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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Exclusive First Review: Asus Eee PC 701

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

laptopmag.com: The Eee PC may be designed to appeal to children and older customers, but it should also tempt anyone looking for a lightweight budget PC that weighs next to nothing and connects to the Internet easily. It's ten times simpler to use than any Windows machine, starts up twice as fast (no crapware!), and is only about a fifth of the cost of other systems in its weight class.

Linux losing to Windows. Time to reassess how to compete in the server market

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: A few years ago market share data clearly demonstrated Linux server growth outpacing Windows server growth. Today, Linux server growth has apparently slowed while Windows is picking up, according to IDC. Why? The rate of migration from Unix to Linux has slowed.

And: Linux Losing Market Share to Windows Server

Vixta: Nice concept, incomplete execution

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Vixta is a new Linux distribution, first released only last month, based on the not-yet-released Fedora 8. Its main objective is to emulate the visual aspects of Microsoft Vista. Version 095 contains the newest, and sometimes unstable, versions of software.

Govt migrates 23 entities to open source platforms - Venezuela

Filed under
OSS

bnamericas.com: Venezuela's government has migrated a total of 23 public institutions to open source platforms, the government said on its website.

My Distribution is the most updated.

Filed under
Linux

techzone: October is generally the month when major distributions like OpenSUSE, Ubuntu, Mandriva etc make a release. I wanted to check which of the major distributions keep themselves updated and the release of Gimp 2.4.0 on 24th October 2007. In this article I will list the version of Gimp present in various common distributions, the source of different versions is Distrowatch.

Open source vs. commercial software

Filed under
OSS

LinuxWorld: Open source software initially was a head-scratcher: “How can you make money selling something for free?” But once open source advocates clarified the meaning of free – “Free as in speech, not as in beer” – the open source economy took off.

Also: VMware vs. Xen vs. Microsoft
And: Novell NetWare vs. Microsoft networking

Open source: The most disruptive influence in IT today

Filed under
OSS

Enterprise Linux Log: For some it is gospel. To others, it is completely mind-bending and new. The fact of the matter is clear: Open source software, Linux included, is quickly becoming the disruptive force in IT. Some would say it has already.

ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Why Ubuntu (Still) Sucks - Part 5: Epilogue

  • Xubuntu 7.10 (gutsy gibbon) Screenshots Tour
  • Tweak Ubuntu Software Sources To Stay Bleeding Edge

Using The Avant Window Navigator (AWN) On Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up the Avant Window Navigator (AWN) on Fedora 7. The result is an eye candy, dock-like bar at the bottom of the screen as a replacement for the standard gnome-panel.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Hyperic First Enterprise Systems Management Vendor To Support Ubuntu’s Gutsy
  • Gibbon Release

  • Hot Drives: Dealing with SMART data on OpenSuse 10.3
  • Linus Torvalds on gcc thread-safety
  • Linux Security Modules Maintainers
  • Novell cries Wolfe
  • Spanish computer shops to sell Free Software
  • Compiler Misoptimizations

Asus Eee PC Initial Hands On and Video Review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

tabletpcreview.com: The Asus Eee PC 701 4G is the new affordable ultraportable notebook that's bound to be on many consumer's Christmas wishlist this year. Retailing for somewhere between $299 and $399, the Eee PC isn't exactly a workhorse, but it will do just about every basic task you'd need from a laptop. Our initial hands-on actually proves it does more than we expected.

apps, tips, & howtos

Filed under
Software
HowTos
  • Can’t Think of a Color Scheme? Agave Can

  • HeX: Using Darkstat & Ntop
  • cups and printers stopping
  • Command Line Progress Bar
  • Sunbird 0.7 is Impressive
  • aMSN - an alternative to Pidgin for Windows Live Messenger
  • Hide Partition Icons From Your Ubuntu Desktop
  • Mouse pointer disappears after switching users
  • Ajust LCD brightness from command line
  • Clock skew error
  • Splitting tar archives on the fly

Full Circle Magazine Issue 6 is OUT!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Issue 6 of Full Circle Magazine is now available. Highlights this issue include:
* Step-by-Step Ubuntu Feisty > Gutsy upgrade
* How-To : Run Photoshop plugins in GIMP, Set up Samba and Scribus pt.6.
* Top 5 - Racing Games.

The Unreasonable Stance: Linux sucks for desktops

Filed under
Linux

crunchgear.com: Linux is great. Really, it is. I used to use it all the time as a teenager when I got into programming. But now that I’ve matured (a little) and fallen into the world of Apple, I can see that Linux on a desktop PC is not a reality.

Five Reasons for Making the Switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

enterpriseitplanet: Hardly a day passes where Linux isn't mentioned in IT circles and by techno-geeks everywhere. But why should you care? In this article, we'll explain why moving to Linux is a smart move for your business and your bottom line.

Who really won in Microsoft vs. the EU?

Filed under
Microsoft

linux-watch: My colleague over at Microsoft Watch, Joe Wilcox, declared that "Microsoft bowed before the EU and took its whipping." Eh, after a couple of days to look at the decision, I don't think so. At best, I'd say the European Union got the more favorable end of a draw.

Photoshop For Linux? Don't Hold Your Breath

Filed under
Linux
Software

Serdar Yegulalp: There's a few applications that would help make Linux more of a mainstream OS, but don't expect to see them ported to Linux anytime soon. One of the least discussed in this fashion? Adobe Photoshop.

What Is It Like Migrating Mission Critical Servers from Paid Linux (RHEL) to Free Linux (CentOS)?

Filed under
Linux

eWeek: Stephane Saux, IT Director of SFGate.com, the Web site of the San Francisco Chronicle, begins a series of questions and answers about a recent Linux migration project.

A First Tussle With Linux's iPhone Killer: The OpenMoko Neo1973

Filed under
Sci/Tech

wired: The Neo1973 is the first physical manifestation of a grand idea -- a new breed of wireless handheld built for the open-source age. Using Linux, it is the first release from the OpenMoko project, a group working to create a fully open source software platform for smartphones, a community-driven alternative to, say, the iPhone.

Red Hat: time to come into the 21st century

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Just yesterday morning I was admiring the features of Fedora Core 5 on an iBook at the home of a man who is in many ways my Linux guru. He has the distribution running on various computers all made by Apple and I was quite impressed with what the developers have managed to achieve.

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
  • Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing
    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.