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Friday, 20 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Ubuntu 12.04 the Macbook Pro Post Install fieldyweb 28/10/2012 - 5:59pm
Story The Perfect Desktop - Xubuntu 12.10 (Quantal Quetzal) falko 28/10/2012 - 10:26am
Story Apply To Be Part Of The Valve Linux Beta srlinuxx 27/10/2012 - 3:58pm
Story For a beginner-friendly distro, try Linux Lite 1.0.0 srlinuxx 27/10/2012 - 2:35am
Story What's New in GNOME 3.7.1 srlinuxx 26/10/2012 - 8:23pm
Story 20 Things I did After Installing Ubuntu 12.10 srlinuxx 26/10/2012 - 8:22pm
Story Windows 8: The desktop review srlinuxx 26/10/2012 - 8:19pm
Story some more leftovers: srlinuxx 26/10/2012 - 4:03pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 26/10/2012 - 5:48am
Story Gentoo Recruitment: How do we perform? srlinuxx 26/10/2012 - 5:41am

Ubuntu Live 2007 Day 1

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: Starting out the first-ever Ubuntu Live 2007 conference was Mark Shuttleworth's keynote followed by Stephen O'Grady and Jeff Waugh. Starting off the day was the announcements of Canonical Landscape for system monitoring and management and Ubuntu 8.04 being a Long Term Support (LTS) release.

Also: Mark Shuttleworth Stuck To Wall

'$100 laptop' production begins

Filed under
OLPC

BBC: Five years after the concept was first proposed, the so-called $100 laptop is poised to go into mass production. Hardware suppliers have been given the green light to ramp-up production.

Making splashy work with directfb in cooker

Filed under
MDV

blino: This week-end, it was splashy that was bothering me again. Since we are considering its inclusion in Mandriva Linux 2008.0, to replace the bootsplash kernel patch, I had to try it.

The Reverse Acronym Game: KDE*

Filed under
KDE

troy_at_kde: So folks, it has come to my attention through various conversations with people involved with open source, but not KDE, that we have an image problem. The problem is that KDE has outgrown its name. It used to be Kool, but now it's just K. It used to be Desktop, but it's outgrowing that metaphor. So all we have left is the Environment.

Linux: 2.6.23-rc1, Merge Window Closed

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: As expected, Linus Torvalds released the 2.6.23-rc1 kernel two weeks after the release of 2.6.22, ending the merge window, "and it has a *ton* of changes as usual for the merge window, way too much for me to be able to post even just the shortlog or diffstat on the mailing list".

Real Life with a Zonbu $99 Linux Mini-PC

Filed under
Hardware

mrzonbu: Ordering a Zonbu appears to be relatively straight-forward. Typical e-commerce stuff via their website. My total order came in below $350 (I think it was about $315 before shipping).

Shuttleworth: Ubuntu Is Enterprise-Friendly

Filed under
Ubuntu

wired blogs: The first Ubuntu Live conference just kicked off here in Portland, Oregon with a keynote from Canonical founder and Mark Shuttleworth. His talk centered around how the free operating system his company funds and supports is capable of bringing the same values it brings to the desktop -- ease of use, performance and compatibility -- to the server.

OpenSourceCMS - test drive content management systems

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: There are a fair few free software and open source content management system (CMS) projects out there, and finding the one that best suits your needs isn’t always an easy task. That is exactly the problem that OpenSourceCMS.com tries to solve.

FileZilla - A Short Review

Filed under
Software

shiftbackspace.com: Often I get questions regarding the software that I use on a daily basis. While I use Firefox, the GIMP, Amarok and VLC daily, I also use a fantastic FTP client, FileZilla, many times a day. Not only is FileZilla open-source (under the GPL), but it is also available on all major systems - Linux, Mac, and Windows.

Dual-Booting Windows XP/Vista And Ubuntu 7.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

In this tutorial I will teach you how to dual-boot between Windows XP/Vista and Ubuntu. This tutorial will be split up into two parts: Part one for people who have no operating system installed. Part two for people who have Windows XP/Vista installed and do not want to re-install Windows.

