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About Tux Machines

Friday, 01 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Exotic Linux distros: A walk on the wild side srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 5:08pm
Story Tim Burke: ext4 Is Not Going Anywhere Any Time Soon srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 5:06pm
Story Webconverger: Linux for Libraries? srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 5:05pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 6:45am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 6:33am
Story Firefox 5.0 to Launch 16 Weeks after 4.0 srlinuxx 1 19/03/2011 - 5:30am
Story today @ phoronix srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 3:04am
Story Opera 11.10 beta improves Speed Dial, user interface srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 3:00am
Story Bulk Renamers srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 12:23am
Story Thunderbird and Ubuntu One: First Thoughts, First Roadblock srlinuxx 19/03/2011 - 12:21am

Matt Asay: Open source and The Big Chill

Filed under
OSS

What if Oracle's and Microsoft's recent actions are not about competing with the present, but rather about competing with the future? By this I mean that perhaps both are attempts to choke investment into open source. As in The Terminator movies, perhaps it's a way to kill the future before it happens.

Getting My Kicks On Route 64

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Some months ago I started collecting the pieces I needed to build my own 64-bit computer. After the construction phase I was faced with the distro question: Which audio-optimized Linux distribution should I try ? The logical first choice was 64Studio, a pure 64-bit Debian-based distribution with patched kernel and a nice suite of native 64-bit sound and music applications.

First Issue of Amarok Weekly Newsletter Released

Filed under
Software

In the first issue of the Amarok Weekly Newsletter, we talk about Magnatune.com music store integration and security, search inside lyrics, a new GStreamer-based engine, support for user-definable labels and promotional activities. Enjoy!

Winners and losers in the New Linux World

Filed under
Linux

Would you have believed at the end of last summer that Microsoft and Novell would partner over Linux, or that Oracle would create its own brand of Linux? What does it all mean? I'm ready to give you my two-cents on who are the winners and losers in this post-deal Linux world.

Tip of the Trade: Simplifying Snort

Filed under
Software

Snort has truly grown up. Its fans watched it grow from a fairly simple, lightweight, yet effective, intrusion detector into a full-blown intrusion detector and preventer. Snort now runs on Windows and Mac OS X as well as Linux and Unix.

Open Source Turncoats Must Not Be Supported: boycottnovell.com online

Filed under
Web
SUSE

The way to communicate with a corporation is economically. It is unacceptable behavior on Novell’s part to legitimize and participate in MS FUD campaign, and to violate the very license that allows them to distribute the community’s work in the first place. I say let the big MS lump payment be their severance from the community.

And with these words, www.boycottnovell.com is born.

Microsoft May Indemnify Some Red Hat Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

While Microsoft is hoping to enter into a patent deal with Red Hat similar to the one it has with Novell, the software giant has not ruled out going it alone and providing some sort of indemnification for its customers who use Red Hat Linux.

Get top-quality scans from your scanner with Lprof

Filed under
HowTos

The key to getting first-rate image output on any operating system is setting up a good workflow. One piece of the workflow puzzle that used to be out of reach for Linux users is device profiling -- accurately measuring hardware devices like scanners and monitors to account for their differing capabilities. But a relatively young open source application called Lprof does a professional job at that task.

Blizzard banned all Linux users from WoW yesterday

Filed under
Web

"This account has been found to have employed third party software designed to automate many aspects of the World of Warcraft game play experience. Such software runs contrary to the essence of World of Warcraft and provides an advantage over other players."

Monitor your Linux computer with machine-generated music

Filed under
Linux

Use Perl and FluidSynth to create a real-time musical composition of your system status. Learn how to integrate various system monitoring data into a harmony-producing, MIDI-controlled audio synthesis. Explore audible information methods and configurations to help you monitor and manage your computing environment.

Linux Tricks - Keeping your Ubuntu/Debian machines clean

Filed under
HowTos

I tend to install a lot of stuff on my Ubuntu machines. Much of this I do for curiosity and then report it here. This means that not only do I get to check out lots of interesting stuff, but my machines also start getting cluttered with stale files, old versions and orphaned files.

