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Monday, 25 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Stable kernels 3.14.6, 3.10.42, and 3.4.92 Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:42pm
Story Tango Studio 2.2 Is a Distro for Musicians and Professional Studios Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:27pm
Story IT’S HERE: DOCKER 1.0 Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:21pm
Story Wireless speakers run Linux, control IoT stuff Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:13pm
Story F2FS Gets Enhanced For The Linux 3.16 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:12pm
Story Reports Cites Google Surpassing Microsoft in Browser Market Share Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 8:01pm
Story Superb Interstellar Marines Tactical FPS Arrives on Steam for Linux Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 2:41pm
Story CyanogenMod 11.0 M7 Released Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 2:35pm
Story GNOME Board of Directors Elections 2014 - Preliminary Results Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 2:30pm
Story Quick Look: Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 Rianne Schestowitz 09/06/2014 - 2:25pm

OS Smackdown: Linux vs. Mac OS X vs. Windows Vista vs. Windows XP

Filed under
OS

computerworld.com: Since the dawn of time -- or, at least, the dawn of personal computers -- the holy wars over desktop operating systems have raged, with each faction proclaiming the unrivaled superiority of its chosen OS and the vile loathsomeness of all others.

Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring release warm up

Filed under
MDV

club.mandriva.com: The Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring release warm up programme has begun: 300 early seeders have been contacted and have started to seed the torrents. Be ready to download Mandriva Linux 2008 Spring in the very next days!

HP Mini-Note 2133

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

maximumpc.com: So, exactly how much do you sacrifice under the hood with a $750 subcompact? 1280x720 screen, full-size keyboard, and slick aluminum shell. We’ve spent the last few days testing the high-end, $750 model, which sports a 1.6GHz VIA CPU, 2GB of RAM, and a higher capacity battery. The operating system: you can choose between SuSe Linux or two flavors of Vista.

Zonbu Notebook Review: Part I

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

osweekly.com: When I first discovered that I going to receive a Beta testing review notebook from Zonbu, I was a bit skeptical. Despite being excited to try out one of their latest contraptions, I could not get my head around the challenges of a Linux notebook that was simple enough for the most casual PC user.

Ubuntu breathes new life into school's abandoned hardware

Filed under
Ubuntu

computerworld.com.au: When 3Ghz dual core computers running 2GB of RAM weren't being used for many heavily CPU-intensive applications in a Victorian secondary school library, the school's IT department initially joked about replacing them with older and previously abandoned hardware. Then it saw the serious side.

Nine Improvements Needed in KDE

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: KDE 4 is a radical overhaul of the popular desktop. It offers broad improvements like the Oxygen desktop theme, SVG graphics, and enhanced speeds thanks to the latest version of the Qt 4 toolkit. It also offers specific improvements such as the font manager and the Dolphin file manager. In short, there's a lot to like.

Dell giving the shaft to open source ubuntu customers?

Filed under
Ubuntu

openswitch.org: First off, I should say that I like Dell computers. I’ve owned three Dell desktops and one Dell laptop. All have been of high quality and unlike some people, I actually think their customer service is very good. But recently I went to purchase a new desktop PC on which I am going to install ubuntu and saw some grim facts.

The state of open source: Eric S. Raymond, open source advocate

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

computerworld.com.au: Notorious open source advocate and author of The Cathedral and the Bazaar, Eric S. Raymond brings colorful acumen to any open source discussion. Here's how Raymond views the continually evolving open source landscape.

Microsoft Says OOXML Vote Was Fair

Filed under
Microsoft

informationweek.com: Microsoft said allegations that it improperly influenced the vote on a new standard for digital document creation are unfounded and arise mostly from individuals and companies unhappy with the vote's result.

Open source: Why we can't just give this stuff away

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Adrian Kingsley-Hughes has a great post over on Datamation entitled, "Linux...Why is it So Hard to Give It Away?". He addresses the difficulty in getting retailers to sell cheap Linux-based PCs, and decides that the problem is the support burden. Good points, but I'm more interested in the larger, underlying question:

25 Reasons to use Ubuntu Linux instead of Windows

Filed under
Ubuntu

anuragbansal.wordpress: That is an ongoing debate whether you should use Linux or Windows or Mac. I thought of collating some reasons which might make you think twice while buying another Windows PC.

