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Friday, 26 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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LA hosts laid-back Southern California Linux Expo

Filed under
Linux

If you didn't get to attend the Southern Cal Linux Expo and would have liked to - here's a rundown of what happened - the good, bad, ugly and everything in between.

FSFE's Fiduciary License Agreement is no panacea

Filed under
News

This week FSF Europe (FSFE) announced the release of its Fiduciary License Agreement (FLA), a form of copyright assignment in which a free software project can place its collective copyright under the control of a single organization or trustee.

GPL 3 release could slip past March

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation is no longer committing to the planned March deadline for a new version of the General Public License, but a third draft of the seminal open-source license is due soon.

Autopackage struggling to gain acceptance

Filed under
Software

Fourteen months ago, the Autopackage project was small and active, and members sounded optimistic about its success. Now, although the alternative installer project continues, progress has almost come to a halt. The #autopackage channel on irc.oftc.net sits vacant most days, the developer blogs cover almost anything except the project, and commits to the source code repository have become rare. Formally, the project is still alive, but the major contributors all agree that it is faltering. So what happened?

Turning Firefox to an Ethical Hacking Platform.

Filed under
Moz/FF

The security testers community has a large panel of security tools, methodologies and much more to perform their pentests and audit assessments. But what happens if you find yourself weaponless. The magical solution could be Firefox and its extensions developed by ethical hackers and coders.

Microsoft, Novell expand on technical collaboration plans

Filed under
SUSE

Microsoft and Novell on Feb. 12 unveiled more specifics regarding their joint technical roadmap. As expected, the two companies are collaborating on four areas of technology that address significant problems faced by enterprises: virtualization, Web services for managing physical and virtual servers, directory and identity interoperability, and document format compatibility.

Using script to record terminal sessions

Filed under
HowTos

In this Linux tip, Vincent Danen explains the usefulness of script to log transcripts of network changes. There are also a couple of things to look out for if you use it.

links2 - a cross platform console based web browser which also renders images

Filed under
Software

Recently, while I was browsing a website in Firefox, I found that it took forever to load the concerned web page. Blame it on my internet connection or on the condition of the web server hosting the web page, I was literally fed up with the wait and closed the window with disgust. It was during this time that I wondered whether it will make my browsing experience a bit more pleasant if I switched to a console web browser such as lynx.

Ubuntu: Linux kernel vulnerabilities

Filed under
Security

Mark Dowd discovered that the netfilter iptables module did not correctly handle fragmented IPv6 packets. By sending specially crafted packets, a remote attacker could exploit this to bypass firewall rules.

Ten more Cape schools get Linux labs

Filed under
Ubuntu

Absa, Engen will spend R600 000 to provide ten Northern Cape schools with Linux-based school laboratories. The two corporates have joined with the province's Dinaledi team in an effort to improve maths and science results in the ten schools by deploying the Shuttleworth Foundation's tuXlab service.

Linux Wireless summit II

Filed under
Software

Earlier this month the Linux Wireless summit II, following the number one form 2006, took place in London. Main topics were the current state of the new WLAN stack fro Linux as well as the reasons for the still slow adoption of Linux by hardware vendors.

Linux and Vista users share driver pain

Filed under
Software

Customers are getting annoyed. They spent good money on the latest and greatest PC peripherals, only to find out that the hardware is only partially supported on their operating system of choice. Without the kernel drivers necessary to power them, some of the best features of the new toys are going unused.

Ubuntu Goes Low Spec!

Filed under
Ubuntu

As Ubuntu continues to make its presence known throughout the world, it was only a matter of time before the project spawned an offshoot variation or two that would enable people with lower-spec machines to participate in all that Ubuntu goodness.

CLI Magic: Zip your files across the network with Woof

Filed under
HowTos

Woof is a temporary Web server that is invoked when you want to transfer files. When a file is on offer, the recipient can download it using a browser or through wget, a popular command-line download utility.

HDTV for Linux: New Options

Filed under
Hardware

Once considered to be way too complicated for the newer Linux user, HDTV on a 'Nix box often times felt just out of reach for many. Then we found that hardware designed for Linux specifically was in the works. The card is known simply as the HD-5500.

