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Wednesday, 20 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Pinguy OS Makes Gnome Desktop as Good as It Gets Rianne Schestowitz 14/06/2014 - 6:58am
Story The People Who Support Linux: Engineer Thanks Father for His Linux Career Roy Schestowitz 14/06/2014 - 6:50am
Story A NEW DEFAULT THEME FOR GTK+ Rianne Schestowitz 14/06/2014 - 6:47am
Story Pinguy OS Gives Good GNOME, Is Unity Bad, and Lotsa Coming Games Rianne Schestowitz 14/06/2014 - 6:37am
Story xdg-shell: Wayland Rianne Schestowitz 14/06/2014 - 6:32am
Story Open Linux stack for Nvidia Jetson SBC taps new Linux 3.15 Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 10:35pm
Story Is Ubuntu's Unity Really All That Bad Nowadays? Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 10:28pm
Story REVAMPING GNOME’S DEFAULT AVATARS Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:48pm
Story Wine 1.7.20 Finally Released, Brings X11 Drag & Drop Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:30pm
Story Google Chrome 37 Dev Brings Multiple Fixes and a KDE-Only Feature Rianne Schestowitz 13/06/2014 - 7:22pm

Distro Rankings and Popularity Ratings through the Years

Filed under
Linux

junauza.com: Have you ever wondered which Linux distribution was most popular during the previous years? If you have, then you may be interested in some of the data that I’m going to present to you. We shall find out which distro had the most number of followers in the past. Here it goes:

Open source conference co-locates with Ubuntu show

Filed under
OSS

linuxdevices.com: Registration is open for the tenth annual edition of OSCON (Open Source Convention), as well as for a co-located Ubuntu Live conference. Scheduled for Jul. 21-25 in Portland, Ore., O'Reilly's OSCON 2008 is expected to draw some 2,500 open source experts, visionaries, and hackers.

Ulteo releases Linux desktop; bent on world dominatio

Filed under
Linux

downloadsquad.com: When we last left our favorite evil geniuses at Ulteo, they were diligently plugging away at making OpenOffice.org applications accessible through a browser. Now, they've taken their plans for global domination one step further with Ulteo Application System.

Damn Small 4.3: Damn Fast, too

Filed under
Linux

techiemoe.com: Damn Small Linux has traditionally been my favorite of the ultra-light distributions. Its contemporaries (Puppy, etc.) are very capable, but for some reason I've always had a special place for DSL.

Hands on With Wubi

Filed under
Ubuntu

foogazi.com: For what Wubi claims to be able to do, I’m somewhat surprised that I haven’t heard more about it. Basically, you can install Ubuntu from Windows and then boot to Linux or Windows without having to do any kind of Grub trickery or anything.

A quick look at the spring GNU/Linux distributions

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: It’s really the most wonderful time of the year. Out of the top 6 GNU/Linux distributions (according to DistroWatch.com), four are releasing or have released builds between April and June. What’s new in Mandriva, Ubuntu, Fedora, and openSUSE?

Why Open Source Software Developers are Good Marketers

Filed under
Software

As I looked introspectively into these stories I wondered how relevant they were. I came to a realization that while the one of the most commonly espoused virtues of open source is more eyeballs generating better code that perhaps one of the least mentioned strengths is their marketing ability.

Eleven Tips for New Xfce Users

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: Last year's DesktopLinux.com's survey showed Xfce was the third most popular desktop environment. If you want to investigate Xfce, what you want to watch for are the features that are either unique or else essential or hard to find, like the ones listed below. They may just tip your decision about which desktop to use.

The X300 Review, Part 2: Running Ubuntu Hardy

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

redmonk.com: Previously, on tecosystems: part 1 of our intrepid review of the X300, wherein we say nice things about Lenovo’s latest effort. Linux is my preferred desktop operating system. So, by popular request, the rundown on running Linux on the X300.

Fedora goes to a community-dominated board

Filed under
Linux

lwn.net: Fedora project leader Paul Frields has announced a change in the way the Fedora board is elected; as of the upcoming election, five of the nine seets will be elected by the community, while four will be appointed by Red Hat. So Red Hat will no longer select a majority of the board.

GNOME 2.24 Excitement Begins Tomorrow

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: GNOME 2.22.0 was only released last month, but being released tomorrow is the first development release in the path towards GNOME 2.24.0. This first development release will be dubbed GNOME 2.23.1, with GNOME 2.23 being the unstable branch.

Exciting arcade action in glorious ASCII

Filed under
Gaming

marcelgagne.com: Low tech games for a high tech world . . . Who says you need a fancy high-end graphics card to play some great Linux games? Heck, who says you need graphics at all?

Top OLPC Executive Resigns After Restructuring

Filed under
OLPC

pcworld.com: Drastic internal restructuring at the One Laptop Per Child Project has led to the resignation of one of the nonprofit's top executives from the effort. Walter Bender, the former president of software and content at OLPC, has left.

Also: Will OLPC Abandon Open Source?

The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva One 2008 Spring With KDE

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Mandriva One 2008 Spring (Mandriva 2008.1) desktop (with the KDE desktop environment) that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Imagine There’s No Penguins

  • Wired Asks the Wrong Question about Open Source
  • New Mandriva Linux is quite nice
  • Distributions and interactions
  • HPLIP troubles in Ubuntu 8.04
  • Tokamak Sprint Turns Plasma Upside-Down
  • Linux Desktop System Test "Stack"
  • A phony headline for a phony story
  • Drupal wins 2008 Webware 100 award
  • Linux Goes To War
  • Quick hex / decimal conversion using CLI
  • Useful Widgets for the Opera Browser
  • I Sense Serious Changes
  • Reinstalling Ubuntu Without an ISO Image

Kernel space: Bisection divides users and developers

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: The last couple of years have seen a renewed push within the kernel community to avoid regressions. When a patch is found to have broken something that used to work, a fix must be merged or the offending patch will be removed from the kernel. It's a straightforward and logical idea, but there's one little problem.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • 3x the fun…Triple Monitor Gaming!

