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Friday, 22 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

KDE 4.2 brings the MySQL server to the desktop

Filed under
KDE

bytebot.net/blog: If you’re using Fedora 10, and are a KDE desktop user, you’ll notice that your latest KDE 4.2 update, requires having a local MySQL server installed.

Commercial Linux Distro Support Shootout

Filed under
Linux

serverwatch.com: Money can't buy you love; nor can it buy you happiness. But it just might bring you peace of mind. The Big 3 commercial Linux vendors; Canonical, Novell and Red Hat are ready to serve you through support subscription services for your Linux infrastructure.

Why the gOS Could Now Hurt Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

crn.com: Good OS, the Taipei, Taiwan-based company that launched in 2007, could turn out to be bad news for Microsoft.

Goo Blimey, It's "Awesome"

Filed under
Gaming

reddevil62-techhead: MY nine-year-old son bellowed: "This is awesome.. world class!" I was hooting with laughter. The source of this merriment? A game.

The Perfect Server - Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) [ISPConfig 2]

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a Debian Lenny (Debian 5.0) server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable), Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Courier POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Open source traits lead to secure applications

  • Linux Tool Resurrects Deleted Images
  • Is Firefox really that bad?
  • Linux basics: Picking a distribution
  • World of Goo for Linux
  • Ubuntu's Shuttleworth Opens Up
  • The statist approach to open source
  • New KWin effect: Sheet
  • Novell: Five Goals for Feb. 26 Earnings Announcement
  • Let's Use Stimulus to Boost Open Source in Schools
  • WiFi-centric dual-mode Linux phone rev'd
  • New installation DVDs for Fedora
  • 6 Resources for the Powerful Drupal Content Management System
  • The boot-up showdown
  • Five reasons why the economic slowdown is good news for open source
  • Freescale promises $200 netbook
  • Linux Haters Make a Few Valid Points
  • Simplicity-money combo spells MySQL success
  • Linux Basement Episode 36 - Interview With Brandon
  • Linux Void Episode 21 - Super Nova

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Per-Process Namespaces

  • Duplicate your Ubuntu Installation....
  • Fast access to frequently used directories
  • How Linux Shuts Down
  • bash completion: /dev/fd/62: No such file or directory
  • Adding Custom Shortcuts to Gnome
  • How to resolve the ‘/bin/rm: Argument list too long’ error
  • Extract the MP3 Audio Portion of a Video

Novell MD on getting along with Microsoft

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

news.zdnet.co.uk: The company signed a deal with Microsoft in 2006 to collaborate over sales and to license patents Microsoft claims to hold over Linux. ZDNet UK caught up with McCarry to discuss the relationship with Microsoft and Novell's strategy for working with the technology company.

5 types of company open source relationships

Filed under
OSS

stormyscorner.com: First off, there is no ideal company/community relationship. There are lots of different types of relationships between companies and the communities they work with (or don't work with) - and no one way is perfect for everyone.

Microsoft's biggest threat: Linux

community.zdnet: I get to hear about the biggest threat to Microsoft's hegemony and market dominance quite a bit. It often goes something like this: "Linux isn't Microsoft's biggest threat, Google is."

Test Center Analysis: Playing the Netbook OS Game

crn.com: There's one major decision that hits potential netbook buyers right up front: if the netbook is the system of choice, do they want a system based on Microsoft Windows XP Home or would they rather go the open-source route with a netbook based on Linux?

New project was born: halrv

Filed under
Software

rg03.wordpress: Some days ago I started a new small project called halrv. It is a very simple Python script that allows you to manage removable volumes from the command line using HAL.

Debian Lenny Mini Review

Filed under
Linux

technichristian.net: Having always been a Debian person at heart, I eagerly awaited the latest Debian version to hit the mirrors. When Lenny was released, I downloaded the DVD ISO through torrent and installed it.

When will enterprises contribute to open source?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: When will enterprises get serious about contributing to open source projects run by others?

HOW TO: Introduce Ubuntu into your workplace

Filed under
Ubuntu

refresh.co.za: Having worked with the system a bit here and there, and now for a few hours today, I’ve truly seen the power and potential of using an Ubuntu system.

Linux’s Greatest Strength: No One Uses It

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: An Ubuntu user published a piece on his blog last week about using .desktop files to deliver malware under Gnome and KDE. But in a world where Linux market share remains negligible, do these flaws translate to a decline in the actual (rather than theoretical) security of a desktop Linux system?

