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Monday, 18 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Kernel 4.0 Delayed by a Week, Release Candidate 7 Now Available for Download Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 8:49am
Story Tiny wireless-rich COM runs Android on 2.7GHz Snapdragon Rianne Schestowitz 07/04/2015 - 8:44am
Story Linux Kernel 3.18.11 LTS Released With Bug Fixes And Improvements Install/Update In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 07/04/2015 - 6:51am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 11:32pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 11:30pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 11:26pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 11:26pm
Story XKCD's Comic About OSes Is Hilarious, Predicts Launch Date of GNU Hurd 1.0 Roy Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 10:08pm
Story 12 reasons to buy the best Android Wear smartwatch you’ve never heard of Rianne Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 9:50pm
Story Krita 3.0 Rianne Schestowitz 06/04/2015 - 9:37pm

Why I Love Linux and FOSS

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com/blog: FOSS is all about giving power and control to individuals. It embraces all of the important freedoms-- the freedom to create, share, invent, collaborate, learn, and change, all without penalties or artificial barriers.

Critical Mass

Filed under
Linux

danlynch.org: Dvorak has never had much love for Linux and he’s been very derogatory in the past. He seems to love the latest Ubuntu. The two words that really stuck out to me in the article though were “critical mass”.

After two years, a new PCLinuxOS ships

Filed under
PCLOS

desktoplinux.com: Two years after its last major release, the interesting PCLinuxOS project has quietly posted a major new release.

First encounters of the SimplyMepis kind

Filed under
Linux

ldjackson.net: It’s funny that my first encounter with SimplyMepis came as sort of an accident. I have been reading Preacherpen’s articles about Mepis and had actually downloaded the new SimplyMepis 8. Since I already had the CD of Mepis 8, I decided to see what it would do on the old laptop.

Google and the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: My compadre, David Coursey, doubts that Google will actually be partnering with any hardware vendor to deliver Google Android to users as a desktop Linux. Actually, David, I'm sticking with that prediction.

European open-source policy paper reflects Microsoft influence

Filed under
OSS

news.cnet.com: It's fascinating to see governments around the world embrace open source as a way to boost local economies and improve sovereignty. It's even better when the policy process itself is laid bare, allowing outsiders to see the partisan meddling that goes into a publicly articulated policy.

Possible data loss in Ext4

Filed under
Software

h-online.com: A bug report posted in the bug tracker for the next version of Ubuntu 9.04 (Jaunty Jackalope) describes a massive data loss problem when using Ext4, the future standard file system for Linux.

An Interview With The Developers Of FFmpeg

Filed under
Software
Interviews

phoronix.com: Earlier this week the FFmpeg project reached version 0.5, which was quite significant considering no new FFmpeg release was made available in years. This release contained a plethora of new encoders and decoders, support for VDPAU, a variety of bug-fixes, and many other improvements. What is next for FFmpeg?

Massive updates in slackware-current

Filed under
Slack

slackbook.org/blog: Today, Pat Volkerding published a massive amount of package updates to the slackware-current tree. Some of the absolute highlights mentioned in the ChangeLog are indication of a big step forward for Slackware, and most importantly: KDE 3.5.10 is gone, replaced by KDE 4.2.1.

Designing a Linux PAM login security application

Filed under
Linux

Learn 10 steps to designing a simple PAM security login app for Linux

Etymology of an Open Source App/Project

Filed under
Software

hehe2.net: The natural extension of the “Etymology of a Distro” blog would be delving deeper into Open Source project’s etymologies. Indeed many readers already suggested that. Here are 20 Open Source applications and the interesting (and not so interesting) stories behind their names:

Review: Zenwalk 6.0, A Sprint And A Stumble

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: THE first real connection I made at an emotional level with a Linux distribution was with Zenwalk, back in its version 2.0 days, and it was that connection which persuaded me to make my first (modest) cash donation to an Open Source project.

Desktop GUI - Quick Clarification

Filed under
Software

wolf911.us: I run across people that get confused as to what a GUI is. Of course a GUI stands for Graphical User Interface and can be applied several ways and methods, but I want to focus on 3 things for this post.

Red Hat: Cloud won't drive open-source adoption

Filed under
Linux

news.zdnet.com: Open standards and the need for interoperability on the cloud will not necessarily drive the adoption of open-source software, said a Red Hat executive.

PCLinuxOS 2009 Is Released?

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxosuser.blogspot: Although for some reasons, there has been no announcement so far as I know, PCLinuxOS 2009 had been released. I guess it's time for first impressions.

Also: PCLinuxOS 2009.1 is Released Today!

Outfit Your Netbook With Open Source: 21 Tools

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: These days everyone is looking for a bargain, and laptop manufacturers are eager to deliver. As you might expect, these cheaper netbooks often lack the performance and security features you'll find in higher-priced models. Fortunately, you can overcome many of these limitations – without spending an extra cent – by turning to open-source software.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Linux Foundation, Microsoft and Sun Debate Future of Operating Systems at Annual Collaboration Summit

  • Will Karmic Koala & A Bad Economy Conspire to Make Ubuntu The New Leader?
  • Ubuntu 9.04 (Alpha 5) Jocular Jack-O-Lantern Review
  • Risk report: Four years of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
  • Review of Linux Mint 6
  • Ubuntu in the workplace
  • Top 3 Threats to Microsoft: Apple, Linux, Pirating
  • Shameless product endorsement No. 5
  • Open source x86 router distro gains GUI
  • Comux 001011
  • New Peregrine build
  • Slax Linux
  • Pidgin 2.5.5
  • When Equivalents Aren't
  • GCC To Receive Automatic Parallelization Support
  • Downtime for download.opensuse.org
  • Debian Developers Conference call for speakers
  • Open Source Games Funding Survey
  • Taser Launches Headcam for Cops
  • Mozilla Developer News 03/10
  • openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 62
  • The Payola Didn’t Arrive On Time
  • Songbird 1.1 is here