Also: pcHDTV HD-5500 - HDTV for your Linux desktop

Firefox Site Gets a Relaunch

Filed under
Interviews

We recently sat down with Mozilla technology strategist Mike Shaver, who explained the reasoning behind the site's overhaul. He hopes the enhancements will not only help developers shepherd their add-ons from prototype to finished product, but also make it easier for new users to discover new extensions.

Developing nations to test new $150 laptops

Filed under
Hardware

From Brazil to Pakistan, some of the world's poorest children will peer across the digital divide this month -- reading electronic books, shooting digital video, creating music and chatting with classmates online.

Goodbye, PCs; Hello, Linux

Filed under
Linux

By using customized Linux pxe-bootable images and any pxe-bootable machine, including thin clients, and adding a multihead video card, you can make PCs and the fat operating system history.

Fixing software suspend / hibernate with uswsusp in Ubuntu Feisty (and Edgy)

Filed under
HowTos

After upgrading to Feisty, my new favorite feature suspend-to-disk (aka hibernate) was broken badly; basically, the resume would never be found, so it’d act as if it had a corrupted swap partition and unmounted disks.

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More in Tux Machines

Having offended everyone else in the world, Linus Torvalds calls own lawyers a 'nasty festering disease'

Coding curmudgeon Linus Torvalds has gone off on yet another rant: this time against his own lawyers and free software activist Bradley Kuhn. On a mailing list about an upcoming Linux conference, a discussion about whether to include a session on the GPL that protects the open source operating system quickly devolved in an angry rant as its founder piled in. Read more

The Battle of The Budgie Desktops – Budgie-Remix vs SolusOS!

Ladies and gentleman, it’s the moment you have all been waiting for… the main even of the evening! In this corner, wearing Budgie trunks, fighting out of Ireland, created by Ikey Doherty, the man behind Linux Mint Debian Edition — SolusOS! And in this corner, built on the defending champion, also wearing Budgie trunks, aiming to be the next flavor of Ubuntu, Budgie-Remix! Read more

Leftovers: Software

  • 5 Cool Unikernels Projects
    Unikernels are poised to become the next big thing in microservices after Docker containers. Here’s a look at some of the cool things you can do with unikernels. First, though, here’s a quick primer on what unikernels are, for the uninitiated. Unikernels are similar to containers in that they let you run an app inside a portable, software-defined environment. But they go a step further than containers by packaging all of the libraries required to run the app directly into the unikernel.
  • Cedrus Is Making Progress On Open-Source Allwinner Video Encode/Decode
    The developers within the Sunxi camp working on better Allwinner SoC support under Linux have been reverse-engineering Allwinner's "Cedar" video engine. Their project is being called Cedrus with a goal of "100% libre and open-source" video decode/encode for the relevant Cedar hardware. The developers have been making progress and yesterday they published their initial patches that add a V4L2 decoder driver for the VPU found on Allwinner's A13 SoC.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.6 Milestone 3 Released For Linux Benchmarking
  • Calibre 2.65.1 eBook Viewer Adds Driver for Kobo Aura One and Aura 2 Readers
    Kovid Goyal released today, August 26, 2016, a new maintenance update of his popular, cross-platform, and open-source Calibre e-book viewer, converter and library management tool. Calibre 2.65 was announced earlier, and it looks like it's both a feature and bugfix release that adds drivers for the Kobo Aura One and Kobo Aura Edition 2 ebook readers, along with a new option to the Kobo driver to allow users to ignore certain collections on their ebook reader. The list of new features continues with support for right-to-left text and tables to the DOCX Input feature, as well as the implementation of a new option to allow users to make searching case-sensitive. This option can be found and enabled in the "Searching" configuration section under Preferences.
  • Calamares 2.4 Universal Installer Framework Polishes Existing Functionality
    A new stable version of the Calamares universal installer framework used by various GNU/Linux distributions as default graphical installer has been released with various improvements and bug fixes. Calamares 2.4 is now the latest build, coming two months after the release of the previous version, Calamares 2.3, which introduced full-disk encryption support. However, Calamares 2.4 is not as big as the previous update as it only polished existing functionality and address various annoying issues reported by users.
  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.400.2.0
    Another Armadillo 7.* release -- now at 7.400. We skipped the 7.300.* serie release as it came too soon after our most recent CRAN release. Releasing RcppArmadillo 0.7.400.2.0 now keeps us at the (roughly monthly) cadence which works as a good compromise between getting updates out at Conrad's sometimes frantic pace, while keeping CRAN (and Debian) uploads to about once per month. So we may continue the pattern of helping Conrad with thorough regression tests by building against all (by now 253 (!!)) CRAN dependencies, but keeping release at the GitHub repo and only uploading to CRAN at most once a month.
  • Spotio Is A Light Skin for Spotify’s Desktop App — And Its Coming To Linux
    Spotify’s dark design is very much of its identity. No-matter the platform you use it on, the dark theme is there staring back at you. Until now. A bunch of ace websites, blogs and people I follow have spent the past 24 hours waxing lyrical over a new Spotify skin called Spotio.

