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Tuesday, 24 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • RandR 1.3 Arrives With Panning Support

  • What might end Apple’s open source pass
  • Fedora 10 is a 10
  • Fedora 10 out - is it the best alternative to Ubuntu?
  • Intel's Linux-based Moblin platform arrives on devices
  • How open should your open source business strategy be
  • Crappy economy = great time for open source in schools
  • Do you miss the Elephant Skin Wallpaper in Ibex?
  • The Top 5 Best Online Sources For Fonts
  • Spice up Your System with Open Source Fonts
  • 40 Tips for optimizing your php code
  • Fixing UMTS upload performance on Linux
  • Shopping for Your Linux Loved Ones
  • Dealing With "Argument list too long" Errors on Linux and Unix
  • Netbook world summit
  • GNU Xnee: Workaround for Xvfb bug
  • Linux System monitoring using Dstat
  • Building an OpenBSD Gateway - Part 3
  • Useful programs and procedures for gentoo newcomers: USE flags
  • Multimedia Support in Fedora 10
  • Using wvdial in Linux
  • Ubuntu on an iBook
  • Fix window titlebar drawing problems with NVIDIA
  • Create new virtual machine in Virtualbox

OpenSUSE 11.1 RC and KDE 4.1

Filed under
SUSE

blogbeebe.blogspot: The release Thursday of OpenSUSE 11.1 RC 'incited' me to download the KDE-based Open CD version and give it a spin. I've been tracking KDE 4.1 across three distributions (Mandriva 2009, Fedora 10, and OpenSUSE). Kubuntu in any version is one of the worst ways to experience KDE.

Mandriva 2009.0 Review:

Filed under
MDV

ryanorser.com: Mandriva has been great for users who just like to have something that looks peaceful and easy to use. For new users with laptops I would recommend Mandriva One 2009 as it has a better background and supports wireless….

Ubuntu developers discovered exactly nothing

Filed under
Ubuntu

beranger.org: Only a site like Softpedia can post an article such as Newly Discovered Kernel Vulnerabilities Affect All Ubuntu Users, which starts this way: «Yesterday, November 27th, the Ubuntu developers discovered yet another security issue (actually, more than one) in the Linux kernel packages.» On the contrary, they were late to fix those kernel vulnerabilities...

Picasa 3: Great Linux photo software

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: I have a confession to make. There's no software on earth I can't make dance and sing... except for photography programs. Whether it's Adobe Photoshop CS4 on a Mac or GIMP 2.6.3 on Linux, I'm a klutz.

KDE Videocast Episode 3, November 29

Filed under
KDE

aseigo.blogspot: Episode 3 of my KDE videocast will be broadcast live at 17:00 UTC on Saturday, November 29nd over at UStream.

Also: dolphin screencast

Linux and Us Kenyans - Part II

Filed under
Linux

mwendariungu.wordpress: Most of us are still holding on to ancient Linux distros whose operation may involve extensive use of command line tools made necessary by the need to install software from external sources.

Newly Discovered Kernel Vulnerabilities Affect All Ubuntu Users

Filed under
Security

news.softpedia.com: Yesterday, November 27th, the Ubuntu developers discovered yet another security issue (actually, more than one) in the Linux kernel packages. These vulnerabilities affect the following Ubuntu distributions: 6.06 LTS, 7.10, 8.04 LTS and 8.10 (also applies to Kubuntu, Edubuntu and Xubuntu).

Half of Firefox Extensions Not Compatible with 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF

cybernetnews.com: Mozilla is on the verge of releasing Firefox 3.1 Beta 2, and it’s quite possible that in the next month or two the final version will be pushed out the door. A major new release like this means that some of your favorite extensions might not be working, and Mozilla doesn’t want that to happen.

Proprietary Firmware and the Pursuit of a Free Kernel

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: Knowing when a GNU/Linux distribution is free used to be simple. If all its software had licenses approved by the Free Software Foundation (FSF) or the Open Source Initiative, then a distribution was free. Otherwise, it wasn't. However, the release of the GNewSense distribution a few years ago has complicated the situation.

Plymouth To Replace USplash In Ubuntu?

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: We've talked about Plymouth now a number of times at Phoronix, which is Red Hat's RHGB replacement starting with Fedora 10 and uses newer Linux technologies like kernel mode-setting to drive this graphical boot screen. Now it looks like Plymouth may make its way into Ubuntu.

Open Letter to Mr.Hervé Yahi, Mandriva CEO

Filed under
MDV

rodgerdean.org/blog: Mandriva under a change of a new CEO have now put corporate interest above the life source of the distribution; its own community and leadership in the attempt to save a dollar. This will be the ulitmate downfall of the distro if these changes continue to happen.

What Does Open Source Taste Like?

Filed under
OSS

linuxjournal.com: For those of you familiar with twitter, the "microblogging" social-networking tool, you know that it can be a fun way to gather data from a large group of people. If you have a substantial enough group of followers, inevitably, a few are paying attention most of the time, and you will get a handful of interesting responses to almost any question.

Fedora 10 vs. Ubuntu 8.10 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: With Fedora 10 finally entering the world earlier this week, we have performed benchmarks comparing the performance of Ubuntu 8.10 and Fedora 10. In our testing we used both the 32-bit and 64-bit builds of each distribution and then ran a series of automated tests through the Phoronix Test Suite.

