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Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story NYSE switches to open source srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 4:51am
Story Adventures In Computing: From OpenSuse To Ubuntu srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 2:05am
Story Wary Puppy Linux 5.2 review srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 10:01pm
Story Scientific Linux, openSUSE, Ubuntu Tests srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 9:48pm
Story Firefox Designer Offers a Look at What Wasn’t srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 7:48pm
Story Steam on PCLinuxOS srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 7:41pm
Story New OLPC Idea: Literally Throw Them at Children from Helicopters srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 7:32pm
Story Microsoft contributes open-source code to Samba srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 7:29pm
Story KDE 4.7.3 Released srlinuxx 2 03/11/2011 - 6:01pm
Story Trinity Does New Release To Let KDE 3.5 Live On srlinuxx 3 03/11/2011 - 5:47am

Foresight Linux Launches Newsletter

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Foresight Linux is a distribution based on rPath Linux (and its Conary package management), which showcases the latest and greatest from the GNOME project. Today marks the beginning of the new monthly publication recounting the newest developments in all things Foresight.

Some of this month's highlights include:

* Foresight Linux 1.1 Released March 15th
* Latest Package Updates

Dell's March to Linux PCs Won't Be A Walk In the Park

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In pre-installing Linux on consumer PCs, Dell's biggest challenge will be in finding a full set of open-source drivers for the hardware that will run with the new machines, the software architect on the project said Friday.

HP clarifies warranty under Linux

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We received the following today by email from Hewlett Packard, which clarifies their warranty policy for customers running Linux on HP hardware, at least in the specific case we reported on recently.

Per the HP spokesperson:

HP is committed to supporting its customers and backs its PCs with a solid hardware warranty regardless of the operating system.

Kword: New feature; time to completion; 18 months

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In KWord we always had a very simple way to structure pages. We just stored the height of a page and when there is a frame at position 10000 you can calculate its at, say, page 12. Naturally, this only gets you so far and we had requests for things like differently sized pages and pagespreads.

GPL sparks openness debate in tech sector

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A divisive philosophical battle in an arcane corner of the software business could lead to some unexpected consequences for consumer electronics makers and other technology companies, according to industry lawyers and analysts.

Red Hat Reaches Adulthood

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Linux is all grown up these days.

Once, it was the Little Penguin That Could, mostly a hobby platform for system administrators to play around with on the side, or powering workstations rather than servers. Real business happened on proper Unix systems from Hewlett-Packard, or Sun, or IBM, if not on the mainframe.

Firefox tip - use a master password

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Firefox is probably the single free software project that is used by the most people and it’s a browser I personally love. Today I’m going to look at the issue of how to use a master password to protect your saved passwords.

Portrait: GNOME Foundation's Dave Neary

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Many free software advocates make a name for themselves by being involved with a single project. Dave Neary casts a wider net. He is a GNOME Foundation member, community manager of the OpenWengo project, and a former contributor to the GIMP project.

Novell dissolves its Linux Impact Team

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Novell this week dissolved its Linux Impact Team (LIT), headed by Nancy Faigen, and rolled the members of LIT into the regional sales teams. While disruptive to the individuals involved (and the LIT had some of Novell's very best employees - John Vigeant before he went to XenSource, Seth Shaw (not sure where he landed), Walter Knapp, etc.), I think this is a good move for Novell.

Tux Droid... cool toy, or Tuxploitation?

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A Belgian firm is shipping a wireless robot shaped like Tux, the Linux mascot. The KYSOH (Keep Your Sense of Humor) "Tux Droid" itself does not run Linux, however, leading some early observers to question whether the gadget exploits the Tux form factor unfairly.

Google starts running Dell Linux Desktop ads

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On March 28, Dell quietly announced that it would start offering a variety of laptops and desktops with pre-installed Linux. Now, Dell has started advertising its Linux desktops on Google ads.

While working on my personal blog site, which happens to have Google Adsense ads running on it, I was surprised to find Google ads for Linux-powered Dell desktops showing up. Here's what I saw:

Vector Programming with GCC

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The original intention of C was to provide a portable substitute for assembly language for implementing UNIX. C semantics are very similar to those of the PDP-11; for example, C includes shift operations but not rotation, because the PDP-11 didn’t have a rotate instruction. C did register naming for you, but everything else was designed to be trivial to map to an assembly language.

Displaying "MyComputer", "Trash", "Network Servers" Icons On A GNOME Desktop

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This short guide describes how you can configure your GNOME desktop to display various icons such as My Computer, Network Servers, Trash, etc. on the desktop. By default, these items are placed on one of the panels (Trash) or hidden in the Places menu.

Do You Have Questions You'd Like to Ask FSF About GPLv3?

