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Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Amarok 2.4.1 "Resolution" released srlinuxx 09/05/2011 - 2:58am
Story NVIDIA Optimus Unofficially Comes To Linux srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 9:22pm
Story Interview with Alexander Zubov (Steel Storm: Burning Retribution) srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 9:20pm
Story Mark Shuttleworth Prefers GPL V3 srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 9:19pm
Story Virtualization With KVM On Ubuntu 11.04 falko 08/05/2011 - 7:55pm
Story The Tale of Red Hat's Name srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:54pm
Story Why Not Linux? srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:53pm
Story The Oddest Game To Be Powered By Unigine srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:50pm
Story SimplyMEPIS 11 Final Released srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:48pm
Story My Week with Ubuntu Natty Narwhal srlinuxx 08/05/2011 - 5:47pm

klik bundle of Opera 9.1

Filed under
Software

This evening I've created a new klik recipe, for Opera 9.1. It makes the klik client fetch from Opera's download site their current weekly snapshot of the upcoming 9.1 release and transform it into a typical "1 application == 1 file == 1 click to download+run" klik bundle.

Why Linux will always be better

Filed under
Linux

Yep that's right. Linux will always be better. Even the latest offering of windows vista still doesn't cut it against linux and the other *nix type operating systems. It (vista) is still a reaction and an attempt at catchup to the linux operating system. It is only due to corporate inertia and end user ignorance that it hasn't been relegated to the back benches that linux is sitting on now. This situation will not last long though.

Working with Software Packages in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

All the packages that SUSE supplies are offered in RPM format. RPM now stands for the RPM Package Manager. Its original name was the Red Hat Package Manager, and it was developed originally by Red Hat, but it has been widely adopted by other distributions.

Music provider bets big on virtualisation

Filed under
Software

These days, lots of companies are stretching their hardware and energy dollars by consolidating print, file, DNS, and web servers on virtualisation platforms such as VMware. But not many companies boast of running their entire production infrastructure on virtual machines. An exception is Arvato Mobile.

Time's Person of the Year: You

Filed under
Misc

The "Great Man" theory of history is usually attributed to the Scottish philosopher Thomas Carlyle, who wrote that "the history of the world is but the biography of great men." He believed that it is the few, the powerful and the famous who shape our collective destiny as a species. That theory took a serious beating this year.

Keyboard Shortcuts for Bash

Filed under
HowTos

The default shell on most Linux operating systems is called Bash. There are a couple of important hotkeys that you should get familiar with if you plan to spend a lot of time at the command line.

OpenSuse completely supports my Notebook!

Filed under
SUSE

Good news for Dell Inspiron Users: Your notebook is completely supported in OpenSuse 10.2. In OpenSuse 10.2, I didnt have to do any special configuration at all to get my hardware running.

Mainstream Linux

Filed under
Linux

I talk quite a bit about Linux going "mainstream" in this blog. The mainstream thought on Mainstream Adoption is that anything "mainstream" is something that is familiar to the masses.

Monsieur Duval is definitely misunderstood

Filed under
Linux

When I posted on what Gaël Duval told Graham Morrison about Ulteo Connected Desktop, he promptly reacted by saying that Ulteo Connected Desktop is «only a part of the Ulteo system.» So we have to sit and wait before judging. Now that Ulteo Sirius Alpha1 was released...

Ulteo Sirius Alpha1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

In the spring of 2006 Mandriva decided that one of it's founders needed to find a new career, in turn Gael Duval was put out of work. Not to be held down, Gael decided to create a new Linux distribution with his own vision. The results of that goal is Ulteo, of which the first Alpha was released on December 6th.

VOIP on the Nokia 770 Internet Tablet

Filed under
Sci/Tech

I ended my previous article (Linux on the Nokia 770 Internet Tablet) by saying that the release of the OS 2006 prepared the way for some serious VOIP work. The 770 can now make SIP-based VOIP phone calls and is more like what you'd expect from Nokia--a phone!

Common Administrative Tasks in Linux

Filed under
HowTos

The tasks in this article are common ones that you may need to do when settingup your system and beginning your new life as the system administrator of your own Linux system.

openSuSE 10.2

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

The latest release of the SuSE Linux distribution was quietly made public about a week ago. Many feared for the distribution’s future with members of the Open Source community disgruntled by the Novell-Microsoft deal. Despite these fears, a friend of mine and I eagerly awaited the University of Stellenbosch’s mirror to get the DVD iso and downloaded it a day or two ago.

'The End Game': Red Hat's Stock Goes To NYSE In Another Round Of 'Us Vs. Them'

Filed under
Linux

Most of Raleigh’s 400 Red Hat employees gathered for the celebration on Tuesday, clapping as they watched a live video feed displaying their boss Matthew Szulik ringing the bell to open trading on the New York Stock Exchange. Red Hat’s move to the NYSE is part of its response to growing threats from giant Oracle and the recently announced Microsoft-Novell alliance.

TuxGames Game Machines

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Gaming

TuxGames.com announced the availability of their own Linux gaming rigs: the TuxGames Games Machine's. Preloaded with all available Linux Game Publishing(LGP) titles, Fedora Core 6, and your choice of hardware.

Linux.com holiday gift guide

Filed under
Misc

The holiday season is approaching rapidly, and if you're like us, you probably still have some holiday shopping left to do. In the spirit of crass consumerism, we've compiled a list of gifts you may want to add to your wishlist, or for the other geeks in your life.

Penguins helping items fly off shelves

Filed under
Misc

Penguins must be flying high. People are flocking to see them on the big screen, they star in ads all over the little screen and they're splashed across advertising circulars and packaging for a scad of products.

Redmond vs. Red Hat: Divide and conquer

Filed under
Microsoft

As we close out the year, it is instructive to ponder last month's pro-Linux announcement by Microsoft. It tells us a lot about how the company's thinking is evolving with respect to competition. And, more importantly, what that might mean to customers in the coming year.

Adding to the balance of the universe - Ubuntu Satanic Edition is released.

Filed under
Ubuntu

“Woe to you, Oh Earth and Sea,
for the Devil sends the beast with wrath
because he knows the time is short…

Let him who hath understanding reckon the distro of the beast,
for it is a Linux distro,
its distro is Ubuntu Satanic Edition.”

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