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Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Welcome the New Breed of Linux Users Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2015 - 8:04am
Story today's howtos Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2015 - 12:25am
Story today's leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2015 - 12:23am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2015 - 12:14am
Story Release: SymphonyOS 15.0 Rianne Schestowitz 02/02/2015 - 12:08am
Story GOL Survey Results: January Rianne Schestowitz 01/02/2015 - 8:14pm
Story 2014 was a record-breaking year for Android smartphones Rianne Schestowitz 01/02/2015 - 8:02pm
Story CoreOS 'Rockets' Ahead With Docker Alternative Rianne Schestowitz 01/02/2015 - 7:43pm
Story I Switched (Back) Over To Fedora As My Main OS & It's Going Great! Rianne Schestowitz 01/02/2015 - 7:37pm
Story Elementary Extensions for Python-EFL Rianne Schestowitz 01/02/2015 - 7:34pm

ThinkPad X300 and Linux - first impressions and power consumption issues

Filed under
Hardware

blog.gwright.org: Today I got down and installed Ubuntu 8.10 on this new X300, and things went rather smoothly. In terms of things that work, the list is rather good. However, I have noticed a few problems.

What's in a Number?

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: There's been a certain excitement in the blogosphere around the release of some figures about Firefox's market share in Europe. One thing that few seem to have picked up on is the unsatisfactory methodology behind these numbers.

Why games are the key to Linux adoption

Filed under
Linux

blog.andrewmin.com: I just ordered my first computer yesterday. It’s a real he-man’s gaming computer. But while these were all expensive (especially the video card), none of them compared to one item on the list: Windows. That’s the hope that Linux companies must look forward to.

Hands-on Linux: New versions of Ubuntu, Fedora and openSUSE

Filed under
Linux

computerworld.com: When you're talking Linux, three big names always pop up: Canonical's Ubuntu, Novell's openSUSE and Red Hat's Fedora. Each of these "big three" has recently released a new version of its distribution, which means it's time to check them out and decide which is No 1.

Look Back at KDE 2008

Filed under
KDE

digested.blogspot: The big news this year is the beginning of the KDE 4 series. On January 11, 2008 KDE 4.0 was released. KDE 4.1 was released on July 29, 2008.

Ts'o calls for pragmatic Debian

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Theodore Ts'o, Linux kernel developer and recently appointed CTO of the Linux Foundation, has called for more pragmatism from the Debian community. His comments were prompted by the recent bitter arguments over non-free firmware that lead to the resignation of Manoj Srivastava as Debian project secretary.

Coming up in 2009

Filed under
Linux

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: A lot has been written so far about what to expect next year — some valid, some not. But has that ever stopped me from joining the year-end pile-on? So here are 10 things to expect in 2009.

How To Set Up A Caching Reverse Proxy With Squid 2.6 On Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • First look: Linux kernel 2.6.28 officially released

  • New toy or new best friend?
  • Recording the Linux desktop -- the hard way
  • KDE Forum: Kourse 1 in Progress!
  • How to Create a Ubuntu Virtual Machine With QEMU Manager
  • Debian Lenny Release Date Confirmed
  • How to control Firefox using Vim keybindings
  • Who Owns the Netbook Trademark?
  • Enabling Gnome Numeric Keypad
  • LLVM Back-End For Gallium3D Almost There
  • Fedora and the WizardPen Tablet of Genius
  • Encrypting (almost) your entire hard drive with dm-crypt (LUKS) and lvm2, Part 2
  • Leaked Snow Leopard image potentially indicates a 32 / 64-bit divide
  • Catch-up and on-demand services on Ubuntu
  • Workaround for ICH9 Sound Problem on openSUSE 11.1
  • Ubuntu Usplash Smooth
  • Book Review: Ubuntu For Non-Geeks, 3rd Edition
  • Converting .mp4 to .ogv format
  • Linux Outlaws 70 - The Year 2008 in Review

Small Sister project protects against e-mail snoops

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com.au: The Small Sister open source privacy project has released a first beta of its SmallMail application, allowing individuals to send e-mail messages that can't be intercepted or traced by governments or snoops.

A Review of Linux Mint 6: Felicia

Filed under
Linux

meldroc.com: Linux Mint is a bit of a dark horse when compared with the big distros like Ubuntu, Debian, Red Hat or Gentoo. Don’t overlook it - it provides a great deal of polish that the Linux world has been looking for for a long time.

Yo Frankie! - Free Open Source Platform Game

Filed under
Gaming

makeuseof.com: We live in an economically ruled society. Especially in such a society, it’s nice to see something ‘unconditional’ from time to time.