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Well, we've had some time to think about the new draft of GPLv3, and many of us have some questions. There is a new GPLv3 draft 3 FAQ that answers some questions that have already come up, like what do the brackets mean in the draft (that they are possible inclusions, but not certain - more on that in a minute).

Changing the Console resolution

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If you run Ubuntu on a laptop or other LCD monitor, ever wanted to get the console font perfect?

Heres how.

enter the console or open a terminal window and enter;

sudo nano /boot/grub/menu.lst

Now in there should be a line, # defoptions=quiet splash

add one of the corresponded lines appropriate for the resolution you prefer or require.

San Francisco Turns To Open Source For Mapping Urban Forest

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How can open source software be harnessed to help solve environmental issues? The City of San Francisco is now starting to find that out, by turning to MapGuide Open Source software for use in its "urban forest" initiative.

Process XML using XQuery

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Learn to search your data easier and more naturally with XQuery 1.0.

Gnumeric vs. Calc

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In my previous post Calc prevailed against KSpread, but now it's faces a new challenger. Will Gnumeric have what it takes to win the crown? Gnumeric is a Free, open source spreadsheet from the GNOME project.

I tested with Gnumeric version 1.7.0 in Kubuntu Edgy and 1.7.8 in Kubuntu Feisty. For Calc I used version 2.0.4.

Format Compatibility

Has open source gone too far?

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I come in for criticism here when I write about the open source concept being extended into areas like politics and journalism.

It doesn't belong there, the critics charge. Where's the license agreement? You're rendering the concept meaningless.

OK, so how about cars? Or music?

Anaconda Improvements In F7T3

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Anaconda, the Red Hat / Fedora installer, has seen a few minor changes with Fedora 7 Test 3. I have provided screenshots of the most evident changes to the end-user, which consists of alterations on the pages for disk, time zone, and the actual install process.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • i2pd 2.10 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses. I2P client is a software used for building and using anonymous I2P networks. Such networks are commonly used for anonymous peer-to-peer applications (filesharing, cryptocurrencies) and anonymous client-server applications (websites, instant messengers, chat-servers). I2P allows people from all around the world to communicate and share information without restrictions.
  • Pixeluvo Review | Photo Editor for Linux & Windows
    A review of Pixeluvo, a great photo editor available on Linux and Windows. Pixeluvo is not free or open source.
  • Blit, A Retrospective On My Largest Project Ever
    I’ve always been someone who’s liked art and programming. Especially combining the two. One of my favorite genres is pixel art, or sprites as they are also known. I’ve dabbled in making a few other art programs before, but nothing like this. Originally Blit supposed to be only a sprite animation tool that had a modern look and feel, but my ideas for it grew greater (*sigh* feature creep). There are many other sprinting tools out there like GrafX2, Aseprite, (and other 2D animation programs like TVPaint). I’m not saying that it’s wrong that they make their own GUI toolkit, but it feels kind of odd. I really wanted to bring these types of programs out of the days of the Amiga. After doing some initial research, I settled on using Qt.
  • An alert on the upcoming 7.51.0 release
    In two weeks time, on Wednesday November 2nd, we will release curl and libcurl 7.51.0 unless something earth shattering happens.
  • Desktop Gmail Client `WMail` 2.0.0 Stable Released
    WMail is a free, open source desktop client for Gmail and Google Inbox, available for Linux, Windows, and Mac.
  • SpaceView: Ubuntu File System Usage Indicator
  • FunYahoo++: New Yahoo Messenger Plugin For Pidgin / libpurple [PPA]
    Yahoo retired its old Messenger protocol in favor of a new one, breaking compatibility with third-party applications, such as Pidgin, Empathy, and so on. Eion Robb, the SkypeWeb and Hangouts developer, has created a replacement Yahoo prpl plugin, called FunYahoo++, that works with the new Yahoo Messenger protocol. Note that I tested the plugin with Pidgin, but it should work with other instant messaging applications that support libpurple, like BitlBee or Empathy.
  • GCC Lands Loop Splitting Optimization
    The latest GCC 7 development code has an optimization pass now for loop splitting.
  • GCC 7 To End Feature Development Next Month
    Friday's GCC 7 status report indicates the feature freeze is coming up in just a few weeks. Red Hat developer Jakub Jelinek wrote in the latest status report, "Trunk which will eventually become GCC 7 is still in Stage 1 but its end is near and we are planning to transition into Stage 3 starting Nov 13th end of day time zone of your choice. This means it is time to get things you want to have in GCC 7 finalized and reviewed. As usual there may be exceptions to late reviewed features but don't count on that. Likewise target specific features can sneak in during Stage 3 if maintainers ok them."
  • GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') released [stable]
    GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release.
  • GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset released
    GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset has been released !
  • guile-ncurses 2.0 released
    I am pleased to announce the release of guile-ncurses 2.0 guile-ncurses is a library for the creation of text user interfaces in the GNU Guile dialect of the Scheme programming language. It is a wrapper to the ncurses TUI library. It contains some basic text display and keyboard and mouse input functionality, as well as a menu widget and a form widget. It also has lower level terminfo and termios functionality.
  • Unifont 9.0.03 Released
    Unifont 9.0.03 is released. The main changes are the addition of the Pikto and Tonal ConScript Unicode Registry scripts.
  • PATHspider 1.0.0 released!
    In today’s Internet we see an increasing deployment of middleboxes. While middleboxes provide in-network functionality that is necessary to keep networks manageable and economically viable, any packet mangling — whether essential for the needed functionality or accidental as an unwanted side effect — makes it more and more difficult to deploy new protocols or extensions of existing protocols. For the evolution of the protocol stack, it is important to know which network impairments exist and potentially need to be worked around. While classical network measurement tools are often focused on absolute performance values, PATHspider performs A/B testing between two different protocols or different protocol extensions to perform controlled experiments of protocol-dependent connectivity problems as well as differential treatment.
  • The Domain Name System

