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Thursday, 22 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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NetBSD 4: A Force to Be Reckoned With?

Filed under
BSD

internetnews.com: NetBSD 4 is finally out, boasting a long list of feature and speed improvements in the open source operating system. The NetBSD 4.0 comes nearly two years after NetBSD 3.0 was released. As with earlier versions, NetBSD 4 continues to competitively position its BSD variant against its BSD, Linux and Unix peers.

Dell's Ubuntu 7.10 Offering - Technical Details

Filed under
Ubuntu

direct2dell: Now that we have shared that Ubuntu 7.10 is available for sale on select Dell systems, I'd like to take the opportunity to give an update on what customers can expect with this offering. Most of the Ubuntu 7.04 technical details are still valid for this release, but there are a number of changes that I'd like to point out:

Flightgear 1.0.0 Released

Filed under
Gaming

freegamer.blogspot: After more than 11 years of development, Flightgear 1.0 has arrived. Flightgear can be played on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, as well as other *nix platforms including FreeBSD, Solaris, and IRIX. Flightgear is one of the first major Free Software games and has become a flight simulator that rivals it's commercial counterparts.

Foolish Forecast: Red Hat in the Black

Filed under
Linux

Motley Fool: Longtime Linux platform leader Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) will don a fresh fedora on Thursday night to report its third-quarter 2008 results. Sales and gross margins are on the rise, but Red Hat keeps scaling up its operational staff, so the bottom-line results don't always follow suit.

The VC Floodgates Open for Drupal and Acquia

Filed under
Drupal

computerworlduk blogs: A little while back, the creator of the Drupal open source web collaboration and publishing platform, Dries Buytaert, announced that he was setting up a company alongside the project. Now that company has just got a lot of dosh:

Open Office standards row heats up

Filed under
OSS

The Register: Microsoft is facing growing criticism of its bid to have Office Open XML (OOXML) accepted as an international standard ahead of a crucial vote by the ISO scheduled for February.

Also: KOffice's stance against OOXML more practical than political, developer says

Why Linux didn't win in 2007 and why it won't in 2008 either

Filed under
Linux

seopher: 2007 was touted as 'the year for Linux' and indeed the first quarter looked promising but things never really took off. Why is that?

Ulteo plans free and paying subscriptions for online OpenOffice service

Filed under
Software

zdnet blogs: Ulteo’s online OpenOffice service will be officially launched to the marketplace to a limited number of subscribers in the first half of 2008, the company’s CEO said.

Opera 9.25 released

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: We released 9.25 today, which mainly addresses a few security issues - it is a recommended upgrade for all those running the latest stable releases.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install KDE 4 RC 2 on Ubuntu 7.10 (screenshot tour)

  • One click monitor power-down for Linux
  • Enhancing cluster quorum with QDisk
  • Short Tip: Add Plasma widgets to the panel in KDE 4
  • HowTo: Rename Multiple Files Without A Script
  • Create an MP3 file server using Amarok and ObsidianMusic
  • How to Install Vmware Server in Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon)
  • Monitor Multiple Logs in a Single Shell with MultiTail for Linux

Ubuntu 7.10 vs. Early Ubuntu 8.04 Benchmarks

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: Ubuntu 8.04 Alpha 2 is due out tomorrow, and while we'll have more extensive testing as the Hardy Heron release nears in April, today we are publishing our first -- very initial -- benchmarks of Ubuntu 8.04 using the 12-19-2007 daily build and comparing these results to Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon. These tests are focused upon OpenGL gaming, encoding, disk, and memory performance.

First Looks at Firefox 3.0 Beta 2

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • First Look at Firefox 3.0 Beta 2

  • First look: Firefox 3 beta 2 officially released
  • Firefox 3 Beta 2 review
  • Firefox 3 beta 2 Arrives with More Speed and Less Memory

A Taste Of Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

junauza.blogspot: I have tried and tested almost all major Linux distros but not yet Mandriva. Fortunately, I had a not-so-busy weekend so I finally had my hands on Mandriva 2008.

Katapulting away from the menu

Filed under
Software

ITtoolbox blogs: One of the programs that, when I first saw it in Kubuntu, I thought that I would never have any use for. After using it for a bit I now miss it on systems that don't have it. That program is called Katapult and it does more than just Katapult you into a program launch.

Linux Photographers, LightZone Is Here

Filed under
Software

softpedia: Light Crafts, the producing company of LightZone, announced yesterday the availability of a beta release for the photo-editing software. With the help of this version, Linux users now have all the LightZone tools for editing and improving digital photos that Windows and Mac users have already had.

Choosing a Linux Distro, Part 2: Favorite Flavors

Filed under
Linux

linuxinsider: "Each Linux distro comes with its own powers and problems, and to say which one you should use would be tantamount to answering, 'What kind of car should I drive?'" said Scott Whitney of Journyx. Whitney has a strong view about not getting too fanatical over the differences in Linux distros. The particular flavor you select will matter less than the fact that you are not using the Mac or Windows platforms.

Simple, fast administration with Webmin

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Linux has so many tools, settings, parameters, and configuration files to learn that administering your box can be a challenge. Webmin, a Web-based comprehensive administration tool for Linux, can help you get on your way.

Restoring and updating the ASUS Eee Linux PC

iTWire: Well, I’ve been hornswaggled. My lovely brand-new ASUS Eee from Myer may have been a shop-soiled demo model. It wasn’t a virgin system but one that had played the field with many. Never worry: here’s how to take the ASUS Eee back to the complete factory image at any time, along with how to update the apps and Xandros Linux distro that it uses.

Review: Pardus Linux 2007.2

Filed under
Linux

raiden's realm: Pardus Linux is a distribution built from scratch rather than from any one particular existing distribution. Born in 2005 through funding and development provided by the Scientific & Technological Research Council of Turkey, it's grown quickly and become a distribution worth taking a good long look at.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Differences between European and US adoption of open source

  • Ubuntu Releases Alpha Version of Server 8.04
  • Embracing PCLinuxOS and Open Source
  • Linux defector says RHEL zero, Sun Solaris hero
  • Liferea: an RSS reader for GNOME
  • Tour of the Ubuntu Applications (2007)
  • Review: Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon takes on Mac OS X Leopard for the OS of the Year Part 1
  • Tech charities to consider this giving season
  • Video: Alan Cox and the state of free software
  • Klik2 RC to be around in February 2008
  • Suing Over Open Source
  • AGEIA Responds, Talks PhysX On Linux
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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.