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Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Nvidia's Ginormous Gift to Linux Gamers srlinuxx 15/11/2012 - 6:40pm
Story Red Hat feuds with Rising Tide Systems srlinuxx 15/11/2012 - 6:37pm
Story Buyers Surprised By Coolness of Linux Powered Refrigerator srlinuxx 15/11/2012 - 12:50am
Story openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 1 KDE 4.9.2 srlinuxx 15/11/2012 - 12:48am
Story Mozilla's Big Comeback srlinuxx 14/11/2012 - 6:37pm
Story Gnumeric Crunches Numbers Like a Pro srlinuxx 14/11/2012 - 6:33pm
Story Review: 6 slick open source routers srlinuxx 14/11/2012 - 6:32pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 14/11/2012 - 6:28pm
Story openSUSE 12.3 Milestone 1 GNOME 3.6 srlinuxx 14/11/2012 - 4:05am
Story FOSS: A Linux Conversion srlinuxx 14/11/2012 - 3:43am

GCC summit proceedings available

LWN: The proceedings from the 2007 GCC Summit (PDF) are now available. It's interesting reading for anybody who is curious about where the GCC and GDB developers are going.

One Laptop Per Child Becomes Reality

Filed under
OLPC

ABCnews: It began as a dream more than 40 years ago, and today Nicholas Negroponte's vision of providing affordable laptops to children all over the world is moving closer to reality.

Tux Goes to Elementary School

Filed under
Linux

Wired blogs: It's common knowledge that getting kids excited about computers and technology is the best way to get them excited about learning. Kiddix Computing has come up with a Linux-based operating system designed especially for children aged 5-10.

Is Google on Crack?

Filed under
Google

I, Cringley: What has me all worked up is Google's announcement this week that it intends to bid at least $4.6 billion in the Federal Communication Commission's auction of bandwidth in the 700-MHz band being reclaimed in 2009 from analog television.

So You Want to Be a Linux Developer, Part 2

Filed under
Linux

Linux Insider: The continuing rise in popularity of Linux applications has become a boon to job opportunities for software programmers. However, the working culture of the open source industry is different from that of proprietary software developers.

Customize your laptop keyboard with X and KDE

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: I am a Linux user, and I recently got an eMachines laptop. Since I'm Uruguayan, my mother tongue is Spanish, and that presented a problem: laptops usually have an American-style keyboard. Here's how you can get international characters on your American keyboard and we'll see how you can enable the special "media" or "Internet" keys.

Decibel: first real world usage with kcall, but what is kopete?

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: Decibel was developed to provide a central interface for real time communication in KDE 4. The idea is that on the one hand users will be able to manage everything in one place while on the other hand developers can use the APIs provided by Decibel to integrate their program fully with this central place.

Linux tip: Job scheduling with cron and at

Filed under
HowTos

webdotdev.com: You need to run a job at midnight when system usage is low, or you need to run jobs daily or weekly, but you would rather be sleeping, or enjoying life in some other way. Other good reasons for scheduling jobs include letting routine tasks happen automatically, or ensuring tasks are handled the same way every time. This tip helps you use the cron and at capabilities to schedule jobs periodically or at a single future time.

FSF's Chart of Doom

Filed under
OSS

Beranger: Tom Callaway had to rant, knowing it's a rant, but he needed to get it off his chest. FSF's own licenses are so trickily compatible-and-less-than-compatible which each other, that the compatibility Chart of Doom is just horrendous:

Researchers Reveal Another Firefox Flaw

Filed under
Moz/FF

PCWorld: Mozilla Corp. has produced a patch for yet another critical flaw in Firefox, the latest embarrassment in a lengthening list this month for the open-source browser.

How To Harden PHP5 With Suhosin On Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to harden PHP5 with Suhosin on a Fedora 7 server. From the Suhosin project page: "Suhosin is an advanced protection system for PHP installations that was designed to protect servers and users from known and unknown flaws in PHP applications and the PHP core.