Pleasant Diversions At Studio Dave

Filed under
Software

linux journal: This week we'll look at two excellent applications that are coming into greater use here at Studio Dave, the LiVES video editor for Linux, and Reaper (yes, again), a native Windows audio/MIDI sequencer running under Wine.

Inkscape Tutorial - Trees

Filed under
HowTos

penguin pete: Fractals have a long history of fascinating computer and math geek alike, but this time we're going to take the way a fractal simulates natural ordered chaos and apply it to the practical purpose of drawing a natural object! However, this isn't going to be a very realistic tree, just a drawing good enough for an icon or a game sprite.

What Linspire Agreed To

Filed under
Linux

Groklaw: It's worse than Novell's, actually. It's worse than Tivo, in my book. With Linspire's agreement, you have to give up pretty much all your GPL freedoms, as far as I can make out, and more. And what do you get in return for giving up everything? True Type fonts, Windows Media 10, DVD playback, patent coverage...

Linux Kernel 2.6.23 Gains Two New Virtualization Solutions

Filed under
Linux

InfoWorld: The Linux 2.6.21 kernel then improved on the support for paravirtualization with the full featured addition of Virtual Machine Interface (VMI). Now, if that weren't enough, the upcoming 2.6.23 kernel release will feature two new virtualization frameworks.

A New Plasma Clock

Filed under
KDE

Riccardo Iaconelli: The new clock I made is more modern and fresh, and it’s digital. It’s made to look like the big informations that you can find in the train stations, the ones who flip down to change what is written on them.

E17 as a Desktop — don’t try this at home!

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: E17 is a still being developed version of a graphical environment called Enlightenment. E17 has been developed for a long time already. Stable release of the environment is not planned anytime soon, but this of course isn’t a problem for us to have a glance at what Enlightenment has to offer at the moment.

ingimp: improving the usability of the GIMP

Filed under
Software

DPotD: ingimp is an instrumented version of the GNU Image Manipulation Program that collects real-time usability data, such as the commands used, the size of images worked on, and so on. This usability data is automatically transmitted to ingimp for anyone to download and analyze.

Ubuntu Experiment

Filed under
Ubuntu

helpmerick.com: I decided that in order to really test out Ubuntu Linux (which I have been glowing about for the past few months), I will use the machine as my sole computer for the next two weeks. I'm going to leave my Windows machine cold turkey and rely soley on my laptop running Ubuntu. I will access files, as needed, on my Windows' machine, but only via my network through Ubuntu.

How package management changed everything

Filed under
Linux

Ian Murdock: What’s the single biggest advancement Linux has brought to the industry? Package management—or, more specifically, the ability to install and upgrade software over the network in a seamlessly integrated fashion.

Software manager in OpenSuse 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

liquidat: The software management for OpenSuse 10.3 is in heavy development. Compared to 10.2 zmd was dropped, leaving yast and zypper. Both work now basically.

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More in Tux Machines

What is Linux?

