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Thursday, 29 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Top 10 Ubuntu Tips

Filed under
HowTos

1) How to restart GNOME without rebooting computer
A) Press ‘Ctrl + Alt + Backspace’
or
Cool sudo /etc/init.d/gdm restart

Living in the command line, for linux: Making it Possible

Filed under
HowTos

Most Linux distributions install to have 7 virtual consoles, generally #7 (F7) is used by Xorg/X11. Though working entirely from the command line does involve a better knowledge of some things, it can be a quicker and more practical work environment for some who are running commands or scripts or writing programs most of their day.

Expect More Downtime

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Site News

If you are a regular to tuxmachines, you have probably noticed the unusual amount of downtime the past 18 hours. I've known for several weeks that a change in server system was imminent and it appears I can no longer delay the upgrade. Expect tuxmachines to be down on and off over the next couple of days beginning tonight.

Stable kernel 2.6.20.2 Released

Filed under
Linux

The second stable update to the 2.6.20 kernel is out. "It contains a metric buttload of bugfixes and security updates, so all 2.6.20 users are recommended to upgrade." They are not joking: there's about 100 patches in this update.

More Here.

Firefox Password Flaw Still Open?

Filed under
Moz/FF

Is a flaw in the Firefox browser fixed or not? A security research claims that it's not. Mozilla says it is. Mozilla claimed that it fixed the flaw in its most recent Firefox 2.0.0.2 update. Chapin doesn't quite agree.

Publishing Writer documents on the Web

Filed under
HowTos

Although OpenOffice.org has an HTML/XHTML export feature, it is not up to the snuff when it comes to turning Writer documents into clean HTML files. Instead, this feature turns even the simplest Writer documents into HTML gobbledygook. So what options do you have if you want to convert your Writer documents into tidy HTML pages or wiki-formatted text files?

Open Source Means You Have to Be Better

Filed under
OSS

If you don't trust your customers and have to treat them like criminals and have to continually tighten the screws, if you have to keep everything a big secret, perhaps the problem is not them derned defective customers, but your approach to running a business.

The quest for a nice Gnome audio burning app

Filed under
Software

With a new version of Mandriva, 2007.1 Spring edition, coming out soon, I decided to take a look at the choice of default applications installed. One of the things a lot of people agreed about, was that the program gcdmaster (a front-end for cdrdao), probably was not the best choice as an audio burning application. For data CD and DVD burning, there is nautilus-cd-burner, but what would be the best choice for music CDs?

Joe Barr rips proprietary software vendor a new one

Filed under
OSS

It seems to be a trend among some proprietary software vendors: attacking open source with lies. The latest appears in this week's Network World's Face-off, which features a slop-bucket full of self-serving hogwash by Ipswitch's Roger Greene entitled "Don't trust your network to open source." If ignorance were a crime, Greene would be swinging from the gallows.

Hans Reiser to Stand Trial for Murder

Filed under
Reiser

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Julie Conger said Friday afternoon that there is sufficient evidence to order Oakland software developer Hans Reiser to stand trial on charges that he murdered his wife, Nina Reiser, last year.

California Bill Makes XML-based Documentation a Requirement for State Agencies

Filed under
OSS

Originally, reports stated that bill AB 1668 would require state agencies to use the open document format (ODF) spearheaded by the group responsible for OpenOffice, but this is not true.

Set up Logical Volume Manager in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

You can use the Logical Volume Manager (LVM) in Linux to create virtual drives, and when used with RAID, LVM provides redundancy. Vincent Danen's tip will show you how to create your first volume.

The preliminary hearing for Hans Reiser scheduled to resume this morning

Filed under
Reiser

The preliminary hearing for an Oakland man accused in the murder of his wife is set to continue this morning (9:00). A judge will decide whether there's enough evidence to try Hans Reiser for the murder of Nina Reiser.

Useful Commands For The Linux Command Line

Filed under
HowTos

This short guide shows some important commands for your daily work on the Linux command line. Some include arch, cat, cp, date, and df.

K3b enters new era with approaching 1.0 release

Filed under
Software

One of free software's premier applications, KDE's CD and DVD burning suite K3b, is about to hit the big 1-0. This milestone touts rewritten DVD video ripping and a refocused interface design. The new release represents a level of feature-completeness and stability that surpasses all previous K3b releases and, perhaps, all free software competitors.

Understanding your Linux daemons

Filed under
HowTos

A Unix daemon is a program that runs in the “background,” enabling you to do other work in the “foreground,” and is independent of control from a terminal. Daemons can either be started by a process, such as a system startup script, where there is no controlling terminal, or by a user at a terminal without “tying up” that terminal as the daemon runs. But which daemons can you safely play with? Which should you leave running?