Here are two quick ways to help clean up your system.

Bash Tricks: Numbering Lines

Filed under
HowTos

Now and then you want to number the lines of a file. You can roll your own script to do that:

Complete Story.

Christopher Blizzard: first olpc machine in cambridge

Filed under
Hardware

We received our first machine in the Cambridge today from the plant in Taiwan. This is one of the hand-assembled models running the browser in Sugar. There are some more pictures in the wiki! Even one where I look pretty grumpy.

Pix Here.

Step-by-Step IPP based Print Server using CUPS

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial describes how to install a Linux print server with CUPS. It also covers the installation and configuration of printer drivers on the print server as well as the printer setup on a Windows 2000 client.

Review: Sony's PS3 versus Nintendo's Wii

Filed under
Hardware

Nintendo Co. Ltd. and Sony Corp.'s next-generation game consoles are finally ready for play, and bring significant advances to the gaming world. We tested the $599 PS3 that features a 60GB drive and 802.11b/g wireless networking plus Memory Stick, SD Card, and CompactFlash media slots. The Wii (pronounced "we") costs $250 and builds in Wi-Fi (but not ethernet).

ATI 8.31.5 Display Drivers

Filed under
Software

There have been speculations and rumors going around since AMD formally announced they would be acquiring ATI Technologies. Of the questions that had appeared were whether AMD would continue with the ATI brand name for its graphics processors and Chipsets. With today's new 8.31.5 fglrx release, the release notes are beginning referring to them as AMD Proprietary Display Drivers. Is this a sign of the elimination of the ATI brand as we know it?

Mark Shuttleworth: Pervasive presence

Filed under
OSS

This is one post in a series, describing challenges we need to overcome to make free software ubiquitous on the desktop.

Cedega 5.2 review

Filed under
Reviews

It's been said many times in many forums, blog posts, mailing lists, and comment sections: GNU/Linux won't really go far as a desktop operating system unless it can play the same games that Microsoft Windows can. For years, TransGaming has tried to make the dream of running Windows games in GNU/Linux into reality, and to a small extent it has succeeded with its Cedega, so this review will take a look at the state of Cedega circa version 5.2.7.

Who Else Gains from a GPL'd Java?

Filed under
OSS

Sun's announcement that it would be releasing Java under the GNU GPL confounded many of its critics (including myself) who had feared that the company was incapable of making such a bold move. Quite rightly, it has garnered praise from across the hacker world. But Sun's relationship with free software has not always been so idyllic.

