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Thursday, 23 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE Frameworks Sprint - How to Release a Platform Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 5:29pm
Story Upstream and Downstream: why packaging takes time Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 5:24pm
Story Everyday I help libraries make the switch to open source Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 3:07pm
Story Open Potential Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 3:04pm
Story 9 Signs You Should Use Linux on Your Computer Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 12:45pm
Story Professors embed students directly into open source communities Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 12:44pm
Story Black Lab Linux 6.0 Preview 2 Is Now Based on Xfce and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS – Gallery Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 10:05am
Story Fedora 21 and ARM device support Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 10:02am
Story Zorin OS 9 Business Is a Good Replacement for Companies That Don't Want to Pay for Windows Rianne Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 9:56am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 13/08/2014 - 8:56am

Spawn of Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

linux-mag.com: All the major distributions including Slackware, Red Hat, SUSE, Gentoo, and Debian have reproduced to the point where the children scarcely look like the parent. Now the children have grown up enough to begin procreating new and exciting distributions of their own for every whim and user type.

Linux in Education: Concepts Not Applications

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: One of the biggest arguments used against Linux in grade school level education is that we aren't teaching kids to use the applications they'll use in the "real world". As the Technology Director for a K-12 school district, I've heard that argument many times. After all these years, I still don't buy it.

Desktop Effects Power Consumption

Filed under
Software

linuxappfinder.com: I recently installed the KDE4 version of Kubuntu on my laptop using the Wubi installer and was able to start using KWin's desktop effects on my laptop. After installing KDE4.1 beta 1 I started to get curious about battery life.

The Power of Plasma theming - a gallery of 23 themes

Filed under
KDE

liquidat.wordpress: One of the most often mentioned concerns at the KDE booth at LinuxTag was the question if Plasma would force the user to have a black panel. While we did have a second machine showing another theme to resolve all doubts it showed that not all users now yet the power of Plasma theming.

PCLinuxOS 2007: Funny name, serious distro

Filed under
PCLOS

techiemoe.com: The last time I looked at PCLinuxOS was version 0.92, which according to DistroWatch was about 3 years ago. I was asked to take a look at it again, so here I go.

Review: TinyMe 2008

Filed under
PCLOS

raiden.net: About a year ago we reviewed TinyMe when it was still in its beta and test stage. But a lot has happened in the past year, and all of it good. But what makes it so good? Well, in addition to fixing all the bugs and little quirks, TinyMe has become more stable and loads faster than it was in the early days.

Announcing GNOME Do 0.5: “The Fighting 0.5″

Filed under
Software

blog.davebsd: It has been 41 days since we released GNOME Do 0.4.2, and today I’m honored to present GNOME Do 0.5: “The Fighting 0.5″. Without further ado, here are the main improvements and new features, accompanied by plenty of sexy screenshots.

What is the ultimate goal of Linux?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ittoolbox: Microsoft has a goal. Apple has a goal. What is Linux's goal? Linux is such a large amoebic entity that it has no clear boundaries. There are no real limits to what Linux can be made to do.

Settling is Not Winning

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: Dear Red Hat, I know it might have been cheaper and definitely shorter this way, and I know your North American users will think you did it right, but it's NOT right!

Chiron FS lets you set up RAID-1 over the network

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: The Linux kernel includes support for performing RAID-1 in software. RAID-1 maintains the same filesystem on two or more disks, so that you can lose all but the last disk and still retain all of your data. This seems wonderful until you consider that an error in RAM, a power supply failure, or another hardware component in the machine can still potentially corrupt your precious data.

Invigorating GNOME

Filed under
Software

jonobacon.org: There has been some discussion recently about the future of GNOME. Although I am an ardent supporter and fanboy around GNOME, and I love the desktop for its simplicity and elegance…GNOME has become the software equivalent of my dad’s comfortable trousers - predictable and reliable.

Red Hat settles 2 patent lawsuits filed against it

Filed under
Linux
Legal

reuters.com: Business software maker Red Hat Inc said on Wednesday that it has settled two of three pending patent lawsuits that the company has been fighting.

Open source vs. proprietary? Turn the question around!

Filed under
OSS

geekzone.co.nz: Several decades ago the software 'industry' managed to re-write our perception of history and make most people believe that proprietary software is normal, and open source is the aberration, while in reality software actually started out as open. It is time to change our thinking and to stop trying to justify the use of open source software.

OpenOffice 3.0

Filed under
OOo

computerworld.com.au: OpenOffice 3.0 shows that you don't have to pay a bundle for a great office suite — in fact, you don't even have to pay a penny. OpenOffice 3.0 is a free, open-source software suite that provides most of what anyone could want in an office suite.

Also: Openoffice vs Microsoft Office
And: I'm actually using OpenOffice Writer

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Eee 8.04: Custom Ubuntu distro for the Eee PC

  • Shuttleworth talks up app launcher for 'netbooks'
  • Neelie Kroes: "Choosing open standards is a very smart business decision"
  • OpenOffice.org template collections
  • 2008 Open Source CMS Award Details Announced
  • Testing ebook readers for Project Gutenberg
  • Xubuntu Hardy died on me… Testing Gentoo Linux
  • Four national standards bodies appeal against approval of ISO/IEC DIS 29500 (PR)
  • Let's stop playing the numbers game: free software has changed the game.
  • Violate the GPL at your own risk
  • The amazing power of the community: real numbers from Apache
  • New FSF online store
  • Monitoring and Display Commands For LVM On Linux And Unix
  • Gentoo Linux Live USB key
  • Chapter 3: Configuring your project with Autoconf
  • Ubuntu Hardy on Compaq Presario 1240 (Living Without X)

Red Hat Summit sessions preview: Rik van Riel, Fedora 9, and RPM with Spot

Filed under
Linux

redhatmagazine.com: Here’s a little sneak preview of some of the educational sessions at this year’s Summit. And who better to outline their talks than the speakers themselves?

Also: Should Novell Invade Red Hat Summit?

IBM Lotus Symphony turns old OOo code into enterprise Judas goat

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Oracle and now IBM seem to have strange ideas about creating a business around open source software for the enterprise. IBM has taken old OpenOffice.org code under the now-retired Sun Industry Standards Source License and released it as a proprietary closed source freeware office suite.

Why Python is The Best

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: At the Geek Ranch we recently made a decision to implement some software in Python. Or, more accurately, I decided and there was no disagreement. Then Python gets picked as the best scripting language in the LJ Readers' Choice survey. That inspired me to write this article (and get ready for Perl and Ruby fans to start yelling at me).

"Fake" Write Support

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: In a series of seven patches, Arnd Bergmann proposed adding in-memory write support to mounted cramfs file systems. He explained, "the intention is to use it for instance on read-only root file systems like CD-ROM, or on compressed initrd images. In either case, no data is written back to the medium, but remains in the page/inode/dentry cache, like ramfs does."

Introduction to Linux Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

makeuseof.com: When you think of Linux, you probably think of open source software and security, but not gaming. Most people think if you are into gaming, Windows is your only option. A few years ago this might have been the case but not anymore.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Uber, Replacing x86 Firmware, 'IoT' and Chromebook

  • Key Dem calls for FTC to investigate Uber data breach

    A key Democrat is calling on the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to investigate a massive Uber breach that released data on 57 million people, as well as the company's delay in reporting the cyber incident.

  • Multiple states launch probes into massive Uber breach
  • Replacing x86 firmware with Linux and Go

    The problem, Minnich said, is that Linux has lost its control of the hardware. Back in the 1990s, when many of us started working with Linux, it controlled everything in the x86 platform. But today there are at least two and a half kernels between Linux and the hardware. Those kernels are proprietary and, not surprisingly, exploit friendly. They run at a higher privilege level than Linux and can manipulate both the hardware and the operating system in various ways. Worse yet, exploits can be written into the flash of the system so that they persist and are difficult or impossible to remove—shredding the motherboard is likely the only way out.

  • Connected sex-toy allows for code-injection attacks on a robot you wrap around your genitals

    However, the links included base-64 encoded versions of the entire blowjob file, making it vulnerable to code-injection attacks. As Lewis notes, "I will leave you to ponder the consequences of having an XSS vulnerability on a page with no framebusting and preauthed connection to a robot wrapped around or inside someones genitals..."

