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Monday, 25 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Is Debian listening to its users?

Filed under
Linux

blog.stone-head.org: For some time ago I’ve been pondering about this question. As long as GSoC 2009 is about to start and people are looking for project ideas, I’m posting here a very preliminar draft of my findings and an idea for a posible software project.

Some personal thoughts about Ubuntu and Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

cutebuntu.moonthology.org: Not so surprisingly I’m ex-Windows-user who recently (little less than year ago) switched to Linux, Ubuntu more precisely.

Five Best Linux Distributions

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Linux

lifehacker.com: There are many, many Linux distributions, and a lot of unique reasons to like them. Read on to see which open-source operating systems inspired our readers to provide our biggest Hive Five response to date.

Popularity VS Usability

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: We see blog posts and articles everywhere. They proclaim that Distro X has the most users. Distro B has the most hits on a site that lists distros. Distro C is the top because Linus or some other "Geek God" prefers it.

Ubuntu: Understanding The Media Codec Problems

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

doctormo.wordpress: My problem is how he is lumping MP3 encoding and decoding into the closed-source pile and this is something that frustrates me terribly.

Qimo does it right

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I finally gave Qimo a turn a day or two ago. Nicely done, and that’s really all that can be said.

Essential Linux tools for the PC technician

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Linux

itwire.com: Recently, I blogged that every good IT technician really needs Linux in their toolkit – even if you're strictly a Windows shop. Here are more good reasons why a bootable Linux CD can really save your bacon including indispensable tools you must have.

PCLinuxOS 2009.1 - a worthy successor

Filed under
PCLOS

wamukota.blogspot: As one might expect from PCLinuxOS, the LiveCD allows an easy HD install and within a matter of minutes, you have PCLinux2009.1 running.

ext4, application expectations and power management

Filed under
Software

advogato.org/mjg59: There's been a certain amount of discussion about behavioural differences between ext3 and ext4[1], most notably due to ext4's increased window of opportunity for files to end up empty due to both a longer commit window and delayed allocation of blocks in order to obtain a more pleasing on-disk layout.

fwbuilder: Manage Firewalls Professionally

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: Everyone knows about netfilter/iptables. Unfortunately, managing a security policy with it remains a non-trivial task for several reasons. What is needed is a tool that lets an administrator define the security policy on a higher level of abstraction and hide the internal structure of the target firewall platform.

Why is Ubuntu the most popular distro?

Filed under
Ubuntu

manishtech.wordpress: I just came across a discussion on Reddit why Ubuntu is the most popular distro? Everyone who comes to know about Linux first hears about Ubuntu. Why is it so?

Using ATA Over Ethernet (AoE) On Debian Lenny (Initiator And Target)

Filed under
HowTos

some odds & ends:

Filed under
News
  • NVIDIA Pushes Out New Driver With No Change-Log

  • SLED 11 RC 4 first glance
  • Create ODF documents without OpenOffice.org
  • Microsoft's Silverlight Gaffe
  • Wormux 0.8.3 released
  • Reason why people who work with computers have so much free time
  • Saving date and time to hardware clock manually
  • Interesting New Features in Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty
  • Ubuntu Linux on Dell laptops
  • Install Chromium Browser on Arch Linux
  • We're Linux Video Contest Sad
  • Linux.com to Bring “Social Web” To Linux Geeks?
  • Vnc Configuration in Debian Etch/Lenny
  • Small tip - How to update / upgrade ArchLinux
  • FLOSS Weekly 60: BOINC
  • Converting avi files to dpg in Linux
  • Chromium on Ubuntu ! [HOW TO]

The Ill-Fated PCLinuxOS 2009.1 Experiment

Filed under
PCLOS

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: PCLinuxOS 2009.1 was running beautifully. The installation from the live CD had retained the settings and I had completed all my usual post-install multimedia checks. So why, by all that's holy, did I think that switching on Compiz's 3D effects might be A Good Thing To Try?

Celebrating Linux's 15th birthday

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Linux

anarchangel.blogspot: The wife and I are celebrating the anniversary of Linux, by watching "RevolutionOS", streaming from Netflix to our TiVo.

Take the Linux Filesystem Tour

Filed under
Linux

tuxradar.com: Well, hello! Welcome to the Linux Filesystem Tour. My name is Manuel Page, and I will be your guide today. I and my bus driver, Hal D., are very pleased to have you on board.