Sourceforge Community Choice Award winners are....

Filed under
OSS

Sourceforge has been running a community-driven awards process over the last month, trying to discover the top open source projects. Today, the winners were announced. The ones selected say a lot about those who frequent Sourceforge. But before I get into that, here are the winners:

Interview: The OpenBSD Foundation's Ken Westerback

Filed under
Interviews

jem report: Yesterday the OpenBSD Foundation announced its inception as a legal entity in charge of donations of money and equipment for the OpenBSD operating system and its associated projects. Today we have an interview with Ken Westerback, one of the foundation's founding members.

Using Epiphany with WebKit

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: GNOME's Epiphany web browser recently gained support for rendering HTML with WebKit. The patch for WebKit support in Epiphany—which was experimentally implemented at the GNOME GUADEC conference—is now available for testing.

Also: Second Life client to use GStreamer for video on Linux

Ubuntu creator claims more Linux-based Dells to emerge

Filed under
Ubuntu

engadget: It's not like this one was too difficult to see coming, but it sounds like Dell just may have a few more machines ready to take the Linux dip in the not-too-distant future.

Also: Dell to expand Linux PC offerings, partner says

Advertising the open source way with OpenAds

Filed under
Software

Matt Asay: OpenAds is one of the most interesting open source projects/companies on the planet. Period. I caught up today with Scott Switzer, OpenAds' founder and CTO, to learn more about the company and what it does.

Rockin' on without Microsoft

Filed under
Interviews

C|Net: Sterling Ball, a jovial, plain-talking businessman, is CEO of Ernie Ball, the world's leading maker of premium guitar strings. Ball's IT crew settled on a potpourri of open-source software--Red Hat's version of Linux, the OpenOffice office suite, Mozilla's Web browser.

Linux companies that didn't deserve to die

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch: A recent story entitled, "Dearly Departed: Companies and Products That Didn't Deserve to Die" didn't cover Linux or open-source companies. That got me to thinking. So here, without further adieu, is my list of five Linux companies that died before their time.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux 4.10-rc5

Things seem to be calming down a bit, and everything looks nominal. There's only been about 250 changes (not counting merges) in the last week, and the diffstat touches less than 300 files (with drivers and architecture updates being the bulk, but there's tooling, networking and filesystems in there too). Read more Also: Linus Torvalds Announces Fifth Linux 4.10 Kernel RC, Everything Looks Nominal Linux 4.10-rc5 Released, Now Codenamed "Anniversary Edition"

Fedora 26 Linux to Enable TRIM for Better Performance of Encrypted SSD Disks

According to the Fedora 26 release schedule, the upcoming operating system is approaching an important milestone, namely the proposal submission deadline for system-wide changes, which is currently set for January 31. Read more Also: Fedora 26 Planning To Enable TRIM/Discard On Encrypted Disks

New CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Linux Kernel Security Updates Pushed Into Beta

CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is informing users of the CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 enterprise-ready operating systems to upgrade their kernel packages immediately if they are using the Beta channel. Read more

KDE Neon Installer

  • KDE Neon Has Stylish New Install Wizard
    KDE Neon has adopted distro-agnostic Linux installer ‘Calamares’ its unstable developer edition. Calamares replaces the Canonical-developed Ubiquity installer as the default graphical installer used when installing the Ubuntu-based OS on a new machine. The stylish install wizard is already in use on a number of other KDE-based Linux distributions, including Chakra Linux and Netrunner.
  • KDE neon Inaugurated with Calamares Installer
    You voted for change and today we’re bringing change. Today we give back the installer to the people. Today Calamares 3 was released. It’s been a long standing wish of KDE neon to switch to the Calamares installer. Calamares is a distro independent installer used by various projects such as Netrunner and Tanglu. It’s written in Qt and KDE Frameworks and has modules in C++ or Python.