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Saturday, 03 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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TurboLinux Wizpy launching worldwide from June

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: The TurboLinux Wizpy, a multimedia media player that contains a PC-bootable version of the Linux operating system, will go on sale worldwide in June.

Also: Taiwan PC makers considering Linux-based PCs

Quick Tips on Sections in OpenOffice Writer

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: Sections are great. They're a way to partition off part of the content of a text document and treat it differently.

Mandriva opens Linux development center in Russia

Filed under
MDV

Cnews: Mandriva, the official producer of Linux distribution has opened an office in St. Petersburg. One of the main tasks of the company’s representation is to help its Russian users avoid claims on behalf of the governing bodies which not always know the peculiarities of Linux OS licensing.

Max Spevack on Fedora 7, community building

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: Fedora 7 is hitting the streets, and I was fortunate to catch up last week with Max Spevack, Fedora Project Leader, to discuss new features in this release, and Fedora's contribution to the Linux community and to Red Hat. Fedora tends to get lost in the discussion about Red Hat, but Max made it clear that Fedora is very much an integral, vibrant part of Red Hat's value.

Also:

  • Fedora 7 puts the Linux community in control

  • Howto: Sun Java on Fedora 7
  • Max Spevack: Remixing Fedora 7
  • Announcing the Fedora Award winners for 2007
  • Fedora 7 release party at the Open Source Technolgy Center @ Novell
  • Fedora 7 released

Open Source and the DMCA: What Hath Digg Wrought?

Filed under
Legal

technewsworld: When Digg.com tried to follow orders from the MPAA and take down an HD DVD crack code a user had posted on the site, users rebelled so much that Digg simply gave in and allowed the code to remain. Some called it a victory for open source. Lawyers don't see it as an open source issue; however, they question whether issuing high-profile demands to keep the code secret was an effective tactic.

Keyboard-driven environments open a new window on the desktop

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you use a traditional desktop like GNOME or KDE, a keyboard-controlled desktop with a minimum of utilities may seem like stepping back 10 or 15 years in the history of interface design. Why bother, when traditional desktops are easy to use and RAM and disk space are so cheap nowadays?

What I Learned From Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Time4Tea: Mark Shuttleworth and a few Ubuntu developers stopped by the Sun Menlo Park campus on Friday May 4th. I'm not working with Ubuntu, but since I'm involved with the Solaris Companion and with general OpenSolaris issues, I wanted to see what they had to say about third-party packages and about how they do their releases.

Apache: Creating A Session-Aware Loadbalancer Using mod_proxy_balancer (Debian Etch)

Filed under
HowTos

mod_proxy_balancer is an Apache module that lets you create a loadbalancer. This loadbalancer retrieves requested pages from two or more backend webservers and delivers them to the user's computer. An important feature of mod_proxy_balancer is that it keeps track of sessions so that a single user always deals with the same backend webserver.

PCLinuxOS 2007

Filed under
PCLOS

linux n00b: I recently stuck PCLinuxOS 2007 on a 3rd partition on my system, mainly as a test for my fubar’ed video card. First impression: I really like it.

Linux Hostility

Filed under
Linux

talk bmc: From subtle to overt (I read a blog recently where the tag was (paraphrasing) “I'll teach my kid MS Windows and Excel, you teach yours Linux, we'll see who gets job first...), the stories are rife, but I do not understand why. But this recent case at IT/360 - LinuxWorld really cheesed me off.

Fedora 7 Prime "Moonshine" Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Phoronix: Out with the Core and in with the Moonshine. Fedora 7 (named Moonshine) is shipping today and marks the merge of Fedora Core and Fedora Extras along with bringing KVM virtualization into the limelight, a new installable LiveCD, a new build system, new wireless firmware, and other desktop improvements.

I’m Going In. (Freedom, Yeah!)

Filed under
Linux

Moving to Freedom: One of my problems in moving to free software has been a stubborn resistance to letting go of my old Windows ways and jumping in to the deeper end of the freedom pool. I’ve been getting over my self-directed FUD campaign and am enjoying the learning process these days.

