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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story SuperX 2.0 Darwin review - Enterprise not srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 7:18pm
Story Best Open source highlights from June srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 7:16pm
Story How XMir and Mir fit together srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 7:15pm
Story OS X apps on their way to Linux courtesy of Darling project srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 4:10pm
Story Linux Mint 15 Xfce Report srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 4:09pm
Story The future of Linux: Evolving everywhere srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 4:07pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 516 srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 11:05am
Story Linux 3.11 Gets New Lustre srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 11:03am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 15/07/2013 - 5:18am
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 14/07/2013 - 8:37pm

Easy blogging with Pivot

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The GPL-licensed Pivot blogging software stands out among blogging applications because it requires no database, no extra libraries, and minimal installation effort. While it's still in an early stage of development, its flexibilty and the ease with which it can be set up make it ideal for those new to maintaining their own blogging Web sites.

We don't need a fractured Linux.

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: There is a big problem in the FOSS world. Especially with Linux. That problem is every group considers themselves to be on their own little island and only wish to concern themselves with their territory.

Dell's Desktop Linux Strategy: So Far, So Good

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha.com: So far, so good. That statement sums up Dell's (DELL) current desktop Linux strategy, which focuses heavily on the Ubuntu operating system from Canonical.

Xen Cluster Management With Ganeti On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

Ganeti is a cluster virtualization management system based on Xen. In this tutorial I will explain how to create one virtual Xen machine (called an instance) on a cluster of two physical nodes, and how to manage and failover this instance between the two physical nodes.

Mint Linux: The way Linux was meant to be

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe: I've had a couple of folks tell me to try out Mint Linux. Last night, I downloaded Celena BETA 017. Tonight, I burned the CD and booted it up on europa.

Debating Distributed Block Devices

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I'm pleased to announce [the] fourth release of the distributed storage subsystem, which allows [you] to form a storage [block device] on top of remote and local nodes, which in turn can be exported to another storage [block device] as a node to form tree-like storage [block devices]."

Today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • PCLinuxOS

  • Is Ubuntu for You?
  • Does Microsoft matter any more?
  • Mozilla's New Focus on Thunderbird and Internet Communications
  • Will Linux Steal Apple's Thunder?
  • Why Windows Users Are Insane

Testing Compiz Fusion under Mandriva 2008.0 RC1

Filed under
MDV

Fabrice Facorat: After my proposal for having a customized Compiz Fusion in Mandriva 2008.0, I decide to activate Compiz and play a little with some of the settings. I tried to keep the settings simple in order to have a beautiful but also an efficient 3D desktop.

ATI Radeon HD 2900XT Powered By Open-Source Driver

Filed under
Hardware
Software

phoronix: The open-source Avivo driver is currently bound to supporting the ATI R500 GPU family and with efforts now being focused on the RadeonHD driver, this reverse-engineered driver will likely never support the newer GPUs. Inside our labs we tried out the Radeon HD 2900XT with the RadeonHD driver on Fedora 7.

Linux coders crack Apple's iPod Touch

Filed under
Linux

Programmers have bypassed a new difficulty in providing Linux support for the latest-generation iPods.

Some Howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using Ubuntu Linux on a flash drive and run it under Windows

  • OOo: Your basic everyday sorting
  • Installing C++ Boost 1.34.1 on Slackware/Zenwalk
  • Delete files securely with shred
  • Memcached 1.2.2 on Debian Etch
  • Pretty Emacs Reloaded
  • quickly resize or rotate images within nautilus
  • Screencast HOWTO under Mandriva
  • Installing The RadeonHD Driver On Ubuntu

Introducing The RadeonHD Linux Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: Not only is AMD providing the open-source community with their ATI GPU specifications, but they have also been partnering with Novell on the development of a new open-source display driver. We've been telling you about AMD's open-source work all month, and today the new driver is finally available for download. In this article we have some initial information to share.

Sparse v0.4 Released

Filed under
Software

kernelTRAP: Josh Triplett announced the release of Sparse v0.04. Originally written by Linux creator Linus Torvalds, Sparse has been maintained by Josh since 2006.

SCO Blames Linux For Bankruptcy Filing

Filed under
Linux

information week: SCO Group CEO Darl McBride says competition from the open source Linux operating system was a major reason why the company was forced to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Friday.

ubuntu shorts

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Forums survives first DDOS attack

  • Back to School in Venezuela, Ubuntu is waiting…
  • Why Does Ubuntu Suck…
  • Ubuntu gutsy is about to mess up

some teehees

Filed under
Humor
  • Linux Only For Geeks?

  • Ubuntu: When 100% Isn't Good Enough...
  • Good ol’ computer humour

Running Nvidia display drivers with X.Org 7.3

Filed under
HowTos

linuxinsight: I'm pretty convinced that X.Org 7.3 will work well for people, unless you're using proprietary display drivers, that is. I feel forced to use Nvidia drivers, because open source ones are quite slow (nv) or not yet ready for general usage (nouveau).

Mass-migrating Microsoft Word documents to OpenOffice.org on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

searchenterpriselinux.techtarget: Is your organization in the process of migrating from Microsoft Word to OpenOffice.org on Linux? If so, your biggest obstacle may not be getting used to the new suite, but rather moving from Microsoft's proprietary .doc format to OpenOffice's Open Document Format (ODF).

TinyME Packs a Big Punch

Filed under
Linux

reviewlinux: TinyME Test 6 was announced today on Distrowatch.Com and we thought we would take a quick look at it. This little distro packs a big punch and we enjoyed the ride.

A short Review on ReactOS 0.3.3

Filed under
OS

matthias-endler.de: FreeWin95 has come a long way since it has been renamed in 1998 and is now called ReactOS. The new version 0.3.3 of the Windows 2000 clone already has a lot to offer and has significantly evolved in almost all areas compared to the last release. The developers have made a lot of progress in the lower system area (i. e. the NT® Kernel) as well as in the application segment. Let’s have a look at some new features!

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Tizen and Android

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Making your OpenStack monitoring stack highly available using Open Source tools
    Operators tasked with maintaining production environments are relying on monitoring stacks to provide insight to resource usage and a heads-up to threats of downtime. Perhaps the most critical function of a monitoring stack is providing alerts which trigger mitigation steps to ensure an environment stays up and running. Downtime of services can be business-critical, and often has extremely high cost ramifications. Operators working in cloud environments are especially reliant on monitoring stacks due to the increase in potential inefficiency and downtime that comes with greater resource usage. The constant visibility of resources and alerts that a monitoring stack provides, makes it a fundamental component of any cloud.
  • InfraRed: Deploying and Testing Openstack just made easier!
  • The journey of a new OpenStack service in RDO
    When new contributors join RDO, they ask for recommendations about how to add new services and help RDO users to adopt it. This post is not a official policy document nor a detailed description about how to carry out some activities, but provides some high level recommendations to newcomers based on what I have learned and observed in the last year working in RDO.
  • Getting to know the essential OpenStack components better
  • Getting to know core components, speed mentoring, and more OpenStack news
  • Testing LibreOffice 5.3 Notebookbar
    I teach an online CSCI class about usability. The course is "The Usability of Open Source Software" and provides a background on free software and open source software, and uses that as a basis to teach usability. The rest of the class is a pretty standard CSCI usability class. We explore a few interesting cases in open source software as part of our discussion. And using open source software makes it really easy for the students to pick a program to study for their usability test final project.
  • [Older] Drupal member sent out after BDSM lifestyle revealed

    Drupal, like many other open source projects, has a stated goal of welcoming and accepting all people, no matter their heritage, culture, sexual orientation, gender identity or other factors.

  • Controversy Erupts in Open-Source Community After Developer's Sex Life Made Public
    Drupal is a popular open-source content-management system, used to build websites. Like many other open-source projects, Drupal is guided by several committees that are supposed to be accountable to the community and its code of conduct, which enshrines values like "be considerate" and "be respectful." Also like many other open-source projects, Drupal attracts all sorts of people, some of whom are eclectic. Last week, under murky circumstances, Drupal creator Dries Buytaert banned one of the project's technical and community leaders, Larry Garfield. Buytaert attributed the decision to aspects of Garfield's private sex life. Many Drupal users and developers are up in arms about the perceived injustice of the move, exacerbated by what they see as a lack of transparency.
  • HospitalRun: Open Source Software for the Developing World
    When open source software is used for global health and global relief work, its benefits shine bright. The benefits of open source become very clear when human health and human lives are on the line. In this YouTube video, hear Harrisburg, Pennsylvania software developer Joel Worrall explain about HospitalRun software – open source cloud-based software used at developing world healthcare facilities.
  • Scotland emphasises sharing and reuse of ICT
    Scotland’s public administrations should focus on common, shared technology platforms, according to the new digital strategy, published on 22 March. The government says it wants to develop “shared infrastructure, services and standards in collaboration with our public sector partners, to reduce costs and enable resources to be focused on front-line services.”
  • [Older] OpenSSL Re-licensing to Apache License v. 2.0 To Encourage Broader Use with Other FOSS Projects and Products

    OpenSSL Launches New Website to Organize Process, Seeks to Contact All Contributors

  • Austria state secretary promotes open data
    The State Secretary at Austria’s Federal Chancellery, Muna Duzdar, is encouraging the making available of government data as open data. “The administration must set an example and support the open data culture by giving society its data back”, the State Secretary for Digitalisation said in a statement.
  • Study: Hungary should redouble open data initiatives
    The government of Hungary should redouble its efforts to make public sector information available as open data, and actively help to create market opportunities, a government white paper recommends. The ‘White Paper on National Data Policy’ was approved by the government in December.
  • Williamson School Board OKs developing open source science curriculum
    Science textbooks may be a thing of the past in Williamson County Schools. The Williamson County school board approved a proposal Monday night to use open source science resources instead of science textbooks. The switch will require a team of nine teachers to spend a year developing an open source curriculum.
  • How Elsevier plans to sabotage Open Access
    It was a long and difficult road to get the major publishing houses to open up to open access, but in the end the Dutch universities got their much awaited ‘gold deal’ for open access. A recently revealed contract between Elsevier and the Dutch research institutes lays bare the retardant tactics the publishing giant employs to stifle the growth of open access.
  • #0: Introducing R^4
  • RcppTOML 0.1.2

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • FedEx Will Pay You $5 to Install Flash on Your Machine
    FedEx is making you an offer you can’t afford to accept. It’s offering to give you $5 (actually, it’s a discount on orders over $30) if you’ll just install Adobe Flash on your machine. Nobody who knows anything about online security uses Flash anymore, except when it’s absolutely necessary. Why? Because Flash is the poster child for the “security-vulnerability-of-the-hour” club — a group that includes another Adobe product, Acrobat. How unsafe is Flash? Let’s put it this way: seven years ago, Steve Jobs announced that Flash was to be forever banned from Apple’s mobile products. One of the reasons he cited was a report from Symantec that “highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009.” Flash security hasn’t gotten any better since.
  • Every once in a while someone suggests to me that curl and libcurl would do better if rewritten in a “safe language”
  • An insecure dishwasher has entered the IoT war against humanity

    Regel says that he has contacted Miele on a number of occasions about the issue, but had failed to get a response to his missives, and this has no updated information on the vulnerability.

    He added, bleakly that "we are not aware of an actual fix."

  • Monday Witness: It's Time to Reconize a Civil Right Not to be Connected
    Along with death and taxes, two things appear inevitable. The first is that Internet of Things devices will not only be built into everything we can imagine, but into everything we can't as well. The second is that IoT devices will have wholly inadequate security, if they have any security at all. Even with strong defenses, there is the likelihood that governmental agencies will gain covert access to IoT devices anyway. What this says to me is that we need a law that guarantees consumers the right to buy versions of products that are not wirelessly enabled at all.
  • Remember kids, if you're going to disclose, disclose responsibly!
    If you pay any attention to the security universe, you're aware that Tavis Ormandy is basically on fire right now with his security research. He found the Cloudflare data leak issue a few weeks back, and is currently going to town on LastPass. The LastPass crew seems to be dealing with this pretty well, I'm not seeing a lot of complaining, mostly just info and fixes which is the right way to do these things.