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About Tux Machines

Friday, 30 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debian 6.0: LXDE Menus srlinuxx 1 15/09/2011 - 3:24pm
Story How To Create A Debian Wheezy (Testing) OpenVZ Template falko 15/09/2011 - 8:19am
Story Gnome 3.2 srlinuxx 15/09/2011 - 4:27am
Story Perens tries to bridge gap on copyright srlinuxx 15/09/2011 - 4:23am
Story Dyne:bolic GNU/Linux hits version 3 srlinuxx 15/09/2011 - 4:20am
Story Distro review : Dragora GNU/Linux srlinuxx 14/09/2011 - 11:29pm
Story Why You Should Join Diaspora Now, Like Your Freedom Depends On It srlinuxx 14/09/2011 - 10:32pm
Story Events I’d like to see srlinuxx 14/09/2011 - 10:30pm
Story Hands-on with Windows 8: srlinuxx 2 14/09/2011 - 10:17pm
Story Revolutionizing desktops without causing user revolts srlinuxx 14/09/2011 - 10:13pm

Shopping with the Mozilla Amazon Browser

Filed under
Software

Amazon.com is the most popular online retailer. While you can, of course, access the site with any browser, developer Fabio Serra has created Mozilla Amazon Browser (MAB), a browser-based application that relies on Mozilla's XML User Interface Language (XUL) technology to implement its graphical user interface.

Linux vs. Windows: Which is Most Secure?

Filed under
OS

I’m more secure on Linux than I am on Windows. My primary desktop is on a Macbook Pro – the best computer I’ve ever owned, without any doubt. I consider myself very open-minded and will always give credit where it’s due. Heck, some of my best friends use Windows.

Firefox Goes Where Few Browsers Have Gone Before

Filed under
Moz/FF

In 2002 the Mozilla Foundation released Mozilla 1.0, finally delivering on the promise of an open-source browser descended from the original Netscape Navigator browser code.

But while Mozilla 1.0 received many kudos from reviewers (including eWEEK Labs), it failed to make much of a dent in the 96 percent market share that Microsoft's Internet Explorer enjoyed at the time.

Happy Birthday, Penguin Pete's

Filed under
Web

Penguin Pete celebrates his site's first birthday today. We congratulate him on a most excellent site. His articles are funny, intelligent, informative, gramatically correct, and sometimes controversial. I enjoy Penguin Pete's site, frequently link to it, and hope it will be around for a long time to come.

In an article on his site today he discusses the first year and his top stories:

Linux Musings drift in from China

Filed under
Linux

Could Linux be the nearly perfect solution to the computing ills in China? Well, a little yes, and lots of no.

Notes on Submitting Content

Filed under
Site News

Lord knows I appreciate all the 'news submissions' I can get. In fact, I've often thought of asking around for a 'Number One' to help me run the site in that area. But I have a few notes for those submitting, especially if you've noticed your submission not published.

Pharmacy system using Ubuntu to fight AIDS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Written in Java and released under the GPL, iDART (intelligent Dispensing of Antiretroviral Treatment) is a pharmacy system designed for use at antiretroviral (ARV) pharmacies in the public health sector. Initially distributed only as software, it was generally implemented on machines using Windows.

A few more (cheaper!) options for burning LPs

Filed under
Hardware
Software

Recently, we described how to copy LPs, 45s and 78s to CD using the new Crosley Songwriter CD Recorder. It's an easy-to-use, $400 nostalgia-theme piece that does the job without a computer, but the hefty price is hard to ignore. But what about the computer-savvy person who doesn't have a turntable? Or the turntable owner who doesn't want to buy the Songwriter just to turn vinyl into CD?

The Importance Of Free Open Standards In The Evolution Of The Web: Tim Berners-Lee Report

Filed under
Web

The Science And Engineering Of The Common Good - The Importance Of Free Open Standards For A Healthy Evolution Of The Web: Tim Berners-Lee reports to the United States House of Representatives.

Baby's First Laptop

Filed under
Ubuntu

My baby is turning 1. It's time to get her a laptop.

This is pretty self-evident to me, but not to the American Academy of Pediatrics, which recommends "no screen time" for children under 2 and at most 1 or 2 hours daily for kids.

How To Install VMware Server On A Fedora Core 6 Desktop

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install VMware Server on a Fedora Core 6 desktop system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system.

dockers for linux

Filed under
Software

If you run KDE, you aren't just stuck with the standard "kicker" panel to operate as your app launcher and taskbar. There are a bunch of nice panel replacements that will spice up your desktop nicely. The ones that I've used and tested are kooldock, kxdocker and the nkotb kiba-dock (NB. the only place with anything useful on that site is the forum).