"Linux 101 Hacks" Available as Free Download

ostatic.com/blog: Ramesh Natarajan is giving out free copies of his ebook, Linux 101 Hacks. Though it targets a more experienced audience than the Ubuntu Pocket Guide and Reference download Sam covered last month, it looks like a handy reference.

Gutenberg books with GNU/Linux - Part 1

Filed under
Linux

I am a great fan of the Gutenberg project, a noteworthy and honorable effort to digitize copyright-free texts. This project has released into the public domain over 20,000 classic books. This article will explain how to integrate this huge body of material with the Ubuntu desktop.

Around the Web: Samba - The Interoperability Dance

Filed under
Software

tuxdeluxe.org: People have always made music. Once human beings had computers available, software became just like music. People create software the same way they create music. They really do. You don't do it because you get paid for it. You do it because it's fun. Samba is the equivalent of a garage band that made it big.

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today's howtos

KDE/Qt: Qt Contributor Summit 2018, Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt, FreeBSD, and Konsole

  • Qt Contributor Summit 2018
    One bit especially interesting is the graphics stack. Back in Qt 5.0, Qt took the liberty of limiting the graphics stack to OpenGL, but the world has changed since: On Windows the only proper stack is Direct3D 12, Apple introduced Metal and recently deprecated OpenGL and Vulkan is coming rather strong. It looks like embracing these systems transparently will be one of the most exciting tasks to achieve. From a KDE & Plasma perspective I don’t think this is scary, OpenGL is here to stay on Linux. We will get a Framework based on a more flexible base and we can continue pushing Plasma, Wayland, Plasma Mobile with confidence that the world won’t be crumbling. And with a bit of luck, if we want some parts to use Vulkan, we’ll have it properly abstracted already.
  • Integrating Cloud Solutions with Qt
    These days, using the cloud for predictive maintenance, analytics or feature updates is a de facto standard in the automation space. Basically, any newly designed product has some server communication at its core. However, the majority of solutions in the field were designed and productized when communication technology was not at today’s level. Still, attempts are being made to attach connectivity to such solutions. The mission statement is to “cloudify” an existing solution, which uses some internal protocol or infrastructure.
  • KDE on FreeBSD – June 2018
    It’s been a while since I wrote about KDE on FreeBSD, what with Calamares and third-party software happening as well. We’re better at keeping the IRC topic up-to-date than a lot of other sources of information (e.g. the FreeBSD quarterly reports, or the f.k.o website, which I’ll just dash off and update after writing this).
  • Konsole’s search tool
    Following my konsole’s experiments from the past week I came here to show something that I’m working on with the VDG, This is the current Konsole’s Search Bar. [...] I started to fix all of those bugs and discovered that most of them happened because we had *one* search bar that was shared between every terminal view, and whenever a terminal was activated we would reposition, reparent, repaint, disconnect, reconnect the search bar. Easiest solution: Each Terminal has it’s own search bar. Setuped only once. The one bug I did not fix was the Opening / Closing one as the searchbar is inside of a layout and layouts would reposition things anyway. All of the above bugs got squashed by just moving it to TerminalDisplay, and the code got also much cleaner as there’s no need to manual intervention in many cases. On the review Kurt – the Konsole maintainer – asked me if I could try to make the Search prettier and as an overlay on top of the Terminal so it would not reposition things when being displayed.

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments. Until now, The Document Foundation only recommended the LibreOffice 6.0 office suite to bleeding-edge users while urging enterprises and mainstream users to use the well-tested LibreOffice LibreOffice 5.4 series, which reached end of life on June 11, 2018, with the last point release, LibreOffice 5.4.7. Read more

LibreOffice 6.0 Is Now Ready for Mainstream Users and Enterprise Deployments

The Document Foundation informed Softpedia today about the general availability of the fifth point release of the LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite for all supported operating systems. LibreOffice 6.0.5 is here one and a half months after the LibreOffice 6.0.4 point release to mark the open-source office suite as ready for mainstream users and enterprise deployments. The Document Foundation considers that LibreOffice 6.0 has been tested thoroughly and that it's now ready for use in production, enterprise environments. Read more Direct: The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.0.5