Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Make Firefox full screen even better with Fullerscreen

Filed under

Fullerscreen is an extension that gives Web pages in Firefox the full run of your monitor. If you spend much time using Web-based applications like Gmail, Google Notebook, or Backpack, Fullerscreen is a must-have addition to Firefox.

Nine things you don’t know about Novell

Filed under

If you’re a long-time NetWare user, you might think you know everything Novell-ish. However, the company looks a lot different these days than it used to, now that it is focused on Linux and is claiming customers who never used NetWare. So for those who remember NetWare fondly -- as well as those who wouldn’t know NetWare from OS/2 -- here are nine things we bet you don't know about Novell.

AES encryptions with Kerberos 5

Filed under

You can use Kerberos to verify the identities of users and principals over networks.

Linux for Clinics Alpha Release

Filed under

Linux for Clinics has released a Alpha testing release. Known issues... 1. Ubiquity icon is from Ubuntu 2. Initial boot screen on Livecd is still Ubuntu 3. Forgot to remove Gnome-Games 4. Forgot to install the medical dictionary for 5. No LFC upgrade path...Have not implemented our repository yet.

The Aims of the Linux For Clinics Project

Grandfather clause ticks off Linux set

Filed under

A GPL provision to prevent Novell/Microsoft-type agreements may not pacify the open-source community

The latest draft of the GNU General Public Licence (GPL) has caused more ructions in the Linux community.

Fun with Feisty

Filed under

As I promised in my previous post I’ll report here on my experiences with the freshly installed Xubuntu Feisty Fawn. Though I’ll note the changes mentioned on other reviews, but I’ll also try to add changes that aren’t that apparent and that you haven’t read about elsewhere.

Intel vs. AMD: Workstation Battle April '07

Filed under

It's been quite a while since I've published a review of the workstation platforms from AMD and Intel, but, with all the changes in both platforms recently, it's high time. This brings us to this review of the Intel Xeon 5300 series processors and the AMD Opteron 2200 series processors.

Mac vs PC

Filed under

For a few months I have been spending a lot of time using a Mac running OS/X for 40 hours a week. Recently a discussion started at a client site as to whether Macs or PCs should be used for future desktop machines.

It just works, it really does

Filed under

A while back I posted about Rhythmbox including support for Open Content services such Jamendo and Magnatune. For a while now Rhythmbox has included support for and I have used it to update my account there. Well, today I went to fire up my music in Rhythmbox, clicked the entry and started listening to my Neighbour’s music.

Linux Again Kicked To The Curb

Filed under

My daily Slashdot newsletter told me all I needed to know in one simple headline: Google Desktop For Mac Released.

Honestly, I didn't want to click the link. I knew what was going to happen. I've been there...I've seen me do it. 4:30AM is way too early to go from first-cup-of-coffee to pissed-off in 3.7 seconds. I couldn't help myself. I clicked the link.

Building the XO: Porting a PyGTK game to Sugar, part one

Filed under

Welcome to this tutorial series on porting a PyGTK game to the OLPC’s Sugar environment. While we will be concentrating on a game called Block Party, the lessons taught here can be used as a guide to create or port any number of applications. Games are just more fun to learn with.

A first look at Dolphin, the KDE 4 file manager

Filed under

The Linux-based Dolphin file manager is now scheduled for official inclusion in KDE 4, the next major release of the KDE desktop environment. Dolphin includes several unique usability enhancements that aren't available in Konqueror, KDE's current file manager.

Linux Fund loses its funding source

Filed under

Linux Fund, an organization founded to fund open source projects through financing from affinity credit cards, is losing its affinity card provider. Linux Fund cardholders received official notice from the Bank of America recently that the program is being discontinued.

Open Source coders caught stealing Open Source code

Filed under

DEVELOPERS OF OpenBSD took code from their brethren at Linux, violating the code's licence, the GPL. To the horror of the Linux folk, the OpenBSD licence allows proprietary use.