Display system Information Using Phpsysinfo

Filed under
HowTos

phpSysInfo is a customizable PHP script that parses various files in /proc and displays them. It will display information about system facts like Uptime, CPU, Memory, SCSI, IDE, PCI, Ethernet, Floppy, and Video. It now has full internationalization support along with customizable templates.

Phpsysinfo Requirements

Web server (apache2) with php4 or later support

Backup alternative: sbackup

Filed under
HowTos

sbackup is a backup program emerging from a Summer of Code project. It was dedicated to tightly integrate with Ubuntu but can also run on other platforms. In contrast to often used backup services like Amanda sbackup focuses on the user of the machine.

A quick install of the Opera browser on Feisty, the next version of Ubuntu.

Filed under
HowTos

A test install of Opera 9.10 to see if all is well on the Opera/Ubuntu Feisty compatibility front. In this story flashplugin-nonfree, sun-java6-plugin and sun-java6-jre are installed, all available in the repositories of Ubuntu Feisty (universe multiverse).

sudo apt-get install flashplugin-nonfree, sun-java6-plugin sun-java6-jre

Review: dyne:bolic 2.4.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This distribution is about more than creating another version of Linux. It has a strong political and philosophical impetus behind it. I will let their website explain it:

dyne:bolic is RASTA software released free under the GNU General Public License.

Ubuntu 5.10 reaches end-of-life

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu announced the release of 5.10 almost 18 months ago, on October 13th. As with the earlier releases, Ubuntu committed to ongoing security and critical fixes for a period of 18 months. The support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 5.10 will reach end of life on Friday April 13th 2007.

The Feeds and Speeds of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

Filed under
Linux

While Red Hat, like many other operating system and more complete software stack providers, wants to pitch the latest release of its software as a major change in packaging that will broaden the appeal of its products, the fact remains that for many customers, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 is a new and substantially improved operating system that will be sold on its own merits of features, performanc

Beryl 0.2.0 Released

Filed under
Software

Beryl 0.2.0 is a complete overhaul of Beryl. The last stable release 0.1, featured a very fun, and eye-candy based compositing window manager. However, since it’s release, many parts of beryl have been rewritten, replaced, or simply dropped. The Beryl team has put in numerous hours to bring you this release.

Fun with Ubuntu -- Top Ten Next Names, Part 2

Filed under
Ubuntu

Last week I gave you half of my Top Ten Names for Ubuntu releases. As a reminder, they were: 'pissy porcupine', 'bitty bat', 'virtual viper', 'talky tortoise', and (my favorite) 'kinky kangaroo'. Now here are the rest.

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More in Tux Machines

New Releases

  • Security-Oriented Qubes OS 3.2 Improves the Integrated Management Infrastructure
    Today, September 29, 2016, Joanna Rutkowska announced the general availability of the second point release of the Qubes OS 3 stable series of the security-oriented and open-source Linux-based computer operating system. Qubes OS 3.2 is a maintenance release, which means that it mostly adds general fixes and improvements to various of the distribution's core components and functionalities, including the integrated management infrastructure that was introduced as part of the previous update, Qubes 3.1, allowing users to also manage the "insides" of a virtual machine.
  • Alpine Linux 3.4.4 Is Out, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.4.22 LTS, OpenSSL Patches
    Today, September 28, 2016, Alpine Linux creator and lead developer Natanael Cop has the pleasure of announcing the release of the fourth maintenance update to the latest stable Alpine Linux 3.4 server-oriented operating system series. Alpine Linux 3.4.4 is out as the most advanced version, powered by the recently released, long-term supported Linux 4.4.22 kernel and bringing up-to-date components to make your Alpine Linux-based server(s) more stable and reliable than ever. Most of the core components have been updated, but the most important one is OpenSSL 1.0.2j, which received the latest security fixes, just like in the rest of the GNU/Linux distros.

