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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The time for revolution has come

Filed under
Linux

We are at a cusp in computing history. This time is now a delicate balancing point where the future of computing can go one way or another. It is also obvious that one party stands to lose a great deal while another stands to win a great deal. Ironically the party that stands to lose the most is the one who has brought this turning point into reality.

Eugenia: Ubuntu installed on the Inspiron 640m

Filed under
Ubuntu

Only a few hours after playing with Vista, I resized that partition (Vista now has a “shrink” utility) to 60 MBs and left 40 MBs free for Ubuntu (the rest 20 GBs are reserved by DELL as a recovery partition).

Installing The Aptana AJAX Development Environment On Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to install the Aptana IDE on an Ubuntu Edgy Eft system. The Aptana IDE is a free, open-source, cross-platform, JavaScript-focused development environment for building Ajax applications.

Introduction to OpenID

Filed under
Software

OpenID is an open decentralized digital identity system that has been gaining traction in recent months. It implements a solution to some everyday headaches such as single-sign-on, but it does not address related issues like privacy, trust, spam prevention, or message authentication. OpenID uses a multiple-stage sign-on process, but don't let that discourage you.

The Business Case for Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

For all the hype regarding Open Source Software (OSS), we sometimes forget logic in the excitement of trying to get on board with this latest trend. What we really care about (or should care about) is making a sound business decision regarding software. Think everyone is hopping on the OSS bandwagon because the software doesn't cost anything?

The Battle of Media Centers for Linux

Filed under
Software

If there is one thing that seems to be standard in the open source world, it would seem to be the abundance of overlapping projects that might be better suited to work together rather than completing software visions on their own. Today, we are going to look at the trend and even consider some examples.

How to Enable and Disable Ubuntu Root Password

Filed under
HowTos

Ubuntu is one of the few Linux distributions out there that will not enable the root account.If you want to do something with root permission on the console you have to type sudo before the command.

sudo" means superuser do. "sudo" will prompt for "Password:". Please specify user password

How GPLv3 addresses the EUCD and DMCA

Filed under
OSS

Draft 3 of GPLv3 should be out Real Soon Now, so I'd like to review some of the topics. I couldn't find a thorough explanation of how GPLv3 will deal with the "anti-circumvention" clauses of the DMCA and it's EU counterpart, the the EUCD (see Article 6), so here's my layperson understanding.

Novell loses another Samba team member

Filed under
SUSE

A reliable Novell source has sent me Samba team member Guenther Deschner's farewell email to Novell staff and a follow-up from Lars Mueller, another Samba core team member.

Of course Deschner left over Novell's agreement with Microsoft and the bad-faith actions that Novell has taken regarding its GPL-licensed software in connection with that agreement.

Installing Ubuntu - So easy, I may be about to join the darkside

Filed under
Ubuntu

The other day i thought I'd give linux a shot. so I went along to the ubuntu page (http://www.ubuntu.com) and clicked download. downloaded the iso for 6.10 that went pretty quickly - while I was doing other bits and pieces on the web, and it took a grand total of about 45 minutes.

The Road to KDE 4: Amarok 2 Development is Underway

Filed under
KDE

This week we'll take a brief look at some of the many features that are making their way into Amarok 2, which is the development branch for Amarok in KDE 4.The features discussed are all in progress features which have reached varying stages of completion. Read on for information about Amarok's engines (including Phonon), UI changes, changes to the Magnatune music store, OS X support, and more.

n/a

Review of Damn Small Linux 3.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Damn Small Linux (DSL) is based on KNOPPIX, so anyone who has used KNOPPIX or Debian in the past will feel right at home. The entire system is around 50MB so it will fit on small, business-card CD-R's and cheap USB memory sticks. DSL is a live CD, meaning it will run completely from a CD without having to install it to your hard drive.

No OSS Graphic Drivers - Who Has The Better Answer?

Filed under
Software

In April of last year CNET published an article entitled New Linux look fuels old debate (this is also an article where I was consulted). Andrew Fear, who is NVIDIA's software product manager, had stated NVIDIA's public reasons why they do not open-source their Linux display drivers.

Andrew Fear (NVIDIA):

Dealing with Runaway Processes

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever been using your Linux distro and suddenly found a program won’t close? It’s frustrating when an application hangs. In Windows, one could right click on the taskbar and choose “Task Manager” and kill the hanging process (which doesn’t always work BTW). In Linux, you can also kill these hanging processes.

Installing ATI driver in Open SUSE 10.2

Filed under
HowTos

You might have read my previous post on my experience moving from Kubuntu to OpenSuSe. I had to google to find out how to install the ATI driver for my ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 card. I did the driver installation thrice. Here are the steps to install the driver in Open SuSe 10.2.

NVIDIA Releases Gelato 2.1 - Film Quality Rendering Software

Filed under
Software

NVIDIA has released NVIDIA® Gelato® 2.1 high- quality, GPU-accelerated rendering software, which now includes support for Joe Alter's Shave and a Haircut software for computer-generated hair and fur effects.

Yankee Group rebuts Linux-Watch column

Filed under
Microsoft

The Yankee Group send us a rebuttal to a recent column by Steven J. Vaughan Nichols entitled, "Weather alert: new Microsoft FUD storm expected." Research fellow Laura Didio's response appears below, in an effort to allow our readers to hear both sides of the story and form their own judgments.

Hello, Steven:

Texstar on Safari

Filed under
Just talk

Here are some snapshots of PCLinuxOS' Texstar on vacation in New York City last weekend. He says he's having fun and is glad we ain't there! Big Grin

Actually, he said,

The Ubuntu Experience, Part 1

Filed under
Ubuntu

PC World recently did a feature article on Operating Systems, and named Ubuntu as their favorite Linux distribution. I decided to document my experience working with Ubuntu, and this first article, Part 1, will detail my experience installing and updating Ubuntu. I'm using the latest version of Ubuntu, 6.1.

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more