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Friday, 27 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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My Tribe - An enjoyable resource management game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

linuxhelp.blogspot: My Tribe is the latest game from Grubby Games - the creators of Prof Fizzwizzle and Fizzball. Grubby Games are known for releasing Linux versions of all their games. My Tribe game also has a Linux version. The first time I started playing the My Tribe game, I was taken in by its vivid graphics.

A Linux Christmas Carol explained

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: On Christmas Eve I suggested what "Jingle Bells" may look like if it were a Linux shell script. Here it is for those who missed out, and some interpretation for those who didn't.

Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop Customization Guide

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: Because many people complained a lot about the looks of the new Ubuntu OS and other major Linux distributions, and how they wanted a more eye-candy, professional desktop, we thought that the following tutorial would be a nice Christmas Gift for all of you Linux enthusiasts out there.

OpenSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

valdyas.org: I thought it'd be a tolerably good idea to celebrate boxing day with installing OpenSUSE 11.1. After all, given that this laptop is a Thinkpad X61t with built-in tablet, installing a new version of any distribution tends to be interesting.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Is Windows 7 Really A Linux Killer?

  • atool: handling archives without headaches
  • The NetSlave Quiz - Unix And Linux Humor
  • Contributing to a Project with a Maintainer Who Doesn't Merge Contributions Quickly
  • VLC Christmas Easter Egg
  • RedHat’s new oVirt virtualization host looks promising
  • cpio - copy files to and from archives
  • How to install NetBeans 6.5 on Ubuntu Linux desktop edition

DSL vs Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux

aronzak.wordpress: Today, in Ken Hess’s Linux Blog, the top 10 Distrowatch distros are listed as ones to try out by downloading and burning them to disc or virtualising. What annoys me is that Damn Small Linux (abbreviated DSL because it’s a bad name) got into that list, but not Puppy Linux. Why?

passing between years

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: The calendar in my Plasma panel says that soon we will have gone through all the days allocated for 2008 and will start in on 2009. While a rather arbitrary line in time, calendar year-ends are a convenient time to look both back and forward. KDE sits between two great years in its history and therefore there is much one can reflect upon as well as look forward to.

An exclusive interview with Martin Nordholts (of GIMP)

Filed under
Interviews

jcornuz.wordpress: For a long time I wanted to do an interview with one of the GIMP developers. Then I came across Martin Nordholts (aka enselic) website. I decided he was the man and bugged him for an interview.

Obligatory Year-End Positive Linux Predictions

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Almost every year end, most blogs - magazines - publications and so called “Linux gurus” makes mostly positive predictions about the future of Linux and it’s market share. Following this tradition, it’s only fair that I too share with you my Linux predictions for 2009.

The Definitive Guide to Open Source Hardware - 2008

Filed under
Hardware

googlelunarxprize.com: Again this year MAKE Magazine blog has publishes the annual Open Source Hardware Guide listing no less than 60 open source hardware projects, ranging from simple microcontroller boards to a fully functional cell phone. Open source hardware are projects where the designers have decided to publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files necessary to recreate the hardware.

The Internet is the tree, open source the fruit

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the big journalistic trends of 2008 was to call every new Internet paradigm open source. This was both a compliment and a warning.

Quick Thoughts on Amarok 2.0

Filed under
Software

jintoreedwine.wordpress: I was very pleased to hear that Amarok 2.0 had finally been released and I have been awaiting it for some time now. I had heard stories of people not liking the new interface, but I didn’t have much of an opinion on it because I hadn’t used it.

Win to Mac – Why not move to Linux?

Filed under
OS

mac.blorge.com: We are documenting the move of a business user from the Windows platform on a PC to the OS X platform on a Mac. Why would such a user move to the Mac and not to Linux?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu 4GB Ram Limitation and Solution

  • migrate ext3 > ext4
  • How to get your iRiver E100 working nicely in Linux
  • Ubuntu Desktop Effects : Composite not available
  • Instructing APT to not consider recommends packages as strict dependecies
  • The Debian Package Management System
  • Desktop Resources
  • How To Backup Gmail In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Menage Skype and Facebook with Pidgin
  • How to install VMware Tools - Tutorial
  • Banish your daemons for a faster Linux PC
  • Cropping Images using GIMP
  • Using .htaccess for password protecting web directory

Sid Or Sidux?

Filed under
Linux

tuxicity.wordpress: Sidux is based on the unstable branche of Debian, better known as Sid. I decided to give it a go and see if its a good idea to use Sidux in stead of Sid.

First look at Windows 7 beta 1

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: I have to thank Santa for leaving me a copy of Windows 7 beta 1 in my stocking for Christmas Day. This beta (build 6.1.7000.0.081212-1400) should be the first and only beta from Microsoft of Windows 7, and I’m pleased to report that it’s a good one.

The War for Open Source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.opennms.org: Starting about the time that Bill Gates wrote his infamous Letter to Hobbyists, the commercial software industry has sought to control and restrict access to source code.

P3 Xubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: I've been running Xubuntu 8.1 on a 700 Mhz P3 COMPAQ ENPRO computer with 512 MB of RAM. This system originally had Windows 2000 on it and it ran fairly well if a little slow. I've tried Debian 4.0 on it and wasn't really impressed. With an earlier version of Ubuntu it was a little more lively. Xubuntu and a P3 is a good combination, especially with the xfce desktop.

Fast and 'free' beats steady and paid on MySQL

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: MySQL, the lovable little database engine that could - for reasonable values of could - is starting to feel the pain of being an open source project distributed by a large company.

Is ndiswrapper Dead?

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: For a long time, ndiswrapper, which uses Windows wireless drivers to make wireless cards work on Linux, was a vitally important component of many Ubuntu systems. In many cases, it was the only way for users to access wireless Internet. Unfortunately, the ndiswrapper project’s pulse has seemed to go from faint to non-existent over the last several months.

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More in Tux Machines

Critical Live Boot Bug Fixed and Ubuntu 18.04 is Finally Released

A critical bug in live boot session delayed Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release for several hours. The bug has been fixed and the ISO are available to download. Read more

Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date. Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution. And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices. Read more

Openwashing Leftovers

Linux Foundation: New Members, Cloud Foundry, and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit

  • 41 Organizations Join The Linux Foundation to Support Open Source Communities With Infrastructure and Resources
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 28 Silver members and 13 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world's largest open collaboration communities.
  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Architecture
    Back in the olden days, provisioning and managing IT stacks was complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. Getting the resources to do your job could take weeks or months. Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) was the first major step in automating IT stacks, and introduced the self-service provisioning and configuration model. VMware and Amazon were among the largest early developers and service providers. Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) adds the layer to IaaS that provides application development and management. Cloud Foundry is for building Platform as a Service (PaaS) projects, which bundle servers, networks, storage, operating systems, middleware, databases, and development tools into scalable, centrally-managed hardware and software stacks. That is a lot of work to do manually, so it takes a lot of software to automate it.
  • Jonathan Corbet on Linux Kernel Contributions, Community, and Core Needs
    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report. The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.