The Linux coders went to great pains to reverse engineer Broadcom's wireless chipset. The company's hardware is found in many wireless devices, but Broadcom shuns open source.

Bye bye Windows I don't need you anymore

Filed under

I have been dying to say goodbye to Microsoft Windows for a number of years. I am fed up with the unceasing number of bugs, inexplicable system freezes, persistent gaping flaws that hackers can drive a truck through and empty promises of improvements with each new release. I'm ready to give Linux another try but is Linux ready for me?

Can Open Source Cure Global Software Piracy?

Filed under

Efforts to curb the practice in emerging markets fail to take into account the underlying reason it happens in the first place. Most software born in the United States is priced completely wrong for most emerging markets, given their economic state. There are also cultural considerations that are way beyond our U.S.-centric world view.

Ekiga videophone gets you connected

Filed under

Linux has come a long way in a lot of areas, but if my experience is an indicator, we're not much further along in the use of personal webcams today than we were five years ago. After a couple of unsuccessful attempts to use Ekiga (formerly GnomeMeeting) as a video phone, I finally prevailed and got Ekiga working with both sound and video.

Open source pioneers break rank on the future

Filed under

Richard Stallman looks like either a prophet or an aging hippie, but you would never mistake him for a businessman. His long brown hair, scraggily beard and penchant for T-shirts and loose-fitting pants are in sharp contrast to the striped suits worn by nearly everyone else in the technology industry.

The importance of being SUDO

Filed under

Many modern Linux distributions, in the interest of security I guess, have made the root account hidden and without a password. So even if you drop to a terminal and try to log in as root you can't. I know it is very easy to add a root password it does defeat the design philosophy of the distribution.

Compiz and Beryl are Reuniting - It's official

Filed under

After several weeks of discussion the leaders of Compiz and Beryl have agreed that the two communities shall reunite. This decision is supported by both David and Quinn and represents the majority decision of the administrators and developers in each community.

At this early stage not a lot has been decided, but these are the main points of the agreement:

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines


  • Managing OpenStack with Open Source Tools
    Day 2 operations are still dominated by manual and custom individual scripts devised by system administrators. Automation is needed by enterprises. Based on the above analysis, Ansible is a leading open source project with a high number contributions and a diverse community of contributions. Thus Ansible is a well supported and popular open source tool to orchestrate and manage OpenStack.
  • Databricks Weaves Deep Learning into Cloud-Based Spark Platform
    Databricks, a company founded by the creators of the popular open-source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, is a firm that we've been paying close attention to here at OStatic. We're fans of the company's online courses on Spark, and we recently caught up with Kavitha Mariappan, who is Vice President of Marketing at the company, for a guest post on open source tools and data science. Now, Databricks has announced the addition of deep learning support to its cloud-based Apache Spark platform. The company says this enhancement adds GPU support and integrates popular deep learning libraries to the Databricks' big data platform, extending its capabilities to enable the rapid development of deep learning models. "Data scientists looking to combine deep learning with big data -- whether it's recognizing handwriting, translating speech between languages, or distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors -- can now utilize Databricks for every stage of their workflow, from data wrangling to model tuning," the company reports, adding "Databricks is the first to integrate these diverse workloads in a fast, secure, and easy-to-use Apache Spark platform in the cloud."
  • OpenStack Building the Cloud for the Next 50 Years (and Beyond)
    Two OpenStack Foundation executives talk about what has gone wrong, what has gone right and what's next for the open-source cloud. BARCELONA, Spain—When OpenStack got started in 2010, it was a relatively small effort with only two companies involved. Over the last six years, that situation has changed dramatically with OpenStack now powering telecom, retail and scientific cloud computing platforms for some of the largest organizations in the world.
  • The Myth of the Root Cause: How Complex Web Systems Fail
    Complex systems are intrinsically hazardous systems. While most web systems fortunately don’t put our lives at risk, failures can have serious consequences. Thus, we put countermeasures in place — backup systems, monitoring, DDoS protection, playbooks, GameDay exercises, etc. These measures are intended to provide a series of overlapping protections. Most failure trajectories are successfully blocked by these defenses, or by the system operators themselves.
  • How to assess the benefits of SDN in your network
    Software-defined networking has matured from a science experiment into deployable, enterprise-ready technology in the last several years, with vendors from Big Switch Networks and Pica8 to Hewlett Packard Enterprise and VMware offering services for different use cases. Still, Nemertes Research's 2016 Cloud and Data Center Benchmark survey found a little more than 9% of organizations now deploying SDN in production.