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • gstreamer bug in Ubuntu and a temporary fix

  • opensuse kernle update, recompile
  • How To Reset Any Linux Password
  • Randomize lines in a file
  • Make your bash shell cool again
  • Copy package into chroot environment on Gentoo
  • Get To Know Linux: See Your Systems’ Memory Usage
  • How-To: Compile Programs From Source in Linux
  • Burning Xbox 360 Games on Linux (Stealth!)
  • What is ‘wheel’?
  • Commandline 101: Getting a Grip on Grep
  • CPU Scaling on Celeron M Notebooks
  • Adding new file extension on Kwrite
  • Random Educational Moment: modaliases
  • Add more features to your Right-Click Menu with Nautilus Pyextensions
  • Getting started with the yum package manager

Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring RC1 ready for tests

Filed under
MDV

blog.mandriva.com: The RC1 release of Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring (code name pomerol) is now available. This RC1 version provides some updates on major desktop components of the distribution, including KDE 4.2.1, GNOME 2.25.92, Xfce 4.6, X.org server 1.6, OpenOffice.Org 3.0.1, qt 4.5.0.

Fun with Puppy puplets

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: This article describes Puppy Linux, a flexible, fast distribution that's always a favorite among DesktopLinux readers. Author Dave Dibble briefly reviews MiPup2, one of many ready-made Puppy "puplets," and updates us on Puppy's current state and planned new features.

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More in Tux Machines

openSUSE Tumbleweed Is Now Powered by Linux Kernel 4.17, KDE Plasma 5.13 Landed

As of today, the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system is now powered by the latest and most advanced Linux 4.17 kernel series, which landed in the most recent snapshot released earlier. Tumbleweed snapshot 20180615 was released today, June 17, 2018, and it comes only two days after snapshot 20180613, which added the Mesa 18.1.1 graphics stack and KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment, along with many components of the latest KDE Applications 18.04.2 software suite. Today's snapshot 20180615 continued upgrading the KDE Applications software suite to version 18.04.2, but it also upgraded the kernel from Linux 4.16.12 to Linux 4.17.1. As such, OpenSuSE Tumbleweed is now officially powered by Linux kernel 4.17, so upgrading your installs as soon as possible would be a good idea. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

OSS Leftovers

  • Using Open Source Software in a SecDevOps Environment
    On 21 June 2018 the Open Source Software3 Institute is hosting a discussion that should be of high interest to enterprise technologists in the DC/Northern Virginia, Maryland area. From their invite: Come hear from our panelists about how the worlds of Open Source Software and the Secure Development / Operations (SecDevOps) intersect and strengthen one another. SecDevOps seeks to embed security in the development process as deeply as DevOps has done with operations, and Open Source Software is a major factor in Security, Development, and Operations. Tickets are free, but you need to register soon because seating is limited.
  • TenFourFox FPR8b1 available
    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 8 beta 1 is now available (downloads, release notes, hashes). There is much less in this release than I wanted because of a family member in the hospital and several technical roadblocks. Of note, I've officially abandoned CSS grid again after an extensive testing period due to the fact that we would need substantial work to get a functional implementation, and a partially functional implementation is worse than none at all (in the latter case, we simply gracefully degrade into block-level divs). I also was not able to finish the HTML input date picker implementation, though I've managed to still get a fair amount completed of it, and I'll keep working on that for FPR9. The good news is, once the date picker is done, the time picker will use nearly exactly the same internal plumbing and can just be patterned off it in the same way. Unlike Firefox's implementation, as I've previously mentioned our version uses native OS X controls instead of XUL, which also makes it faster. That said, it is a ghastly hack on the Cocoa widget side and required some tricky programming on 10.4 which will be the subject of a later blog post.
  • GNU dbm 1.15
    GDBM tries to detect inconsistencies in input database files as early as possible. When an inconcistency is detected, a helpful diagnostics is returned and the database is marked as needing recovery. From this moment on, any GDBM function trying to access the database will immediately return error code (instead of eventually segfaulting as previous versions did). In order to reconstruct the database and return it to healthy state, the gdbm_recover function should be used.

Server: GNU/Linux Dominance in Supercomputers, Windows Dominance in Downtime

  • Five Supercomputers That Aren't Supercomputers
    A supercomputer, of course, isn't really a "computer." It's not one giant processor sitting atop an even larger motherboard. Instead, it's a network of thousands of computers tied together to form a single whole, dedicated to a singular set of tasks. They tend to be really fast, but according to the folks at the International Supercomputing Conference, speed is not a prerequisite for being a supercomputer. But speed does help them process tons of data quickly to help solve some of the world's most pressing problems. Summit, for example, is already booked for things such as cancer research; energy research, to model a fusion reactor and its magnetically confined plasma tohasten commercial development of fusion energy; and medical research using AI, centering around identifying patterns in the function and evolution of human proteins and cellular systems to increase understanding of Alzheimer’s, heart disease, or addiction, and to inform the drug discovery process.
  • Office 365 is suffering widespread borkage across Blighty
     

    Some users are complaining that O365 is "completely unusable" with others are reporting a noticeable slowdown, whinging that it's taking 30 minutes to send and receive emails.