Various Howtos & Tutorials

Filed under
HowTos
  • Open source software

  • mySQL command line tips
  • The process that can't be killed.
  • commenting your source code with combo keys in vim

Linux Users Ask for More

Filed under
Linux

eWeek: Enterprise IT users are looking for the major Linux vendors to update their enterprise products less frequently and to give them much more guidance about what is included in the patches and upgrades.

Novell unpunished over Microsoft deal-source

Filed under
SUSE

Reuters: Software maker Novell Inc. will not be punished by a software foundation that owns rights to much of the code behind the open-source Linux operating system, said a person familiar with the matter.

Also: Glory fades on Novell's Microsoft deal
And: Novell says Microsoft deal is good for Linux business

Upgrading Linux

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

SysAdminMag.com: Most Linux distributions have upgrade paths with their installation. They are, however, usually only useful for a sub-release upgrade, such as from 7.1 to 7.2 or 7.3. However, I have yet to run into one that will successfully and cleanly upgrade from one release to the next full release. However, with some thought and a decent understanding of *Nix, it's possible to upgrade or migrate without too much pain.

Mark Shuttleworth Talks Dell, Hardware, Ubuntu 7.10 & More

Filed under
Interviews

Phoronix: Earlier today we had spoke with Mark Shuttleworth to discuss the latest happenings in the Ubuntu world including Dell shipping Ubuntu PCs, getting open-source drivers from hardware vendors, and what is coming down the road for Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon.

Why Novell Must Not Crash and Burn

Filed under
SUSE

Linux Journal: Some people are rubbing their hands in glee at the thought of Novell crashing and burning completely, but such a development could actually turn out to be one of the worst things to happen to free software.

Open-source software makes the invisible man

Filed under
Sci/Tech

PC Pro: A University of Liverpool mathematician claims 30-year-old open-source software has cracked the equation that will allow scientists to make objects - such as humans, tanks or even entire islands - invisible.

Patents, MSPL, and the Apache 2.0 License

Filed under
OSS

linux devcenter: I’ve had software patents on my mind for several years. After listening to my colleage Allison Randal work on the Artistic License 2.0 for several years, I’ve finally noticed that other updated OSI-compatible licenses deal with software patents in two ways.

Also: Discussing Patents: Two Approaches

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • How fast is KVM? Host vs virtual machine performance!
  • Kernel maintenance, Brillo style
    Brillo, he said, is a software stack for the Internet of things based on the Android system. These deployments bring a number of challenges, starting with the need to support a different sort of hardware than Android normally runs on; target devices may have no display or input devices, but might well have "fun buses" to drive interesting peripherals. The mix of vendors interested in this area is different; handset vendors are present, but many more traditional embedded vendors can also be found there. Brillo is still in an early state of development.
  • Reviewing Project Management Service `Wrike` And Seems Interesting
    I have been testing some services for our project and found this amazing service, thought why not share it with you guys, it might be useful for you. Project management is a term that in some respects appears common, yet in practice still seems to be limited to large companies. While this may be true, the foundations of project management are actually rather simple and can be adopted by anyone, in any industry. One of the major requirements you need to consider when selecting a good project management software is the ability to run and operate it on the go via your mobile devices. Other factors include the ability to access the software from any platform whether it be Linux, Mac, or Windows. This can be achieved when the project management software is web-based. Wrike is a software that does of all this.
  • World Wine News Issue 403
  • OSVR on Steam, Unity drops legacy OpenGL, and more gaming news
  • GNOME Core Apps Hackfest 2016
    This November from Friday 25 to Sunday 27 was held in Berlin the GNOME Core Apps Hackfest. My focus during this hackfest was to start implementing a widget for the series view of the Videos application, following a mockup by Allan Day.
  • Worth Watching: What Will Happen to Red Hat Inc Next? The Stock Just Declined A Lot
  • Vetr Inc. Lowers Red Hat Inc. (RHT) to Buy
  • Redshift functionality on Fedora 25 (GNOME + Wayland). Yes, it's possible!
    For those who can't live without screen colour shifting technology such as Redshift or f.lux, myself being one of them, using Wayland did pose the challenge of having these existing tools not working with the Xorg replacement. Thankfully, all is not lost and it is possible even right now. Thanks to a copr repo, it's particularly easy on Fedora 25. One of the changes that comes with Wayland is there is currently no way for third-party apps to modify screen gamma curves. Therefore, no redshift apps, such as Redshift itself (which I recently covered here) will work while running under Wayland.
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016
  • Google's ambitious smartwatch vision is failing to materialise
    In February this year, Google's smartwatch boss painted me a rosy picture of the future of wearable technology. The wrist is, David Singleton said, "the ideal place for the power of Google to help people with their lives."
  • Giving Thanks (along with a Shipping Update)
    Mycroft will soon be available as a pre-built Raspberry Pi 3 image for any hobbyist to use. The new backend we have been quietly building is emerging from beta, making the configuration and management of you devices simple. We are forming partnerships to get Mycroft onto laptops, desktops and other devices in the world. Mycroft will soon be speaking to you throughout your day.
  • App: Ixigo Indian Rail Train PNR Status for Tizen Smart Phones
    Going on a train journey in India? Ixigo will check the PNR status, the train arrival and departure & how many of the particular tickets are left that you can purchase. You can also do a PNR status check to make sure that your seat is booked and confirmed.