Open source becomes political wedge issue

Filed under
OSS

Last year, in Massachusetts, we saw open source being used as a political football. But the underlying issue in that case was technological, the state's adoption of ODF as a standard format. Now, in England, we're again seeing open source being used by politicians.

Using truecrypt-intaller to help install Truecrypt for Debian

Filed under
HowTos

Truecrypt is an Open Source disk encryption software which uses a concept of containers to store encrypted data. The nice thing about Truecrypt is that the containers (or volumes) can be read transparently under Linux and Windows. Here are step by step instructions how to use the truecrypt-installer utilities to get Truecrypt running with minimum of effort.

Use the “CUBE” with XGL and Compiz on your Suse Laptop

Filed under
HowTos

I got my laptop on Friday two weeks ago. One of the first things I did was partition the drive, and install OpenSuse 10.2, 64bit version. The installation went smoothly and everything (including WLAN) worked perfect. In this workshop I want to explain the installation of the 3D cube using XGL and Compiz.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.10 Doesn't Change Much With Performance, Clear Linux Still Leads In Most Tests

Given yesterday's Ubuntu 16.10 final beta release ahead of the official "Yakkety Yak" debut in two weeks, I decided to run some benchmarks of Ubuntu 16.10 compared to Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS on the same system plus also throwing in the Intel Clear Linux distribution given it tends to be one of the most performant. For those that haven't yet tried out Ubuntu 16.10 nor followed its development, GCC 6.2 is now the default compiler in place of GCC 5.4 from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. Mesa 12.0.3 provides the stock graphics drivers and Linux 4.8 is the stock kernel. Read more Also: DDR4 Memory Speed Tests With The Core i7 6800K On Ubuntu Linux

Mozilla's Rust 1.12

  • Announcing Rust 1.12
    The Rust team is happy to announce the latest version of Rust, 1.12. Rust is a systems programming language with the slogan “fast, reliable, productive: pick three.” As always, you can install Rust 1.12 from the appropriate page on our website, and check out the detailed release notes for 1.12 on GitHub. 1361 patches were landed in this release.
  • Rust 1.12 Programming Language Released
    Rust 1.12 has been released as the newest version of this popular programming language with a focus on "fast, reliable, productive: pick three."

Linux Devices

  • Raspberry Pi Foundation Unveils New LXDE-Based Desktop for Raspbian Called PIXEL
    Today, September 28, 2016, Raspberry Pi Foundation's Simon Long proudly unveiled a new desktop environment for the Debian-based Raspbian GNU/Linux operating system for Raspberry Pi devices. Until today, Raspbian shiped with the well-known and lightweight LXDE desktop environment, which looks pretty much the same as on any other Linux-based distribution out there that is built around LXDE (Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment). But Simon Long, a UX engineer working for Raspberry Pi Foundation was hired to make it better, transform it into something that's more appealing to users.
  • MintBox Mini updated with faster AMD SoC and 8GB RAM
    CompuLab’s Linux Mint flavored MintBox Mini Pro mini-PC updates the Mini with an AMD A10 Micro-6700T, plus BT 4.0, mini-PCIe, and twice the RAM and storage. The CompuLab built, $395 MintBox Mini Pro, which ships with the Linux Mint 18 Cinnamon distribution, updates the $295 MintBox Mini with a lot more performance and features in the same compact 108 x 83 x 24mm footprint. That’s considerably smaller than earlier collaborations between CompuLab and the Linux Mint project, such as the circa-2013 MintBox 2.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro
    MintBox Mini Pro The new model is called “Mintbox Mini Pro”, it’s just as small as the original Mintbox Mini but with much better specifications.

4 of the Best Linux Distros for Windows Users

For the past year Microsoft has offered free upgrades to their latest operating system, Windows 10. This was mainly due to the fact that Windows 8 and 8.1 were poorly received, especially when compared to Windows 7. Unfortunately the free upgrade period has passed, so if you want to give Windows 10 a try, you’ll have to dig into your wallet to do it. If your faith in the tech giant has waned over the years, you’re not alone. The latest versions of Windows have all been heavily criticized, proving that they have been a far cry from the world dominance of Windows XP. If you’re one of the many people turned off by the latest iterations of Windows, the jump to Linux might look very appealing. Unfortunately, a new OS often comes with a steep learning curve. Windows, with the exception of the fumble that was 8, has more or less looked and behaved the same for years. Having to re-learn everything can be a daunting task, one that could pressure you into staying with Windows forever. However, you do have options. There are many different distributions of Linux out there, with some aiming to replicate the look and feel of Windows. The goal of this is to make transitioning relatively painless. With Linux boasting improved hardware support, long term stability and a wider range of software applications, there is no better time to try it out! Read more Related (Microsoft exodus): Microsoft Applications and Services chief Qi Lu leaves the company<