  • Chromebook exploit earns researcher second $100k bounty
    For Google’s bug bounty accountants, lightning just struck twice. In September 2016, an anonymous hacker called Gzob Qq earned $100,000 (£75,000) for reporting a critical “persistent compromise” exploit of Google’s Chrome OS, used by Chromebooks. Twelve months on and the same researcher was wired an identical pay out for reporting – yes! – a second critical persistent compromise of Google’s Chrome OS. By this point you might think Google was regretting its 2014 boast that it could confidently double its maximum payout for Chrome OS hacks to $100,000 because “since we introduced the $50,000 reward, we haven’t had a successful submission.” More likely, it wasn’t regretting it at all because isn’t being told about nasty vulnerabilities the whole point of bug bounties?
  • Why microservices are a security issue
    And why is that? Well, for those of us with a systems security bent, the world is an interesting place at the moment. We're seeing a growth in distributed systems, as bandwidth is cheap and latency low. Add to this the ease of deploying to the cloud, and more architects are beginning to realise that they can break up applications, not just into multiple layers, but also into multiple components within the layer. Load balancers, of course, help with this when the various components in a layer are performing the same job, but the ability to expose different services as small components has led to a growth in the design, implementation, and deployment of microservices.

Lumina 1.4 Desktop Environment Debuts with New Theme Engine and ZFS Integrations

Lumina 1.4.0 is a major release that introduces several new core components, such as the Lumina Theme Engine to provide enhanced theming capabilities for the desktop environment and apps written in the Qt 5 application framework. The Lumina Theme Engine comes with a configuration utility and makes the previous desktop theme system obsolete, though it's possible to migrate your current settings to the new engine. "The backend of this engine is a standardized theme plugin for the Qt5 toolkit, so that all Qt5 applications will now present a unified appearance (if the application does not enforce a specific appearance/theme of it’s own)," said the developer in today's announcement. "Users of the Lumina desktop will automatically have this plugin enabled: no special action is required." Read more

today's leftovers

  • qBittorrent 4.0 Is a Massive Update of the Open-Source BitTorrent Client
    qBittorrent, the open-source and cross-platform BitTorrent client written in Qt for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Windows systems, has been updated to version 4.0, a major release adding numerous new features and improvements. qBittorrent 4.0 is the first release of the application to drop OS/2 support, as well as support for the old Qt 4 framework as Qt 5.5.1 or later is now required to run it on all supported platforms. It also brings a new logo and a new SVG-based icon theme can be easily scaled. Lots of other cosmetic changes are present in this release, and the WebGUI received multiple enhancements.
  • FFmpeg Continues Working Its "NVDEC" NVIDIA Video Decoding Into Shape
    Earlier this month the FFmpeg project landed its initial NVDEC NVIDIA video decoding support after already supporting NVENC for video encoding. These new NVIDIA APIs for encode/decode are part of the company's Video Codec SDK with CUDA and is the successor to the long-used VDPAU video decoding on NVIDIA Linux boxes. That NVDEC support has continued getting into shape.
  • Kobo firmware 4.6.10075 mega update (KSM, nickel patch, ssh, fonts)
    A new firmware for the Kobo ebook reader came out and I adjusted the mega update pack to use it. According to the comments in the firmware thread it is working faster than previous releases. The most incredible change though is the update from wpa_supplicant 0.7.1 (around 2010) to 2.7-devel (current). Wow.
  • 3.5-inch Apollo Lake SBC has dual mini-PCIe slots and triple displays
    Avalue’s Linux-friendly, 3.5-inch “ECM-APL2” SBC features Apollo Lake SoCs, 2x GbE, 4x USB 3.0, 2x mini-PCIe, triple displays, and optional -40 to 85°C. Avalue’s 3.5-inch, Apollo Lake based ECM-APL single-board computer was announced a year ago, shortly after Intel unveiled its Apollo Lake generation. Now it has followed up with an ECM-APL2 3.5-incher with a slightly different, and reduced, feature set.
  • 7 Best Android Office Apps To Meet Your Productivity Needs
    Office application is an essential suite that allows you to create powerful spreadsheets, documents, presentations, etc., on a smartphone. Moreover, Android office apps come with cloud integration so that you can directly access the reports from the cloud, edit them, or save them online. To meet the productivity need of Android users, the Play Store offers an extensive collection of Android office apps. But, we have saved you the hassle of going through each one of them and provided you a list of the best office apps for Android. The apps that we have picked are all free, although some do have Pro version or extra features available for in-app purchases. You can also refer to this list if you’re looking for Microsoft Office alternatives for your PC.

Servers and Red Hat