Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:28pm
Story Leftovers: Ubuntu Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:27pm
Story LibreOffice 4.3.6 "Still" Is Out with 110 Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:26pm
Story Mozilla Firefox 36 Will Bring Support for HTTP/2 Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:19pm
Story Xfce 4.12 Should Be Released in One Week, at the End of February Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:15pm
Story Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 Released – Detailed Review and Installation Instructions Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:11pm
Story Creating Forms for Easy LibreOffice Database Entry on Linux Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 6:03pm
Story INTERVIEW: TIM O’REILLY Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 5:56pm
Story Using play/pause buttons in Chrome with GNOME 3 Rianne Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 5:48pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 5:19pm

atop: an ASCII full-screen performance monitor

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: Every system administrator must be familiar with the top(1) command that shows the most active running processes in a Linux environment. atop is different than that.

Open Source Alternatives

Filed under
Software

mr-oss.com: Open source is rarely taken seriously. It has became a buzzword just like going green. What can open source actually do for your organization? What alternatives are available to replace our proprietary systems?

Linux is not good for you…

Filed under
Linux

fred.dao2.com: A friend of mine was telling me how she went to buy a new computer, asked to have Linux on it, and was told “Linux is not good for you at home” and that she shouldn’t worry, they’ll just install her Windows XP.

some howtos & stuff

Filed under
News
  • Unix and Linux SysAdmin Humor - Keep It To Yourself

  • Getting Rid of AWN and Replacing it with Gnome Do's "Docky"
  • Linux Void Episode 18 - Mania
  • Ubuntu 8.10 on a Dell Latitude D420
  • Ease Linux Networking With /etc/hosts
  • howto convert mpg to 3gp in ubuntu
  • OpenSuse 11.1: Broadcom bcm43xx Wireless Card
  • How to change the running process priority
  • How-To: Multiple monitors with ATI graphics
  • Wake-on-LAN setup (linux)
  • rsync and emelfm2
  • Photos From The Golden Age Of Computing
  • HOW-TO open an exe file in Linux Mint?
  • Linux: Fun with Big Files
  • Linux Html Editors; What Works, What Doesn’t

ZYpp project now on git

Filed under
SUSE

duncan.mac-vicar.com: You may have noticed (or not?) that svn.opensuse.org/svn/zypp is now read-only. Since a couple of weeks the ZYpp project repository is now hosted on git.opensuse.org.

What’s New In Windows 7?

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

workswithu.com: Many of the new features planned for the next release of Windows, however, seem more like catch-up than innovation. In particular, here’s a list of features new to Windows that have been around in the Linux world for more than a little while

The Advantages / Disadvantages of Leaving the Mainstream

Filed under
Linux
OSS

linuxloop.com: A recent Free Software Magazine article points out that using Linux protects you from potential governmental spying or hacking in two ways. All of this logic basically also applies to ordinary hackers, too.

Open Souce Multi Track Audio Editing Software Jokosher

Filed under
Software

geek2live.blogspot: Jokosher is an Open Source Multi Track Audio Editing Software. Could be used in creating Audio record, Podcasts.

Pagico v3.2 is coming to Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

pagico.com/blog: The last version of Pagico on Ubuntu was v2.3, released a long while ago. As Ubuntu not being our prioritized platform, we didn’t put too much energy on it. However, things have changed.

Enough is Enough. Higher Education...? Wake Up

Filed under
Linux
OSS

linuxlock.blogspot: It has been gratifying to see the number of businesses and personal computers moving to Open Source software and the Linux Operating System. However...

Top Sites That Every BitTorrent User Should Know About

Filed under
Web

makeuseof.com: The last few years have seen a tremendous growth in the number of BitTorrent users and the content that is available via BitTorrent. The number of sites indexing and searching BitTorrent files have kept pace with this growth.

Evolution gets a D-Bus API for mail metadata

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Philip Van Hoof, the developer behind the lightweight Tinymail e-mail framework, has written a plugin for GNOME's Evolution e-mail client that exposes the application's functionality through D-Bus.

Some Linux Apps I Discovered Recently

Filed under
Software

winterdom.com/weblog: I’ve been spending a lot more time on Linux as it’s been very helpful for my work: I put all kinds of test servers and tools there that I use during my java/.NET work. Because of this, I’ve been looking to improve my list of useful Linux applications, and I’ve found a few that I’ve liked well enough.

DesktopLinux Reader Survey!

Filed under
Linux
OSS

desktoplinux.com: Please participate in DesktopLinux.com's annual desktop Linux market survey! By answering a few quick questions, you will help us build a composite profile of our readership.

A look at Mozilla Snowl

Filed under
Moz/FF

aronzak.wordpress: Mozilla Snowl is a new experimental Firefox addon that acts as a more advanced feed reader. It can display RSS feeds and also Twitter messages.

Kernel Log: What's new in 2.6.29 - Part 3: Kernel controlled graphics modes

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: With the release of 2.6.29-rc1 last weekend, Linus Torvalds concluded the first phase, called the merge window, of the development cycle. This phase allows for incorporating the substantial changes intended for the next kernel version into the source code management system of the Linux kernel.

Why Open Source Will Succeed on the Desktop…Without Linux.

jaysonrowe.wordpress: I have been a consumer of Open Source software for a very long time. Here lately, I’ve been having a love/hate relationship with (not only) Ubuntu, but with Linux in general.

Review: OpenSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

headshotgamer.com: OpenSUSE (in various forms) has been around for quite some time and has been quite popular with developers and business users. It currently holds Distrowatch's number 2 spot on the page hit ranking and has a thriving community of users. OpenSUSE 11.1 is packing some good stuff.

Some things that I’d miss on moving from Linux to Windows

Filed under
Linux

technologytales.com: The latest buzz surrounding Windows 7 has caused one observer to suggest that it’s about to blast Linux from the desktop. My experiences might be positive but there are still things that I like about Linux that make me reluctant to consider switching back. Here are a few in no particular order:

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Alpha 3 Screenshot Tour

  • All That Matters for Now is Out-of-the-Box Experience
  • Ubuntu Rage
  • Google portable device runs Debian Linux
  • Mandriva Cooker (2009 Spring) boot times
  • Why Open Source is Eclipsing Everything Else
  • The Value of (Good) Documentation
  • Special Source 5: Interview with Jono Bacon
  • Open Solaris is Big...in Afghanistan
  • Spinning Unix and Linux Blog Content
  • Putting Linux Muscle in Your Pocket: Resources for USB Thumb Drives
  • Opportunities for open source M&A in 2009
  • (All this is) Gentoo for me
  • When Windows beats Linux: a cautionary tale
Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

More on Tesla's Compliance

10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more