Leftovers: OSS

  • ISS Federal Lead Rob Rogers on Agencies’ Open Source Moves & ‘Information Advantage’ Efforts
    ExecutiveBiz recently caught up with ISS Federal Systems Vice President Rob Rogers for this interview to discuss ongoing data-related trends in government and where he sees agencies prioritizing efforts in that arena, plus his ideas for how the government should approach open source methodology. [...] We have seen a significant shift in the past five years around agencies adopting and embracing open source methods. For one, open source technology is the primary catalyst behind some of the most significant progress related to the evolution of “big data” and analytic capabilities, which is used pervasively in the intelligence community. Certain agencies have contributed major projects to the open source community, which further solidifies their position on supporting open source. One notable example is NSA’s contribution of NiFi and Accumulo to the Apache Software Foundation in 2014. If these types of actions are an indicator of the direction that the IC agencies are heading in their support of open source, then the future is bright.
  • Davos 2017: China unites 25 countries to establish Global Blockchain Business Council
    On January 17, the governmental and industrial representatives from China and 25 other countries gathered in Davos, Switzerland for the Davos Forum. According to the latest update provided by Tai Cloud Corporation to EconoTimes, Jamie Elizabeth Smith, the former spokesperson and special assistant of the U.S. president Obama, announced that the Global Blockchain Business Council (GBBC) is formally established. The first national team members include senior executives of World Bank Mariana Dahan, former Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves, former Prime Minister of Haidi Laurent Lamont, former Economy Minister of Ukraine Aivaras Abromavičius.
  • Intel's BigDL deep learning framework snubs GPUs for CPUs
    Last week Intel unveiled BigDL, a Spark-powered framework for distributed deep learning, available as an open source project. With most major IT vendors releasing machine learning frameworks, why not the CPU giant, too? What matters most about Intel's project may not be what it offers people building deep learning solutions on Spark clusters, but what it says about Intel’s ambitions to promote hardware that competes with GPUs for those applications.
  • Google's VR art app is open source and ready to get weird
    Google's Tilt Brush is capable of some pretty impressive results. But what if those 3D paintings and projects you made while strapped into virtual reality could escape into the real world?
  • How is your community promoting diversity?
    Open source software is a great enabler for technology innovation. Diversity unlocks innovation and drives market growth. Open source and diversity seem like the ultimate winning combination, yet ironically open source communities are among the least diverse tech communities. This is especially true when it comes to inherent diversity: traits such as gender, age, ethnicity, and sexual orientation.
  • Walmart’s Contributions to Open Source
    You might first think about open source in the context of outstanding tools for lean startup companies, but open source also finds a welcome home in behemoth, established companies, such as Walmart. In this O’Reilly OSCON video interview with Walmart Lab’s Alex Grigoryan, learn how Walmart both benefits from and contributes back to open source. The key takeaway? Open source allows you to reuse software components in labor saving ways.
  • Librecore: Aiming To Be A Better Libre Spin Of Coreboot
    Librecore is a new project aiming to be a new Coreboot downstream with a focus remaining on providing fully-free system firmware. Separately, Minifree/Libreboot has been accused (and admitted by Leah Rowe) to not paying a vendor for a completed contract. Librecore was formed due to "[Libreboot lead developer Leah Rowe] alienating large portions of the community, plus the stagnant and hard to use libreboot firmware and build system." With Librecore, they are aiming to use industry-standard tools and build environments. Another different design decision is pursuing Petitboot as the payload for a more modern and useful interface over GRUB as a payload.
  • Use of open source software growing across telecom
    Open source software may still be a new model for the telecommunications industry, but it’s rapidly gaining traction as operators look to mimic computing world. While the open source community has quickly gaining ground in the computing space, the traditional telecommunications industry has a history of hardening its siloed approach to networking technology. This was especially apparent at a time when most mobile telecom networks were 2G-based, with 3G technology just coming online in more advanced markets.
  • Open Source Software: What Every In-House Counsel Should Know
    Open source software (OSS) is ubiquitous in software development today, enabling technical innovation, productivity gains, and touching everything from big data and cloud to mobile and embedded. Control modules on the market today commonly include OSS components such as real-time operating systems, libraries, data interfaces, firmware, and display software.
  • 4 Common Open Source License Compliance Failures and How to Avoid Them
    Companies or organizations that don’t have a strong open source compliance program often suffer from errors and limitations in processes throughout the software development cycle that can lead to open source compliance failures. The previous article in this series covered common intellectual property failures. This time, we’ll discuss the four common open source license compliance failures and how to avoid them.

Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps

  • Introducing Docker 1.13
    Today we’re releasing Docker 1.13 with lots of new features, improvements and fixes to help Docker users with New Year’s resolutions to build more and better container apps. Docker 1.13 builds on and improves Docker swarm mode introduced in Docker 1.12 and has lots of other fixes. Read on for Docker 1.13 highlights.
  • Docker 1.13 Officially Released, Docker for AWS and Azure Ready for Production
    Docker announced today the general availability of Docker 1.13, the third major update of the open-source application container engine for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems. Docker 1.13 has been in development for the past couple of months, during which it received no less than seven RC (Release Candidate) versions that implemented numerous improvements for the new Swarm Mode introduced in Docker 1.12, a few security features, as well as a new Remote API (version 1.25) and Client.
  • Distributed Fabric: A New Architecture for Container-Based Applications
    There’s a palpable sense of excitement in the application development world around container technology. Containers bring a new level of agility and speed to app development, giving developers the ability to break large monolithic apps into small, manageable microservices that can talk to one another, be more easily tested and deployed, and operate more efficiently as a full application. However, containers also demand a new architecture for the application services managing these microservices and apps, particularly in regards to service discovery — locating and consuming the services of those microservices.
  • DevOps trends emerging for 2017 and beyond
    Finally, one of the biggest trends for 2017 will not be just a focus on engaging and implementing some of these DevOps best practices into your enterprise, but a sweeping adoption of the DevOps/agile culture. This is because one of the most important – if not the absolute most key –tenets to a successful DevOps organization is culture. The enterprises that most espouse the shared responsibility, the empowered autonomous teams, the can-do attitudes, and the continuous learning environment in which DevOps thrives will see the biggest benefits.

Kernel Space/Linux

  • Optimizing Linux for Slow Computers
    It’s interesting, to consider what constitutes a power user of an operating system. For most people in the wider world a power user is someone who knows their way around Windows and Microsoft Office a lot, and can help them get their print jobs to come out right. For those of us in our community, and in particular Linux users though it’s a more difficult thing to nail down. If you’re a LibreOffice power user like your Windows counterpart, you’ve only really scratched the surface. Even if you’ve made your Raspberry Pi do all sorts of tricks in Python from the command line, or spent a career shepherding websites onto virtual Linux machines loaded with Apache and MySQL, are you then a power user compared to the person who knows their way around the system at the lower level and has an understanding of the kernel? Probably not. It’s like climbing a mountain with false summits, there are so many layers to power usership. So while some of you readers will be au fait with your OS at its very lowest level, most of us will be somewhere intermediate. We’ll know our way around our OS in terms of the things we do with it, and while those things might be quite advanced we’ll rely on our distribution packager to take care of the vast majority of the hard work.
  • Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years
    In this presentation, kernel hacker Jan Lübbe will explain why apparently reasonable approaches to long-term maintenance fail and how to establish a sustainable workflow instead.
  • Linux 4.9 Is the Next Long-Term Supported Kernel Branch, Says Greg Kroah-Hartman
    Linux kernel maintainer Greg Kroah-Hartman confirmed today, January 19, 2017, in a short message, on his Google+ page, that the Linux 4.9 branch is now marked as "longterm," or as some of you know as LTS (Long-Term Support). The story behind Linux kernel 4.9 becoming the next long-term supported series dates from way before it's launch last month, on December 11, when Linus Torvalds officially announced the new branch. It all started back on August 12, 2016, when Greg Kroah-Hartman dropped a quick Google+ post to say "4.9 == next LTS kernel."
  • Maintainers Don't Scale
    First let’s look at how the kernel community works, and how a change gets merged into Linus Torvalds’ repository. Changes are submitted as patches to mailing list, then get some review and eventually get applied by a maintainer to that maintainer’s git tree. Each maintainer then sends pull request, often directly to Linus. With a few big subsystems (networking, graphics and ARM-SoC are the major ones) there’s a second or third level of sub-maintainers in. 80% of the patches get merged this way, only 20% are committed by a maintainer directly. Most maintainers are just that, a single person, and often responsible for a bunch of different areas in the kernel with corresponding different git branches and repositories. To my knowledge there are only three subsystems that have embraced group maintainership models of different kinds: TIP (x86 and core kernel), ARM-SoC and the graphics subsystem (DRM).