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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu Users Looking For Linux Chicks

Filed under
Ubuntu

Alexander Wolfe: It's always been my impression that, appearances to the contrary, Linux aficionados are no different than the rest of us. So I wasn't surprised when I saw a post on the Ubuntu Women forum, from a guy, who's wondering if there are "any good places online to meet like-minded free software women."

openSUSE 10.3: one step forward, two steps back

Filed under
SUSE

iTWire: These days when you download a Linux distribution and burn it to CD, you would expect that it would not take too much of an effort to have a look at it. Unless, of course, it's one of three distributions which are aimed at so-called geeks - Gentoo, Debian and Slackware.

Also: openSUSE 10.3 - Review

How to effectively address the free software community

Filed under
OSS

Rudd-O: Winds of change are sweeping through the software industry. Today, it’s no longer fashionable to decry free software types as it was just a few years ago — the cool kids are all “leveraging” and reaching out to free software communities. But not everyone’s doing it right, so let’s explore how to start a positive relationship with free software.

Fluxbox Stable 1.0 Released

Filed under
Fluxbox

Fluxbox.net: A new stable release! Finally after almost four and a half years with 0.9.x release we got to 1.0.0! This release includes a lot of bugfixes, new styles, updated language support, better shaped corners and much more.

sniffing a few distros, part 2

Filed under
Linux

beranger: While several people are rushing into openSUSE 10.3 ("too good to skip", said this guy), I have kept my desktop's openSUSE 10.2 mostly unused, as I have been using Fedora 7 on my laptop, and then I replaced it with several RHEL5 clones...

A Mandrivan's First Look at openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
MDV
SUSE

Frederik's Blog: I downloaded the OpenSUSE 10.3 DVD to test it out and compare it with Mandriva 2008.0. I was interested in reviewing the current state of this distribution and maybe also get some inspiration for improvements I can propose for Mandriva 2008.1.

A Death Threat From A Puppy Linux Supporter

Filed under
Linux

Caitlyn Martin: I’ve just been informed by e-mail that not only are some defenders of Puppy Linux flaming me on the new DistroWatch Weekly comments but one actually issued a death threat against me for being “negative” about his or her favorite distribution.

Hacking openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE
HowTos

softwareinreview.com: Novell's openSUSE 10.3 is an exciting desktop operating environment that includes or supports nearly every program you need for work and play. But there are those last few programs and issues that make openSUSE just short of perfect. Web browser plugins for some kinds of online content; Windows Media and DVD movie playback support; and drivers for Atheros wireless devices and Nvidia and ATI video cards are the chief things holding openSUSE back for some users. This guide will help you remove as many of those barriers as possible.

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux caught sleeping on the job

  • Basic Linux Tips & Tricks, part 2
  • Linux: Monitor hard disks temperature with hddtemp
  • Installing an Ubuntu monitoring system with Cacti, Zenoss and Smokeping
  • How to Run Web Applications Seamlessly on Ubuntu
  • How to Install Compiz in Debian
  • Show the List of Installed Packages on Ubuntu or Debian

Novell Delivers Open Enterprise Server 2

Filed under
SUSE

opensource.sys-con.com: Novell Open Enterprise Server 2 is now available to customers worldwide. Open Enterprise Server 2 features full 64-bit support of software services previously found only on NetWare, along with storage management enhancements and NetWare virtualization.

Also: Novell Sparkles in OpenSUSE Update

Supporting More Partitions!

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "15 partitions (at least for sd_mod devices) are too few," Jan Engelhardt suggested along with a patch to try and make the mounting of an unlimited number of partitions possible. H. Peter Anvin proposed as an alternative, "now when we have 20-bit minors, can't we simply recycle some of the higher bits for additional partitions, across the board?

Also: Load Balancing Cpusets

Some openSUSE 10.3 Misconceptions

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: There are some misconceptions floating around about openSUSE 10.3. Unfortunately uninformed people are still allowed to blog Eye-wink so let me pick up some I read:

Also: People of openSUSE: Christian Boltz

Educating the masses and squabbling at the distrotech

The user doesn’t care what the operating system is, they are not installing it to use an operating system, they are installing it for the things they can install and run on it… can they use their word, excel, PowerPoint docs… how? Can they play their CDs? How? Can they watch a DVD from their collection? How? If all those names, IBM, Novell etc, were shown in an ad, people would have a lot more confidence to try and see. That’s all Linux needs them to do, try one. Any one. They are all united under the march of the penguin.

Customize your Emacs world

Filed under
News

This tutorial walks you through some of the useful ways you can customize and configure the Emacs environment. Learn how to change everything about the Emacs environment to your liking, from the behavior of minor modes to the default key bindings.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 223

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Puppy Linux 3.00

  • News: openSUSE 10.3 released, Mandriva 2008 seeded, Ubuntu 7.10 available for pre-order, Judd Vinet resigns as Arch Linux project leader
  • Released last week: openSUSE 10.3, Zenwalk Linux 4.8
  • Upcoming releases: Mandriva Linux 2008, Frugalware Linux 0.7
  • New distributions: Alegna Linux, Elbuntu, KinuX Linux, Linius, Mythbuntu
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Dell Preps for Next Linux Desktop Release

Filed under
Ubuntu

TechIQ: A major desktop Linux upgrade is set to be released on October 18. Michael Dell is expected to personally use it. And the PC giant will pre-load it on selected desktops and notebooks. Buzz about this next Linux release — dubbed Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon — is growing across the web. But what exactly does Gutsy Gibbon (aka Ubuntu 7.10) offer to desktop customers and solutions providers? Here’s a look.

Also: Ubuntu 7.10 should make Dell happy

“Is a cursory look at the CentOS LIVE CD worth every penny?”

Filed under
Misc

Enterprise Linux Log: The review in question in this case is one for CentOS 5. Or, I should say, it is a review for the CentOS 5 LiveCD that proclaims to be a review for the enterprise release of CentOS. It’s an important distinction to make and, if you’re trying to catch a break as a Linux review site, you should probably know the difference before your fingers hit the keys to type out a headline.

"Novell is not forking OpenOffice"

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: From recent media reports, casual readers could easily believe that OpenOffice.org, the popular free office suite, is fragmenting. Slashdot reported last week that Novell is backing an official fork, while Ars Technica suggested that if what was happening fell short of a fork, then it was still "serious fragmentation" and "not a good thing for the OpenOffice.org community." However, a closer look at the situation shows that what is happening is less of a dramatic split than the airing of long-time grievances and the media's discovery of a long-established institution.

Thunderbird Process of Change Part 1

Filed under
Moz/FF

mitchell's blog: In the coming months there will be a lot of discussion about how mail and Thunderbird will evolve. There will also be more detailed discussions about the new organizational home as we move from plans to concreteness. This seems a good time to describe how we got to where we are today.

Open Source Gaming Review: Wormux 0.8

Filed under
Gaming

raiden's realm: For anyone who ever loved and played the famous Worms PC game series, then Wormux is the game for you. Even if you weren't much of a fan (like myself) of the original Works series, you'll find Wormux none the less captivating and enjoyable, and even addictive in some respects.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics