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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 18 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Music players shakedown srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 7:48pm
Story GPL Violations Are Still Pretty Common srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 7:36pm
Story Kernel Log - Coming in 3.6 (part 4): Drivers srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 7:28pm
Story A Look Into StuntRally 1.7 srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 7:27pm
Story Bossies 2012: The Best of Open Source Software Awards srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 6:15pm
Story Zorin Linux Is Heavy on the Windows Dressing srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 5:50pm
Story Forbes Earnings Preview: Red Hat srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 5:46pm
Story openSUSE 12.2: My first take srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 5:44pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 474 srlinuxx 2 19/09/2012 - 5:35pm
Story Sabayon 10 Released with Four Desktop Choices srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 2:50am

Repeat last shell command that started with a particular word

Filed under
HowTos

nixcraft: Bash / CSH shell offers command history feature. Most of you may be aware and using of UP / DOWN arrow keys to recall previous commands. History expansions introduce words from the history list into the input stream.

Configuring Mutt To Use An Alternate MTA : ESMTP

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu-tutorials.com: In this tutorial I’ll outline installing, configuring and using ESMTP to handle your outgoing mail. This will allow you to send your email, via Mutt, through gmail, your ISP, or some other mail relay that you have access to.

Slackware 12: The anti-'buntu

Filed under
Reviews

Slackware is the oldest surviving Linux distribution; its first version came out in 1993. Version 12 was recently released. As its Wikipedia entry notes, it's got a reputation for sacrificing ease-of-use (in terms of configuration and package management tools provided by the distribution) in favor of letting the end user configure the system and its software by herself.

QEMU: easy and fast processor emulator

Filed under
Software

DPofD: QEMU lets you emulate a machine —in other words, you can run a virtual computer on top of your real computer. This makes it perfect for trying and testing the latest release of a distribution, running older operating systems, or just testing.

What open source does to people

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: The notion of "transparency" that comes with applying an OSS style to one's business model makes for more than a slick marketing slide. It permeates the software company's culture and drastically transforms relationships across-the-board.

Is open source running out of ideas?

Filed under
OSS

CBR: Gianugo Rabellino suggests that while it is good news that significant amounts are being invested in open source vendors, there has been a decrease in the amount of funds invested in Series A rounds, suggesting that “the VC industry has filled the checkerboard and has moved to something else as far as startups are concerned”.

Fun Opera User Facts

Filed under
Software

CyberNetNews: Unlike most companies who collect the stats, they wanted to share some of the interesting findings they saw. So what could they have possibly found? These are the ones that I found interesting:

Features Ubuntu is Lacking

Filed under
Ubuntu

sheehantu: In my last post I mentioned why I chose Ubuntu over Windows. I stand by my comments, however I would like to shed some light where Ubuntu and Linux need a little work:

K3b is Just Swell for CD and DVD Burning in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

Moving to Freedom: When I wrote about using Brasero for CD burning in GNOME a few months ago, I realized that the KDE app K3b was out there and probably pretty good. I also figured I’d want to try K3b soon enough when I needed more options and flexibility. Well it didn’t take many burning jobs to get there.

aKademy 2007: Education Day

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The long-anticipated Education Day at aKademy 2007 opened at 9 am on Monday, 3rd July with an introduction by Anne-Marie Mahfouf, maintainer of the KDE-Edu suite of educational applications.

Linux: CFS Scheduler v19, Group Scheduling

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: The biggest user-visible change in -v19 is reworked sleeper fairness: it's similar in behavior to -v18 but works more consistently across nice levels. Fork-happy workloads (like kernel builds) should behave better as well.

Zenwalk Live 4.6 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: Zenwalk Live has been updated against Zenwalk Linux 4.6 and this LiveCD distribution now features Xfce 4.4.1 with notification support, the Xfce Thunar file manager can now handle video thumbnails, and many new Xfce 4.4 panel plug-ins have been added or updated.

Gimmie ultimate desktop organizer for Linux

Filed under
Software

nixcraft: Over the last few years concept of desktop organizer software applications becomes quite popular. Gimmie is a unique desktop organizer for Linux. It’s designed to allow easy interaction with all the applications, contacts, documents and other things you use every day.

Tetris for Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla links: Now you can enjoy the super classic video game within your favorite browser. Xultris is a Firefox extension developed by mackers that brings Tetris addiction to your favorite browser.

Intel and Novell Become Patrons of KDE

Filed under
KDE

the dot: Intel and Novell have each become corporate Patrons of KDE. Their exceptional financial commitment to the KDE e.V. helps the project with community events, infrastructure and developer meetings.

Does Solaris need to be better Linux than Linux?

Filed under
OS

daniweb: Hot on the heels of JavaFX, taking on the likes of Microsoft Silverlight and Adobe Flash, Sun looks set to formally unveil its plans for Project Indiana this week and attack the Linux developer heartlands.

Stable kernels 2.6.20.15 and 2.6.21.6

LWN: The 2.6.20.15 and 2.6.21.6 stable kernels have been released; each contains a single fix for a security problem in the netfilter H323 connection tracking code.

Girls get grounding in gigabytes

Filed under
Sci/Tech

telegram.com: The group of 10- to 14-year-olds was busy installing and configuring the Linux operating system on computers they had finished building.

Say It Ain't So

Filed under
Microsoft

microsoft-watch: I've delayed more than a day blogging about Microsoft's GPLv3 assertions, for my loss of words. Microsoft just claimed the world is flat and expects you to believe it.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • Secure your Elasticsearch cluster and avoid ransomware
    Last week, news came out that unprotected MongoDB databases are being actively compromised: content copied and replaced by a message asking for a ransom to get it back. As The Register reports: Elasticsearch is next. Protecting access to Elasticsearch by a firewall is not always possible. But even in environments where it is possible, many admins are not protecting their databases. Even if you cannot use a firewall, you can secure connection to Elasticsearch by using encryption. Elasticsearch by itself does not provide any authentication or encryption possibilities. Still, there are many third-party solutions available, each with its own drawbacks and advantages.
  • Resolve to Follow These 8 Steps for Better Data Security in 2017
    Getting physically fit is a typical New Year's resolution. Given that most of us spend more time online than in a gym, the start of the new year also might be a great time to improve your security “fitness.” As with physical fitness challenges, the biggest issue with digital security is always stagnation. That is, if you don't move and don't change, atrophy sets in. In physical fitness, atrophy is a function of muscles not being exercised. In digital fitness, security risks increase when you fail to change passwords, update network systems and adopt improved security technology. Before long, your IT systems literally become a “sitting duck.” Given the volume of data breaches that occurred in 2016, it is highly likely that everyone reading this has had at least one breach of their accounts compromised in some way, such as their Yahoo data account. Hackers somewhere may have one of the passwords you’ve used at one point to access a particular site or service. If you're still using that same password somewhere, in a way that can connect that account to you, that's a non-trivial risk. Changing passwords is the first of eight security resolutions that can help to improve your online security fitness in 2017. Click through this eWEEK slide show to discover the rest.
  • Pwn2Own 2017 Takes Aim at Linux, Servers and Web Browsers
    10th anniversary edition of Pwn2Own hacking contest offers over $1M in prize money to security researchers across a long list of targets including Virtual Machines, servers, enterprise applications and web browsers. Over the last decade, the Zero Day Initiative's (ZDI) annual Pwn2Own competition has emerged to become one of the premiere events on the information security calendar and the 2017 edition does not look to be any different. For the tenth anniversary of the Pwn2Own contest, ZDI, now owned and operated by Trend Micro, is going farther than ever before, with more targets and more prize money available for security researchers to claim by successfully executing zero-day exploits.
  • 'Factorio' is another game that was being hit by key scammers
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Red Hat News

Development News: LLVM, New Releases, and GCC

PulseAudio 10 and Virtual GPU in Linux

  • PulseAudio 10 Coming Soon, Using Memfd Shared Memory By Default
    It's been a half year since the debut of PulseAudio 9.0 while the release of PulseAudio 10 is coming soon. PulseAudio 9.99.1 development release was tagged earlier this month, then usually after x.99.2 marks the official release, so it won't be much longer now before seeing PulseAudio 10.0 begin to appear in Linux distributions.
  • Experimenting With Virtual GPU Support On Linux 4.10 + Libvirt
    With the Linux 4.10 kernel having initial but limited Intel Graphics Virtualization Tech support, you can begin playing with the experimental virtual GPU support using the upstream kernel and libvirt.