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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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A new look at fonts in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu-assist.com: I’ve been playing around with fonts in Gutsy recently, so I thought I would document on this blog.

More Monitoring Software for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

itbusinessedge.com/blogs: Hyperic isn’t the only open source company hoping to capitalize on Ubuntu’s push for a bigger piece of the OS market, it seems. Thursday, GroundWork Open Source released GroundWork Monitor Open Source for Ubuntu and other Debian-based operating systems.

Entropy: 0.7.5 milestone

Filed under
Software

sabayonlinux.org: Last night I committed Entropy/Equo 0.7.5. Why is it a milestone? Because it is starting to bring something that no other package managers have: It’s possible to create a compressed package that self-contains the choosen application and all its dependencies. Just unpack it and double click on the executables.

Slowly Making Friends With The New Gimp

Filed under
Software

penguin pete: What's driving me to put Gimp 2.4 on my Slackware box (my main office) is that I can never again do a Gimp tutorial until I am set up with 2.4. The interface overhaul is just too massive; every Gimp tutorial currently published in print or the web has now become worthless.

A tale of four distributions

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe: With the final release of Fedora 8 last Thursday, I decided to perform a simple experiment with four distributions. I'd boot them on my two Gateway notebooks. The four distributions I tried were Fedora 8, Ubuntu 7.10, openSUSE 10.3, and Indiana (Open Solaris) Developer Preview.

Egosoft's X3: Reunion For Linux

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix: Last week we mentioned that X3: Reunion for Linux was going forward with beta testing, which is going on ten months after Linux Game Publishing originally announced they would be porting this X2 - The Threat sequel (the original announcement). Well, those fortunate to have closed-beta access privileges at Linux Game Publishing were finally greeted with the X3: Reunion Linux binary yesterday.

Also: Nouveau Companion 30

The day of the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

Robin 'Roblimo' Miller: I've been hearing the phrase "This is the year of the Linux desktop" for 10 years. For me, it's been a true statement for each of those years, because GNU/Linux has been my primary desktop operating system since 1997. But for most people around the world, this is the year of the the Windows desktop, same as it was last year and the year before. But if we each spent one day telling others about GNU/Linux, could we make a difference in the lives of at least a few people?

Can we afford not to give our kids Linux?

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: For any parent, myself included, setting your kids loose on the net is a daunting prospect. We have to do it because the net is a fact of life - it's in our schools, the workplace, public libraries and in many if not most homes of the developed world. Therefore, do we really have any option but to give them Linux?

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Why Ubuntu is my Fav
  • Ubuntu 1, Windows 0
  • Mepis Revisited
  • Full Circle Events Calendar
  • Installing Bengali fonts in Gentoo
  • Batch Rename Files and Folders with Métamorphose

Seduced by Sidux

Filed under
Linux

junauza.blogspot: Sidux is a desktop-oriented Linux distribution based on the “unstable” but most modern and up-to-date Debian branch called Sid (from the Toy Story character). The main aim of Sidux is to enhance and stabilize Sid, using its very own packages and scripts to allow a hassle-free use of Debian’s latest and cutting edge software.

Mandriva 2008 VS Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: For those of you that follow my blog, you must have noticed that I’m a Mandriva user. Recently though, I took an interest in Ubuntu: I installed version 7.04 on a laptop, and it did look interesting, enough to make me doubt my commitment to Mandriva’s products.

Feature plans for Fedora 9

Filed under
Linux

liquidat: Fedora 8 has just been released, but of course plans for the next version are already under way: a Fedora 9 Feature List has been created in the Wiki, just like the one for Fedora 8, and people and groups now add their plans and aims.

New Windows refurbisher program fights piracy, Linux

Filed under
Microsoft

computerworld: Observers said MAR also attempts to ameliorate another risk: that refurbishers, frustrated by the high cost and difficulty of following Microsoft's arcane Windows licenses to the letter, will simply install a free Linux operating system on renewed PCs instead.

Fedora/Linux for Noobs

Filed under
Linux

blog.coffeedaze.com: The truth of the matter is Linux is quickly becoming a viable option for the every day user. With a plethora of distributions and software available, plus some great eye candy, the Linux desktop will be seen in more common homes as the years go on.

Also: Fedora Core 8 on Lenovo 3000

Fedora 8 Review

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat ruled the Linux distribution world, before Ubuntu came and took over. With the current release for Fedora, it seems that Red Hat is fighting really hard to control the lost ground. The intense effort is clear from the current release. If we ignore minor hick-ups, werewolf is one of the best releases from Fedora. With this release Fedora is returning to my workstation as distribution of choice, after a long time.