Vector Linux 6 Beta And The Sticky Gui

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: But one of the things - possibly the only thing - which may have held this distribution back from a regular top 10 spot on the Distrowatch rankings might be its lack of a GUI (Graphical User Interface) installer. Until now.

The history of PC hardware, in pictures

Filed under
Hardware

royal.pingdom.com: We all use personal computers and we all take them for granted in our everyday lives. It’s easy to forget that PCs have only been around for a couple of decades, and initially were nowhere near the powerhouses we have on our desks today.

Java and Linux - an open marriage in search of success

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: In 2004 Eric Raymond wrote an open letter to Sun Microsystems' then chief executive officer Scott McNealy demanding Sun open up their core Java intellectual property and allow anyone do whatever they damn well please with it.

LOL With Funny Linux Man Pages

Filed under
Software

junauza.com: Are you feeling a little down lately? Why not open a Linux terminal and read some man pages. Well, not those man pages that can sometimes make our head spin. I'm talking about the funny man pages that will make you laugh out loud.

openDesktop.org provides super-portal to free software sites

Filed under
Web

linux.com: When users want the latest in free and open source software (FOSS), they are likely to think first of sites like freshmeat, or perhaps Softpedia or GnomeFiles. However, as the FOSS community has divided into specialized communities, sites for new releases have proliferated, to the point where it is difficult to keep track of them all. Since 2007, openDesktop.org has provided a portal for many of these specialized sites.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Installing Drupal on Ubuntu in a few easy steps

  • Interview with openSUSE Board member Bryen Yunashko
  • Acer Aspire One and Linux
  • SproutCore on Intrepid Ibex
  • An early glimpse of Ubuntu 9.04
  • MySQL 5.1 is ready
  • Increase downloading Speed with Prozilla Download Accelerator for Linux
  • Upgrading Nvidia 96xx from Ubuntu 8.04 to 8.10
  • Speeding up a slow NVidia 8400 card in opensuse linux
  • Setting up your Ubuntu Server for Merb
  • Extract and Create RAR Files in Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Packages Get Bazaar-ed
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More in Tux Machines

GNU: The GNU C Library 2.28 and Guix on Android

  • Glibc 2.28 Upstream Will Build/Run Cleanly On GNU Hurd
    While Linux distributions are still migrating to Glibc 2.27, in the two months since the release changes have continued building up for what will eventually become the GNU C Library 2.28. The Glibc 2.28 work queued thus far isn't nearly as exciting as all the performance optimizations and more introduced with Glibc 2.27, but it's a start. Most notable at this point for Glibc 2.28 is that it will now build and run cleanly on GNU/Hurd without requiring any out-of-tree patches. There has been a ton of Hurd-related commits to Glibc over the past month.
  • Guix on Android!
    Last year I thought to myself: since my phone is just a computer running an operating system called Android (or Replicant!), and that Android is based on a Linux kernel, it's just another foreign distribution I could install GNU Guix on, right? It turned out it was absolutely the case. Today I was reminded on IRC of my attempt last year at installing GNU Guix on my phone. Hence this blog post. I'll try to give you all the knowledge and commands required to install it on your own Android device.
  • GNU Guix Wrangled To Run On Android
    The GNU Guix transactional package manager can be made to run on Android smartphones/tablets, but not without lots of hoops to jump through first.

Node.js 10.9 and npm milestone

  • Open Source Node.js Hits v10, with Better Security, Performance, More
    Speaking of which, the brand-new Node.js 10.0 is expected to soon support npm version 6 (currently Node.js ships with npm 5.7.x). The company npm Inc., which maintains the npm software package management application, today announced that major update, called npm@6. The npm company said its JavaScript software installer tool includes new security features for developers working with open source code.
  • Announcing npm@6
    In coordination with today’s announcement of Node.js v10, we’re excited to announce npm@6. This major update to npm includes powerful new security features for every developer who works with open source code. Read on to understand why this matters.

Openwashing: Sony, Scality and Ericsson

Voyage/Open Autonomous Safety (OAS) Now on GitHub

  • Voyage open-sources autonomous driving safety practices
    Dubbed Open Autonomous Safety, the initiative aims to help autonomous driving startups implement better safety-testing practices. Companies looking to access the documents, safety procedures and test code can do so via a GitHub repository.
  • Open-Sourcing Our Approach to Autonomous Safety
    Without a driver to help identify and mitigate failures, autonomous vehicle systems need incredibly robust safety requirements and an equally comprehensive and well-defined process for analyzing risks and assessing capabilities. Voyage models its safety approach after the ISO 26262 standard for automotive safety, taking the best practices from the automotive industry and applying them to autonomous technology. The automotive industry continues to reach for new levels of safety in manufacturing vehicles, and we are inspired by that approach.
  • Startup Voyage Wants to Open Source Self-Driving Car Safety
    Under what the company calls its Open Autonomous Safety initiative, Voyage is publishing information on its safety procedures, materials, and test code in a series of releases. The goal is to create an open-source library of safety procedures that multiple companies can use as a standard, a Voyage blog post said.
  • This startup’s CEO wants to open-source self-driving car safety testing
    The initial release, which Voyage calls Open Autonomous Safety (OAS), will take the form of a GitHub repository containing documents and code. The functional safety requirements are Voyage's interpretation of the ISO 26262 standard for automotive safety, updated for autonomous vehicles. "This is our internal driving test for any particular software build," says Cameron. "It lets us evaluate our designs and look for the different ways they can fail in the real world."