2009: Netbook or notebook?

Filed under
Hardware

news.cnet.com: 2009 may be the year of the Netbook. But there's a big if. Here's the choice: Will consumers buy a thin, light, relatively fast $1,800 MacBook Air or a thin, light, ultrasmall, not-as-fast $700 Hewlett-Packard Mini 1000 Netbook?

Vespa: My Pink Dell Mini9 w/ Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware

princessleia.com: I’ve wanted a pink laptop for ages, this Christmas a few of my friends got together and pitched in to buy me the pink Dell Mini9 I’d been drooling over for months.

Aircraft Manager: Save Battery By Turning Off WiFi and Bluetooth

Filed under
Software

ubuntumini.com: One of the sacrifices I had to make when choosing to install Ubuntu 8.10 was that there would be no way to turn off wifi and bluetooth. The battery would drain faster because I would have to keep them powered when not using them. Recently it was brought to my attention that there is a Aircraft Manager .deb.

Linux 2.6.28 Kernel Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: The Linux 2.6.28 kernel was released this past week in time for the holidays. This quarterly update to the Linux kernel brought the stabilization of the EXT4 file-system, the Graphics Execution Manager, a host of new drivers, and a variety of other updates. For some weekend benchmarking we had tested the latest Linux 2.6.28 kernel.

Linux vs Windows . . . TomTom GPS

Filed under
Software

tycheent.wordpress: My wife gifted me with a TomTom ONE 125 GPS navigator. On charging it up and connecting it to my computer, I discovered that Microsoft had struck again.

What is a Window Manager

Filed under
HowTos

computingtech.blogspot: X-windows is a system that divides the labor up quite a bit. An X-windows application draws and controls only the area "inside" the window, the so-called client area. A totally separate program, called a "window manager" paints the borders and controls (such as resizing edges, maximize, minimize, and close buttons).

Why Current Linux-Preinstalls Pose Adoption Problems for Netbook Users

Filed under
Linux

molkentin.de/blog: This christmas, Santa brought an Acer Aspire One (A110L) for my mother, a not so techy person. It's supposed to be simple and useful. And at first glance, that's true: It comes with Firefox, OpenOffice, etc. Unfortunately, there is also a downside.

Novell Calls Off BrainShare 2009

Filed under
SUSE

linuxinsider.com: Novell Inc. said Wednesday it has canceled its 2009 BrainShare, the annual conference that this year drew 5,500 to the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City.

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More in Tux Machines

Critical Live Boot Bug Fixed and Ubuntu 18.04 is Finally Released

A critical bug in live boot session delayed Ubuntu 18.04 LTS release for several hours. The bug has been fixed and the ISO are available to download. Read more

Nintendo Switch hack + Dolphin Emulator could bring GameCube and Wii game support

This week security researchers released details about a vulnerability affecting NVIDIA Tegra X1 processors that makes it possible to bypass secure boot and run unverified code on some devices… including every Nintendo Switch game console that’s shipped to date. Among other things, this opens the door for running modified versions of Nintendo’s firmware, or alternate operating systems such as a GNU/Linux distribution. And if you can run Linux… you can also run Linux applications. Now it looks like one of those applications could be the Dolphin emulator, which lets you play Nintendo GameCube and Wii games on a computer or other supported devices. Read more

Openwashing Leftovers

Linux Foundation: New Members, Cloud Foundry, and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit

  • 41 Organizations Join The Linux Foundation to Support Open Source Communities With Infrastructure and Resources
    The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, announced the addition of 28 Silver members and 13 Associate members. Linux Foundation members help support development of the shared technology resources, while accelerating their own innovation through open source leadership and participation. Linux Foundation member contributions help provide the infrastructure and resources that enable the world's largest open collaboration communities.
  • Cloud Foundry for Developers: Architecture
    Back in the olden days, provisioning and managing IT stacks was complex, time-consuming, and error-prone. Getting the resources to do your job could take weeks or months. Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) was the first major step in automating IT stacks, and introduced the self-service provisioning and configuration model. VMware and Amazon were among the largest early developers and service providers. Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) adds the layer to IaaS that provides application development and management. Cloud Foundry is for building Platform as a Service (PaaS) projects, which bundle servers, networks, storage, operating systems, middleware, databases, and development tools into scalable, centrally-managed hardware and software stacks. That is a lot of work to do manually, so it takes a lot of software to automate it.
  • Jonathan Corbet on Linux Kernel Contributions, Community, and Core Needs
    At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report. The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.