EU gives Microsoft a deadline for antitrust compliance

Filed under
Microsoft

The European Union's top antitrust official, Neelie Kroes, gave Microsoft an ultimatum Wednesday, saying that it had eight more days to comply with an EU antitrust order or face daily fines of up to €3 million.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Google and GitHub are Opening a New Window on Open Source
    Where can you find millions of open source code repositories? That would be on GitHub, of course, and with all those code repositories, one would think that analyzing them would lead to some interesting conclusions about open source in general, correct? That's the thinking behind a new offering from GitHub in partnership with Google. The two have produced a new open dataset on Google BigQuery, a low cost analytics data warehouse service in the cloud, so that anyone can get data-driven insights based on more than 2.8 million open source GitHub repositories. The move brings new data analytics capabilities to BigQuery.
  • Open Source Gospel From Cisco’s Lauren Clooney
    Companies that traditionally focused on proprietary software are now playing catch up in order to compete by utilizing open source development.
  • My condolences, you’re now the maintainer of a popular open source project
    Marc Andreessen, creator of the Netscape web browser, famously said "software is eating the world." I’d like to posit that it’s actually open source software that’s eating the world, and I have a couple of data points to back me up. First, a conclusion from the 2015 Future of Open Source survey: “Seventy-eight percent of respondents said their companies run part or all of its operations on OSS and 66 percent said their company creates software for customers built on open source. This statistic has nearly doubled since 2010.”
  • Tip: Try these open-source investigative journalism tools
    The Investigative Reporters and Editors conference took place in mid-June in New Orleans, and one of the sessions at the event looked at open-source tools for investigations. This 'Steal my tool' session highlighted a number of useful open-source investigative platforms, which Sam Berkhead, engagement editor at IJNet, listed in this article published after the conference.
  • DuckDuckGo: The Little Search Engine That Gives Back Big
    The company’s website says, “DuckDuckGo is a general purpose search engine that is intended to be your starting place when searching the Internet. Use it to get way more instant answers, way less spam and real privacy, which we believe adds up to a much better overall search experience.” [...] Proprietor Gabriel Weinberg says his once-personal project (founded in 2008) isn’t making anyone wealthy, but he and his workers live decently, and he says they’re doing well enough that giving money to open source projects doesn’t hurt their budget.
  • Understanding open source licenses
    Open source licenses are licenses that comply with the Open Source Definition — in brief, they allow software to be freely used, modified, and shared. To be approved by the Open Source Initiative (also known as the OSI), a license must go through the Open Source Initiative’s license review process. There has been an increase release of open source software from the day of Linux. Today most popular frame works like bootstrap and software such as Atom IDE used by developers are open source. We often never worry about using open source code but do you know what the license under which the frame you’re using was released means?
  • Build your own open source solar panels
    Do-it-yourself electricity generation is still difficult and expensive. The inventors of the SunZilla project aim to make it easier, cleaner, portable, quiet, and completely open source. The SunZilla system is designed to replace diesel and gasoline-powered generators for portable and emergency power: camping, events, mobile phone charging station, provide power to refugee camps, or keep the lights on during a power outage. Two people can set it up in a few minutes. It is modular and plug-and-play. Leonie Gildein is one of the five SunZilla engineers, and kindly answered some questions about the project.
  • Lessons From The Downfall Of A $150M Crowdfunded Experiment In Decentralized Governance
    Hype around blockchain has risen to an all-time high. A technology once perceived to be the realm of crypto-anarchists and drug dealers has gained increasing popular recognition for its revolutionary potential, drawing billions in venture-capital investment by the world's leading financial institutions and technology companies. Regulators, rather than treating blockchain platforms (such as Bitcoin or Ethereum) and other "distributed ledgers" merely as tools of illicit dark markets, are beginning to look at frameworks to regulate and incorporate this important technology into traditional commerce.
  • Openfunds launches global standard for fund data interchange
    The standard is published on the openfunds website and can be used by anyone free of charge.

Hadoop and Spark

Openwashing

Leftovers: Software

  • Pitivi 0.96 — Cogito Ergo Proxy
  • Pitivi 0.96 Released With Proxy Editing Support
    In addition to proxy editing, Pitivi 0.96 also has timeline changes, transformation box, setting changes, user interface improvements, the start of allowing custom keyboard shortcuts, and support for Flatpak packages.
  • Calamares 2.3 Universal Linux OS Installer Released with Full-Disk Encryption
    Today, June 30, 2016, the Calamares team was proud to announce the final release and immediate availability for download of the Calamares 2.3 distribution-independent system installer. Calamares is currently being used in numerous popular operating systems, including, but not limited to, KaOS, Apricity OS, Chakra GNU/Linux, Netrunner, Sabayon, and OpenMandriva. It is the universal installer framework that many GNU/Linux distributions should adopt as it's now one of the most advanced system installers.
  • etcd3: A new etcd
    Over the past few months, CoreOS has been diligently finalizing the etcd3 API beta, testing the system and working with users to make etcd even better. Today etcd v3.0.0, the distributed key value store developed by CoreOS, is available. In practice, etcd3 is already integrated into a large-scale distributed system, Kubernetes, and we have implemented distributed coordination primitives including distributed locks, elections, and software transactional memory, to ensure the etcd3 API is flexible enough to support a variety of applications. Today we’re proud to announce that etcd3 is ready for general use.
  • Zend Framework 3 Released!
    After 17 months of effort, hundreds of releases, tens of thousands of commits by hundreds of contributors, and millions of installs, we're pleased to announce the immediate availability of Zend Framework 3.
  • ANNOUNCE: virt-viewer 4.0 release
  • Virt-Manager's Virrt-Viewer 4.0 Released