Leftovers: Software

  • Web Publishing and Development: Free Tools Abound
    Are you involved in DevOps and web development, or are you aiming to be? If so, you're probably very aware of many of the tools from the open standards and open source arenas that can make your work easier. Still, these are always spreading out at a fast clip and there are some applications and tools that are rarely discussed. Here at OStatic, we try to regularly update our collections focused on them. In this post, you'll find our latest roundup of free resources for web development that range from complete online courses available for free to unsung applications.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6.1 Released
  • Skype for Linux Alpha 1.9 Adds a Dark Theme, Notification Muting
  • GNOME Calendar Pencils In Great New Features
    GNOME Calendar is one of the few decent desktop calendaring apps available on Linux — and it's going to get better.
  • The future of GNOME Calendar
    Today, the Calendar Team had the first meeting in history. Isaque, Lapo, Renata, Vamsi and I attended it, and the meeting was extremely productive! In fact, we were able to sketch out the general direction that GNOME Calendar will head towards.

More Android Leftovers

  • ​Google beats back Oracle again in Java Android case
    To recap, Oracle claimed the 37 Java application programming interface (API) packages Google used to develop Android are covered by copyright. Of course, that's not really the issue. True, the the US Federal Circuit Court of Appeals foolishly ruled that APIs could be copyrighted. But the US District Court for the Northern District of California ruled in May 2016 that Google's use of the Java APIs were not subject to copyright licensing fees. Instead, Android's use of the APIs was covered by "fair use."
  • Google’s Open Source Fuchsia OS: The Mystery Linux Distro
    Few things are more tantalizing than a good mystery, and Google is making waves for an open source-centric mystery that may end up having profound implications. It all started in August when an extensive and unusual code repository for a new operating system called Fuchsia was discovered online, and now the growing source code set is on GitHub. Thus far, Google officials have been mostly mum on the aim of this operating system, although they have made a few things clear in chat forums. Two developers listed on Fuchsia's GitHub page — Christopher Anderson and Brian Swetland — are known for their work with embedded systems. The Verge, among other sites, has made a few logical deductions about the possible embedded systems focus for Fuchsia: “Looking into Fuchsia's code points gives us a few clues. For example, the OS is built on Magenta, a “medium-sized microkernel” that is itself based on a project called LittleKernel, which is designed to be used in embedded systems,” the site reports. The GitHub postings that confirm that Fuchsia is based on Magenta are particularly notable because Magenta has had applications in the embedded systems space. Here are some direct quotes: "Magenta is a new kernel that powers the Fuchsia OS. Magenta is composed of a microkernel as well as a small set of userspace services, drivers, and libraries necessary for the system to boot, talk to hardware, load userspace processes and run them, etc. Fuchsia builds a much larger OS on top of this foundation."
  • As Blackberry pulls out of handset business it has some big patent strategy calls to make

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Budgie-Remix Makes Progress With Ubuntu 16.10 Base, Beta 2 Released
    Budgie-Remix, the unofficial Ubuntu spin making use of the Budgie Desktop, has released its 16.10 Beta 2 milestone following this week's Yakkety Yak Beta 2 release. Budgie-Remix is re-based to the latest Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety package changes. In addition, a number of the Budgie-0Remix packages have been working their way into Debian proper and thus are available to Ubuntu 16.10 users via the official channels. Now available this way is the budgie-desktop package, Moka icon theme, Faba icon theme, and the Arc theme. The Ubuntu repository has also pulled in the Budgie artwork and wallpaper packages too.
  • Yakkety Yak Final Beta Released
  • Canonical Launches Commercial Support for Kubernetes
    Canonical, the lead commercial vendor behind the open-source Ubuntu Linux operating system, is getting into the Kubernetes market. Canonical now offers a freely available implementation of Kubernetes as well as commercial-support options. "I have no doubt that Kubernetes will be one of the major container co-ordination systems," Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu, told ServerWatch.
  • [How To] Build an Ubuntu Controlled Sous-Vide Cooker
    I’ll be honest with you from the off: I had zero idea what sous-vide cooking was before I started writing this post. Wikipedia dutifully informs me that’s Sous-Vide is a style of cooking that involves a vacuum, bags, and steam.
  • Mintbox Mini Pro Linux Mini PC Launches For $395
    This week a new version of the popular Mintbox Mini Linux PC has been launched for $395 in the form of the Mintbox Mini Pro which is now equipped with 120 GB of SSD mSATA together with 64-bit AMD A10-Micro6700T system-on-a-chip with Radeon R6 graphics and features 8GB of DDR3L. The latest Mintbox Mini Pro is shipped preloaded with the awesome Linux Mint 18 operating system and includes a microSD card slot a serial port, and a micro SIM card reader. The new Mintbox Mini Pro is the same size as the original and measures 4.3 x 3.3 x 0.9 inches in size and weighs in at around 255g. The Linux mini PC incorporates a fanless design and features an all-metal case made of aluminium and zinc.