Networking and Servers

  • How We Knew It Was Time to Leave the Cloud
    In my last infrastructure update, I documented our challenges with storage as GitLab scales. We built a CephFS cluster to tackle both the capacity and performance issues of NFS and decided to replace PostgreSQL standard Vacuum with the pg_repack extension. Now, we're feeling the pain of running a high performance distributed filesystem on the cloud.
  • Hype Driven Development
  • SysAdmins Arena in a nutshell
    Sysadmins can use the product to improve their skills or prepare for an interview by practicing some day to day job scenarios. There is an invitation list opened for the first testers of the product.

Desktop GNU/Linux

  • PINEBOOK Latest News: Affordable Linux Laptop at Only $89 Made by Raspberry Pi Rival, PINE
    PINE, the rival company of Raspberry Pi and maker of the $20 Pine A64, has just announced its two below $100-priced Linux laptops, known as PINEBOOK. The affordable Linux laptop is powered by Quad-Core ARM Cortex A53 64-bit processor and comes with an 11.6" or 14" monitor.
  • Some thoughts about options for light Unix laptops
    I have an odd confession: sometimes I feel (irrationally) embarrassed that despite being a computer person, I don't have a laptop. Everyone else seems to have one, yet here I am, clearly behind the times, clinging to a desktop-only setup. At times like this I naturally wind up considering the issue of what laptop I might get if I was going to get one, and after my recent exposure to a Chromebook I've been thinking about this once again. I'll never be someone who uses a laptop by itself as my only computer, so I'm not interested in a giant laptop with a giant display; giant displays are one of the things that the desktop is for. Based on my experiences so far I think that a roughly 13" laptop is at the sweet spot of a display that's big enough without things being too big, and I would like something that's nicely portable.
  • What is HiDPI and Why Does it Matter?

Google and Mozilla

  • Google Rolls Out Continuous Fuzzing Service For Open Source Software
    Google has launched a new project for continuously testing open source software for security vulnerabilities. The company's new OSS-Fuzz service is available in beta starting this week, but at least initially it will only be available for open source projects that have a very large user base or are critical to global IT infrastructure.
  • Mozilla is doing well financially (2015)
    Mozilla announced a major change in November 2014 in regards to the company's main revenue stream. The organization had a contract with Google in 2014 and before that had Google pay Mozilla money for being the default search engine in the Firefox web browser. This deal was Mozilla's main source of revenue, about 329 million US Dollars in 2014. The change saw Mozilla broker deals with search providers instead for certain regions of the world.