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE

  • Happy 20th birthday, KDE!
    KDE turned twenty recently, which seems significant in a world that seems to change so fast. Yet somehow we stay relevant, and excited to continue to build a better future. Lydia asked recently on the KDE-Community list what we were most proud of.
  • SETI – Week of Information Technology
  • KDevelop for Windows available on Chocolatey now
    Which is already great in itself! But now it's also possible to install it via the super popular Windows package manager for Windows, Chocolatey.
  • colord-kde 0.5.0 released!
    Last official stable release was done more than 3 years ago, it was based on Qt/KDE 4 tech, after that a few fixes got in what would be 0.4.0 but as I needed to change my priorities it was never released. Thanks to Lukáš Tinkl it was ported to KF5, on his port he increased the version number to 0.5.0, still without a proper release distros rely on a git checkout.
  • Call for attendees Lakademy 2017
    As many of you know, since 2012 we organize the Lakademy, a sort of Latin American Akademy. The event brings together KDE Latin American contributors in hacking sessions to work on their projects, promo meetings to think KDE dissemination strategies in the region and other activities.
  • Plasma 5 Desktop on FreeBSD Branding
    The FreeBSD packages of KDE software — the KDE 4 desktop, and soon KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 5 Desktop and KDE Applications — have traditionally been shipped pretty much as delivered from the upstream source. We compile, we package, and there is very little customization we do as a “distro”. The KDE 4 packages came with a default wallpaper that was a smidgen different from the one shipped with several Linux distro’s. I think Ivan Cukic did that artwork originally. For Plasma 5 Desktop, we also wanted to do a tiny bit of branding — just the default wallpaper for new users, mind.
  • A bit on Tooling
    So on the weekend I also worked on updating Qt 5.6.1 to Qt 5.6.2 on FreeBSD, which involves using new and scary tools as well. Power tools, they can be really useful, or they can take off a finger if you’re not careful. In this case it was Phabricator, which is also used in KDE — but not everywhere in KDE. For FreeBSD, the tool is used to review updates to ports (the packaging instructions), so I did an update of Qt from 5.6.1 to 5.6.2 and we handled the review through FreeBSD’s Phab. The ports infrastructure is stored in SVN, so the review is relatively straightforward: update the ports-tree checkout, apply your changes, use arc to create or update a review request. I was amazed by how painless it was — somehow I’d been frightened. Using the tool once, properly, makes a big difference in self-confidence.
  • Krita 3.1 second beta.
    The Krita 3.1 beta come with a full features and fixes. The linux version to download your krita-3.0.91-x86_64.appimage.
  • Second Beta for Krita 3.1 Available
    We’re still fixing bugs like madmen… And working on some cool new features as well, but that’s for a later release. In any case, here is the second Krita 3.1 beta! Yes, you’re reading that correctly. Originally, we had planned to use 3.0.2 as the version for this release, but there is so much news in it that it merits a bigger version bump.


  • Consequences of the HACK CAMP 2016 FEDORA + GNOME
    I used to do install parties in order to promote the use of FEDORA and GNOME project since five years ago. As you can see more details in the Release Party FEDORA 17 for Fedora, and Linux Camp 2012, GNOME PERU 2013, GNOME PERU 2014...
  • GNOME Shell Making It Easy To Launch Apps/Games For Optimus / Dual GPU Systems
    With the GNOME 3.24 desktop that's currently in development the latest GNOME Shell code has support for easily letting the user launch an app on a dedicated GPU when applicable for handling NVIDIA Optimus use-cases of having integrated and discrete GPU laptops. When a dual-GPU system is detected, a menu item will be added to opt for "Launch using Dedicated Graphics Card", per this commit. The GNOME Shell change for supporting discrete GPUs was made and when the user opts to launch on the dedicated GPU, the DRI_PRIME=1 environment variable will automatically be set for that new program/game.