PCLinuxOS: Radically simple and a bit boring for geeks

Filed under
PCLOS

osgeex.blogspot: Today I gave the new PCLinuxOS 2009.1 a spin and planned to write a review. The "Problem" with PCLinuxOS is: it actually is radically simple.

I love openSUSE

Filed under
SUSE

gogoboygo.com/blog: I’m a convert from Ubuntu, after several years with that distribution of Linux, and the difference between Ubuntu 8.10 and OpenSuse 11.1 is night and day.

Debian: Absence of a General Purpose installable CD or DVD Media

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Debian is the best, most stable, and the biggest community distro! No doubt about it. I liked its latest, Lenny very much. But all the way from downloading it and installing was not a joyride.

HackMy...phase II

For those of you who don't know, Hackmy... forums started out as a "advanced" forum for users of PCLinuxOS.

HackMy has moved to a new host and has a whole new look and goal though. Hackmy is now open to users of Linux, ANY distro.

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More in Tux Machines

Review: BunsenLabs Helium

I have got a bit of soft spot for Openbox. I like how minimalist it is and how it hardly uses any system resources - according to my Conky panel BunsenLabs was using just over 200MB of RAM when idle. BunsenLabs provides a system that is usable out of the box but which can be tweaked any way you want. For this review I made the system cleaner and leaner but I could have gone in the opposite direction and create a desktop with conkies, panels and docks all over the place. DistroWatch's slogan, "put the fun back into computing", very much applies to BunsenLabs. In short, this is a distro I could easily use as my daily driver. My only concern would be the project's long term future. BunsenLabs Helium was released almost a year after Debian Stretch was released and then there is the worrying fact that Openbox doesn't work under Wayland, which is getting ever closer to replacing Xorg. BunsenLabs has got a sound community though, so I very much hope this distro will be around for many years to come. Read more

KaOS 2018.06

Just days after Plasma 5.13.1 was announced can you already see it on this new release. Highlights of Plasma 5.13 include optimising startup and minimising memory usage, yielding faster time-to-desktop, better runtime performance, and less memory consumption. System Settings with KDE’s Kirigami framework gives the pages a slick new look. KWin gained much-improved effects for blur and desktop switching. Wayland work continued, with the return of window rules, the use of high priority EGL Contexts, and initial support for screencasts and desktop sharing. And a tech preview of GTK global menu integration. Read more

8 reasons to use the Xfce Linux desktop environment

The Xfce desktop is thin and fast with an overall elegance that makes it easy to figure out how to do things. Its lightweight construction conserves both memory and CPU cycles. This makes it ideal for older hosts with few resources to spare for a desktop. However, Xfce is flexible and powerful enough to satisfy my needs as a power user. I've learned that changing to a new Linux desktop can take some work to configure it as I want—with all of my favorite application launchers on the panel, my preferred wallpaper, and much more. I have changed to new desktops or updates of old ones many times over the years. It takes some time and a bit of patience. I think of it like when I've moved cubicles or offices at work. Someone carries my stuff from the old office to the new one, and I connect my computer, unpack the boxes, and place their contents in appropriate locations in my new office. Moving into the Xfce desktop was the easiest move I have ever made. Read more

Programming: Go, Bugs and LLVM

  • 3 ways to copy files in Go
    This article will show you how to copy a file in the Go programming language. Although there are more than three ways to copy a file in Go, this article will present the three most common ways: using the io.Copy() function call from the Go library; reading the input file all at once and writing it to another file; and copying the file in small chunks using a buffer.
  • The life cycle of a software bug
    During the process of testing, bugs are reported to the development team. Quality assurance testers describe the bug in as much detail as possible, reporting on their system state, the processes they were undertaking, and how the bug manifested itself. Despite this, some bugs are never confirmed; they may be reported in testing but can never be reproduced in a controlled environment. In such cases they may not be resolved but are instead closed. It can be difficult to confirm a computer bug due to the wide array of platforms in use and the many different types of user behavior. Some bugs only occur intermittently or under very specific situations, and others may occur seemingly at random. Many people use and interact with open source software, and many bugs and issues may be non-repeatable or may not be adequately described. Still, because every user and developer also plays the role of quality assurance tester, at least in part, there is a good chance that bugs will be revealed.
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