There was a time when the OSI (Open Source Initiative) was one of the hotbeds of open source activity. After the retirement of its co-founder and leader, Eric S. Raymond, in January 2005, the OSI lost much of its fire. That may be changing soon, though.

Small businesses are ripe for free software

Filed under
OSS

Once upon a time, in a career far, far away, I worked for a very small business. I was tasked with upgrading the OLD PC’s. The budget was so miniscule that literally every penny counted. In the effort to get the best bang for the buck, I stumbled across these programs called free software. “Whoo-hoo, they’re free” I thought. Little knowing how that introduction to free software applications would change my life.

OpenOffice, Office 2007 get new tools

Filed under
OOo

Rivals Microsoft Corp. and OpenOffice.org on Tuesday both released toolkits that support building applications for their competing document file formats and productivity suites.

OpenOffice.org's toolkit allows developers to add the ability to save documents in Open Document Format for Office Applications (ODF) to a variety of applications.

OLPC: yet another bad idea

Filed under
OLPC

There are plenty of misguided projects which people in the West undertake, under the mistaken impression that they are helping those in the underdeveloped regions of the world.

The One Laptop Per Child initiative, a brainwave of MIT's Nicholas Negroponte, is just the latest in a long line. When you throw in fancy phrases like "bridging the digital divide" the publicity is ensured.

Take action or execute a command based upon shell script name

Filed under
HowTos

You would like to run different commands or task based upon a single shell script name. For example script name is backup Instead of writing 3 different script write one script and softlink using ln command:

Open Source support hooks a fallacy says Linux expert

Filed under
OSS

A leading US Open Source expert and 25-year veteran of the Free Software community has rejected claims from major software companies warning of hidden costs associated with the technology.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box