Servers/Networks

  • Rackspace to be Acquired for $4.3B
    Rackspace announced that it is being acquired in an all-cash deal valued at $4.3B. Pending regulatory anti-trust approval, the firm will be taken private by a group of investors led by Apollo Global Management in Q4 of 2016. This valuation equates to a price of $32/share. The 38% premium cited in the announcement is calculated against a base share price from August 3, as the news about the pending acquisition began increasing the company stock price as early as August 4. For historical context, this valuation falls considerably below the company’s peak market capitalization in January 2013 when Rackspace was worth $10.9B. This means that the company’s current valuation – including the premium – is less than 40% of what it was at its highest point.
  • More on Open Source Tools for Data Science
    Open source tools are having a transformative impact on the world of data science. In a recent guest post here on OStatic, Databricks' Kavitha Mariappan (shown here), who is Vice President of Marketing, discussed some of the most powerful open source solutions for use in the data science arena. Databricks was founded by the creators of the popular open source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, which is itself transforming data science. Here are some other open source tools in this arena to know about. As Mariappan wrote: "Apache Spark, a project of the Apache Software Foundation, is an open source platform for distributed in-memory data processing. Spark supports complete data science pipelines with libraries that run on the Spark engine, including Spark SQL, Spark Streaming, Spark MLlib and GraphX. Spark SQL supports operations with structured data, such as queries, filters, joins, and selects. In Spark 2.0, released in July 2016, Spark SQL comprehensively supports the SQL 2003 standard, so users with experience working with SQL on relational databases can learn how to work with Spark quickly."
  • SDN, open source nexus to accelerate service creation
    What's new in the SDN blog world? One expert says SDN advancements will be accelerated, thanks to SDN and open source convergence, while another points out the influence SDN has in the cloud industry.
  • Platform9 & ZeroStack Make OpenStack a Little More VMware-Friendly
    Platform9 and ZeroStack are adding VMware high availability to their prefab cloud offerings, part of the ongoing effort to make OpenStack better accepted by enterprises. OpenStack is a platform, an archipelago of open source projects that help you run a cloud. But some assembly is required. Both Platform9 and ZeroStack are operating on the theory that OpenStack will better succeed if it’s turned into more of a shrink-wrapped product.
  • Putting Ops Back in DevOps
    What Agile means to your typical operations staff member is, “More junk coming faster that I will get blamed for when it breaks.” There always is tension between development and operations when something goes south. Developers are sure the code worked on their machine; therefore, if it does not work in some other environment, operations must have changed something that made it break. Operations sees the same code perform differently on the same machine with the same config, which means if something broke, the most recent change must have caused it … i.e. the code did it. The finger-pointing squabbles are epic (no pun intended). So how do we get Ops folks interested in DevOps without promising them only a quantum order of magnitude more problems—and delivered faster?
  • Cloud chronicles
    How open-source software and cloud computing have set up the IT industry for a once-in-a-generation battle