Top-10 gift ideas for the Linux Gadget Geek

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices: Got a Linux Gadget Geek on your shopping list? You can't fail with a gift from this guide to the ten hottest Linux-powered devices gleaned from LinuxDevices.com's news throughout 2007. There's something for everyone, at prices from $150 to $1,000.

After Fedora 8 comes Fedora 9!

Filed under
Linux

fedora-announce-list: The development cycle of Fedora 9 will begin in earnest tomorrow. This will mark the first attempt at composing Rawhide with package builds that target Fedora 9. There is quite a number of them built up already, over 800. This will be a bumpy ride at first.

Fedora 8 Installation Guide

Filed under
HowTos

my-guides.net: Fedora 8 (Werewolf) has been released! Just like Fedora Core 6 and Fedora 7 I wrote this guide to help you with some common installation tasks that might be useful for you. Everything has been tested on my system and it works! Learn how to set up extra repositories, add video/dvd and audio codecs, install useful applications, configure Firefox's plugins, install compiz-fusion and much more!

Linux On Half Of All New Servers? Red Hat's Got Plans

Filed under
Linux

informationweek: Red Hat is partnering with Amazon to offer Linux-based computing power as an on-call computer resource, letting companies scale up applications without building a bigger data center. That Linux-on-demand idea has sizzle, but there are other interesting pieces in Red Hat's latest batch of products, including more virtualization support and one audacious goal.

The Little Vendor That Could - The Latest In the Mandriva vs Microsoft Saga

Filed under
MDV

MaximumPC: Earlier this week, we told you about how a 17,000-seat deal for Mandriva Linux in Nigerian classrooms had been scuttled by Microsoft at the last moment. Well, the saga continues: according to the IDG News Service, the deal is still on.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE and GNOME

  • A Simple, Straightforward Clipboard Manager for GNOME
    Clipboard Manager extension for Gnome Shell is a no-frills clipboard manager for GNOME. It adds an indicator menu to the top panel and caches your clipboard history. There’s nothing extra; no regex searching, or cross-device, multi-sync or pan-dimensional magic. Just a simple, easy to access clipboard history. I’ve never been a particularly big clipboard fan. I typically only need to access whatever I copy as I copy it.
  • First GNOME 3.26 Development Release Out, Some Apps Ported to Meson Build System
    GNOME Project's Michael Catanzaro just informed us via an email announcement that the first unstable release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is out now for public testing and early adopters. Yes, we're talking about GNOME 3.25.1, the first development in the release cycle of GNOME 3.26, which is currently scheduled to launch later this year, on September 13. Being the first unstable release and all that, GNOME 3.25.1 doesn't ship with many changes, and you can check out the CORE NEWS and APPS NEWS for details.
  • Features To Look Forward To In Next Month's KDE Plasma 5.10
    We are just one month away from seeing the next KDE Plasma 5 desktop release.
  • User Question: With Some Free Software Phone Projects Ending, What Does Plasma Mobile's Future Look Like?
    Rosy. While it is true that Plasma Mobile used to be built on the Ubuntu Phone codebase, that was superseded some time ago. The recent events at Ubuntu and other mobile communities have not modified the pace of the development (which is pretty fast) or the end goal, which is to build frameworks that will allow convergence for all kinds of front-ends and apps on all kinds of devices.

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
  • Google Assistant SDK preview brings voice agent to the Raspberry Pi
    Google has released a Python-based Google Assistant SDK that’s designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3. Google’s developer preview aims to bring Google Assistant voice agent applications to Linux developers. The Google Assistant SDK is initially designed for prototyping voice agent technology on the Raspberry Pi 3 using Python and Raspbian Linux, but it works with most Linux distributions. The SDK lets developers add voice control, natural language understanding, and Google AI services to a variety of devices.
  • Huawei, Google create a high-powered single board computer for Android
    The Raspberry Pi is very popular with DIY enthusiasts because of the seemingly endless possibilities of how you can design devices with it. Huawei and Google have created their own single board computer (SBC), but this will probably benefit Android developers more than DIY enthusiasts. The HiKey 960 is a very robust SBC aimed at creating an Android PC or a testing tool for Android apps.
  • Huawei’s $239 HiKey 960 wants to be a high-end alternative to Raspberry Pi
    12.5 million sales in five years – Linaro and Huawei have unveiled a high-end (read: expensive) rival.

Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
  • Experts weigh in on open source platforms, market
    In this Advisory Board, our experts discuss the pros and cons of open source virtualization and which platforms are giving proprietary vendors a run for their money.
  • Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite
    Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.
  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]