Security News

  • GNU Tar "Pointy Feather" Vulnerability Disclosed (CVE-2016-6321)
    Last week was the disclosure of the Linux kernel's Dirty COW vulnerability while the latest high-profile open-source project going public with a new security CVE is GNU's Tar. Tar CVE-2016-6321 is also called POINTYFEATHER according to the security researchers. The GNU Pointy Feather vulnerability comes down to a pathname bypass on the Tar extraction process. Regardless of the path-name(s) specified on the command-line, the attack allows for file and directory overwrite attacks using specially crafted tar archives.
  • Let’s Encrypt and The Ford Foundation Aim To Create a More Inclusive Web
    Let’s Encrypt was awarded a grant from The Ford Foundation as part of its efforts to financially support its growing operations. This is the first grant that has been awarded to the young nonprofit, a Linux Foundation project which provides free, automated and open SSL certificates to more than 13 million fully-qualified domain names (FQDNs). The grant will help Let’s Encrypt make several improvements, including increased capacity to issue and manage certificates. It also covers costs of work recently done to add support for Internationalized Domain Name certificates. “The people and organizations that Ford Foundation serves often find themselves on the short end of the stick when fighting for change using systems we take for granted, like the Internet,” Michael Brennan, Internet Freedom Program Officer at Ford Foundation, said. “Initiatives like Let’s Encrypt help ensure that all people have the opportunity to leverage the Internet as a force for change.”
  • How security flaws work: SQL injection
    Thirty-one-year-old Laurie Love is currently staring down the possibility of 99 years in prison. After being extradited to the US recently, he stands accused of attacking systems belonging to the US government. The attack was allegedly part of the #OpLastResort hack in 2013, which targeted the US Army, the US Federal Reserve, the FBI, NASA, and the Missile Defense Agency in retaliation over the tragic suicide of Aaron Swartz as the hacktivist infamously awaited trial.
  • How To Build A Strong Security Awareness Program
    At the Security Awareness Summit this August in San Francisco, a video clip was shown that highlights the need to develop holistic security awareness. The segment showed an employee being interviewed as a subject matter expert in his office cubicle. Unfortunately, all his usernames and passwords were on sticky notes behind him, facing the camera and audience for all to see. I bring this story up not to pick on this poor chap but to highlight the fact that security awareness is about human behavior, first and foremost. Understand that point and you are well on your way to building a more secure culture and organization. My work as director of the Security Awareness Training program at the SANS Institute affords me a view across hundreds of organizations and hundreds of thousands of employees trying to build a more secure workforce and society. As we near the end of this year's National Cyber Security Awareness Month, here are two tips to incorporate robust security awareness training into your organization and daily work.

What comes after ‘iptables’? It’s successor, of course: `nftables`

Nftables is a new packet classification framework that aims to replace the existing iptables, ip6tables, arptables and ebtables facilities. It aims to resolve a lot of limitations that exist in the venerable ip/ip6tables tools. The most notable capabilities that nftables offers over the old iptables are: Read more

Linux 4.8.5

I'm announcing the release of the 4.8.5 kernel. All users of the 4.8 kernel series must upgrade. The updated 4.8.y git tree can be found at: git:// linux-4.8.y and can be browsed at the normal git web browser: Read more Also: Linux 4.4.28