  • Create a Logo from the Command Line
  • Wirelessly Sync an iPhone or iPod Touch with Ubuntu
  • Extracting columns and fields from a text file
  • Easy Customization of Firefox With Configuration Mania
  • Getting my wireless card working in Debian
  • Try IRC with Irssi to communicate via chat
  • Functions Vs. Subroutines In Perl And Bash - Palindromes Revisited

Defense wraps up closing argument in Hans Reiser trial

Filed under
Reiser

sfgate.com (AP): The defense attorney for a software programmer accused of killing his estranged wife told jurors Monday the prosecution hasn't proved the woman is dead, let alone murdered.

Media collection software in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: Around three years ago, when I began my adventure with ‘the penguin’, I had been looking for an application to catalog CDs. They were either ugly, or limited in functionality. This time, I didn’t think of giving up. In the repo I found mainly the old and abandoned (for nearly four years) GTKtalog, CdCat, Kat and Katalog and a program which made me stop for a moment - GWhere.

Hardy Heron reflects Ubuntu Linux ambitions

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Hardy Heron reflects Ubuntu Linux ambitions

  • Ubuntu Linux takes on enterprise server market with new OS
  • Ubuntu 7.10 - Final Review
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Linux-driven Sitara SiP module shrinks to 21mm square

Octavo’s OSD335x-SM is a 40 percent smaller version of its AM335x-based OSD335x SiP that adds a 4KB EEPROM. There’s also a compact, open-spec dev board. Last year, Octavo Systems added a new twist to BeagleBone development when it released its 27 x 27mm OSD335x System-In-Package (SiP) module. The OSD335x, which went on to form the basis of the BeagleBone Black Wireless and BeagleBone Blue SBCs, packs a Texas Instruments Sitara AM335x SoC and nearly all the functions of a BeagleBone Black SBC into a BGA module. Octavo has now followed up with a 40 percent smaller OSD335x-SM variant that measures 21 x 21mm (441 sq. mm). Read more

today's leftovers

  • Black screen of death after Win10 update? Microsoft blames HP
    Microsoft is pointing the finger of blame at HP's factory image for black screens of death appearing after a Windows Update. Scores of PC owners took to the HP forums last week to report that Windows 10 updates released September 12 were slowing down the login process. Users stated that once they downloaded the updates and entered their username and password, they only saw black screens for about five to 10 minutes. The forum members said that clean installs or disabling a service called "app readiness", which "gets apps ready for use the first time a user signs in to this PC and when adding new apps" seemed to fix the delay. Today, a Microsoft spokesperson told The Register: "We're working to resolve this as soon as possible" and referred affected customers to a new support post.
  • GNOME 3.26 Released! Check Out the New Features
    GNOME 3.26 is the latest version of GNOME 3 released six months after the last stable release GNOME 3.24. The release, code-named “Manchester”, is the 33rd stable release of the free, open-source desktop.
  • Arch Arch and away! What's with the Arch warriors?
    If you choose to begin your Linux adventures with Arch Linux after trying Ubuntu for a month, you're probably doing it wrong. If there's a solid reason why you think Arch is for you; awesome! Do it. You will learn new things. A lot of new things. But hey, what's the point in learning what arch-chroot does if you can't figure out what sudo is or what wpa_supplicant does?
  • Setting a primary monitor for launching games in a dual monitor rig
  • AMD Zen Temperature Monitoring On Linux Is Working With Hwmon-Next
    If you want CPU temperature monitoring to work under Linux for your Ryzen / Threadripper / EPYC processor(s), it's working on hwmon-next. The temperature monitoring support didn't make it for Linux 4.14 but being published earlier this month were finally patches for Zen temperature monitoring by extending the k10temp Linux driver.
  • Fanless Skylake computer offers four PCI and PCIe slots
    Adlink’s MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 embedded computers run Linux or Windows on Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offer 4x PCI/PCIe slots, 6x USB ports, and 4x COM ports. If Adlink’s new MVP-6010/6020 Series looks familiar, that’s because it’s a modified version of the recent MVP-5000 and last year’s MVP-6000 industrial PCs. The top half appears to be identical, with the same ports, layout, and Intel 6th Gen Core “Skylake” TE series processors. Like the MVP-6000, it adds a PCI and PCIe expansion unit on the bottom, but whereas the MVP-6000 had two slots, the MVP-6010 and MVP-6020 have four.
  • How Qi wireless charging works, and why it hasn’t taken over yet
    Qi has been an Android staple for a while, and now it’s coming to iPhones, too.
  • W3C DRM appeal fails, votes kept secret
    Earlier this summer, the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) — the organization responsible for defining the standards that make up the Web — decided to embrace DRM (aka "EME") as a web standard. I wasn’t happy about this. I don’t know many who were. Shortly after that, the W3C agreed to talk with me about the issue. During that discussion, I encouraged the W3C to increase their level of transparency going forward — and if there is an appeal of their DRM decision, to make that process completely open and visible to the public (including how individual members of the W3C vote on the issue). The appeal happened and has officially ended. I immediately reached out to the W3C to gather some details. What I found out was highly concerning. I’ll include the most interesting bits below, as un-edited as possible.

Red Hat News