NBC Direct still waives off OSX, Linux users

Filed under
Web

tech.blorge.com: Welcome to 2008, the year during which the major media groups are all up to speed on supporting multiple operating systems and platforms, right? Not entirely.

Komparator — a comparing tool for KDE

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: Komparator is an application, that can compare and synchronize the content of two (local or remote) folders. Contrary to popular belief this activity is popular among users of all platforms, but in Linux you have to use unfriendly console apps (such as diff) to do the job.

Hans Reiser Turns Up 'Geek Defense' to 11

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Linux programmer Hans Reiser put the pedal to the metal on his geek defense at his murder trial here Monday, explaining to jurors that, as nonscientists, they may not understand his social ineptness.

Linux Driver Project Status Report as of April 2008

Filed under
Software

Greg KH: This is a status report for the Linux Driver Project as of April 2008, describing what has happened in the past year of work. It was originally posted on the developer mailing list.

Daniel Robbins' Gentoo Stages Update

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.funtoo.org: Many of you probably know that I am building up weekly Gentoo stages for x86, i686, athlon-xp, amd64, core64 and core32. Here's an update:

Switching From XP to Linux - Should You?

Filed under
Linux

ubuntulinuxhelp.com: This is a hard question to answer for you in one post. To answer the question, perhaps it’s best to ask yourself this question, “Is it a good idea to switch to Linux?” or “Am I willing to take the time to explore new things and have fun?” If you’ve answered yes, read on… Smile

Firefox Vs. Safari: Small Features Make A Big Difference

Filed under
Moz/FF

informationweek.com/blog: Daring Fireball's John Gruber has a fling with Firefox, but comes home to Safari. My experience is the opposite of Gruber's: I've tried Safari several times, and keep coming back to Firefox.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Mounting a SSH folder locally with sshfs

  • Copy files from Windows or Mac to Linux safely
  • Proftpd: listen on single ip
  • Play Windows Games on Linux
  • Use command-line MySQL for additional flexibility
  • git: basic commands for standalobne individual tracking
  • Using OpenOffice History at the Command Line
  • How To Install Munin
  • Securing Your Server With AppArmor
  • Recover Your Forgotten Password In Linux
  • Generating Patch Emails With Git
  • Getting Scroll Lock to Work in Ubuntu

Application/ Software management in Ubuntu Gutsy

Filed under
HowTos

nikopsk.wordpress: If you are very new to Ubuntu and have come from Windows where you got most updates by visiting the various vendors of each application and doing so separately; you are in for a shock! In this simple how-to you will learn how easy it is to install in various different ways and remove software as well.

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Packet radio lives on through open source software

Packet radio is an amateur radio technology from the early 1980s that sends data between computers. Linux has natively supported the packet radio protocol, more formally known as AX.25, since 1993. Despite its age, amateur radio operators continue to use and develop packet radio today. A Linux packet station can be used for mail, chat, and TCP/IP. It also has some unique capabilities, such as tracking the positions of nearby stations or sending short messages via the International Space Station (ISS). Read more

Linux 4.14-rc2

I'm back to my usual Sunday release schedule, and rc2 is out there in all the normal places. This was a fairly usual rc2, with a very quiet beginning of the week, and then most changes came in on Friday afternoon and Saturday (with the last few ones showing up Sunday morning). Normally I tend to dislike how that pushes most of my work into the weekend, but this time I took advantage of it, spending the quiet part of last week diving instead. Anyway, the only unusual thing worth noting here is that the security subsystem pull request that came in during the merge window got rejected due to problems, and so rc2 ends up with most of that security pull having been merged in independent pieces instead. Read more Also: Linux 4.14-rc2 Kernel Released

Manjaro Linux Phasing out i686 (32bit) Support

In a not very surprising move by the Manjaro Linux developers, a blog post was made by Philip, the Lead Developer of the popular distribution based off Arch Linux, On Sept. 23 that reveals that 32-bit support will be phased out. In his announcement, Philip says, “Due to the decreasing popularity of i686 among the developers and the community, we have decided to phase out the support of this architecture. The decision means that v17.0.3 ISO will be the last that allows to install 32 bit Manjaro Linux. September and October will be our deprecation period, during which i686 will be still receiving upgraded packages. Starting from November 2017, packaging will no longer require that from maintainers, effectively making i686 unsupported.” Read more