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Tuesday, 20 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Seven Tips To Get The Most From Your New Android Smartphone Rianne Schestowitz 26/12/2014 - 3:54am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 26/12/2014 - 12:30am
Story Hands-on with PCLinuxOS: A terrific release Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 10:19pm
Story OPNFV Plans Next Steps for Open Source NFV, SDN Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:52pm
Story 2014: A Banner Year for Open Source Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:45pm
Story IsoHunt releases roll-your-own Pirate Bay Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:32pm
Story Open Source Meritocracy Is More Than a Joke Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:27pm
Story Linux Kernel Developers Consider Live Kernel Patching Solution Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:21pm
Story A real-time editing tool for Wikipedia Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:14pm
Story ​Linux and open source 2014: It was the best of years, it was the worst of years Roy Schestowitz 25/12/2014 - 9:11pm

KDE4 apps: Dolphin

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KDE Dolphin is the default file manager for KDE4. It is very powerful, offering many functionalities. The developers have focused on the functionality of Dolphin - being a file manager. As a long-time user, I can say it is a very proud substitute for its older brother, Konqueror.

Linux boot sequence visualized

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Linux This is a visualization of a linux boot sequence where each function is a node and each edge represents a function call, direct branch, or indirect branch. Nodes are laid out using an unweighted force-directed layout algorithm, where each node is simulated as if it were electrically repulsive and had springs between nodes.

Fragmentation And Linux

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linuxcanuck.wordpress: Windows users are familiar with fragmentation. When you have fragmentation, it means that it is time to do some drive maintenance. With Linux it takes on another meaning, since Linux drives are not as prone to fragmentation. To get fragmentation in Linux all you need to do is put two users in the same room.

Google's Chrome now works on Linux, crudely

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Software Google is tight-lipped about the Linux version of its Chrome browser, but the company's programmers have proved a bit more forthcoming with a brief announcement that they have a crude version of Chrome working on Linux.

Google Gadgets for Linux: Eye-Candy or Useful?

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Software Released in June, Google Gadgets for Linux provides about the same functionality of Vista sidebar or Mac OS X dashboard. While other solutions like ‘gdesklets’ are pretty popular within the linux crowd, Google’s’ platform provides compatibility with both gadgets written for the Windows version and the huge repository of web-centered gadgets. Let’s take it for a spin and see if it’s worth installing.

Web camera support in Your Favorite Linux

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Linux If you're using Internet, there's a fair chance you're using some sort of instant messaging, voice, video - or both - telephony or other communication tools to stay in touch with people all over the world. Web cameras play a big part in Internet communication. The crucial question is, can you use these devices on your laptops, should they have Linux installed on them?

Kubuntu 8.10 + KDE 4 = Failed

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Ubuntu After installing the latest KDE flavor of Ubuntu last night, I am supposed to write my initial impressions about it today, and I expected it to be good. Unfortunately, something unexpected happened. Kubuntu 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex" failed miserably after the installation.

Splashtop moves into netbooks

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Linux The Splashtop instant-on Linux environment is included in the new Lenovo IdeaPad S10e netbook, marking the product's first appearance in that form factor. That news should come as no surprise, since netbooks' ultra-portability is a natural match for Splashtop's instant-on.

Demand for Linux PCs varies across Asia

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Linux Linux-based PCs have reportedly been getting a bad rap for consumer resistance, but manufacturers say demand for them varies between the different Asian markets.

Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10 64 bit Review

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Ubuntu I waited a few days to let the load on the servers cool down so I could try Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex 8.10 out on my new Dell Inspiron 530 system. For those who don’t know, a 32 bit OS can’t address over 4 gigs of memory. So 64 bit is quickly becoming a necessity with the systems coming out today.

Sapphire Radeon HD 4830 512MB

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Hardware The launch of the RV770 GPU earlier this year by AMD was quite successful. The Radeon HD 4850 and Radeon HD 4870 series feature best-in-class performance. If you are looking for leading performance and all of the bells and whistles on the newest ATI graphics cards but at a lower cost, AMD recently introduced the Radeon HD 4830.

13 Great Linux Videos!

Linux does not need multi-million advertising on top TV networks!
Every one of us can spread the word, with such high quality videos.

Installing And Using OpenVZ On Ubuntu 8.10

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In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare an Ubuntu 8.10 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project.

Linux Setup iSCSI Target ( SAN )

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Linux target framework (tgt) aims to simplify various SCSI target driver (iSCSI, Fibre Channel, SRP, etc) creation and maintenance. The key goals are the clean integration into the scsi-mid layer and implementing a great portion of tgt in user space.

today's leftovers

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  • Linux Printing: A Curious Mix of Yuck and Excellence, part 1

  • What’s unique about openSUSE?
  • 50 Essential Open Source Security Tools
  • USB MiniMe 2008 install from Windows
  • Linux powered Yoggie goes open source
  • Does cb2bib remove drudgery from bibliography creation?
  • Level of Effort and Empowerment
  • 10 ways to amuse a geek
  • G1G1 coming to Europe Nov. 17
  • The license wars are over
  • Windows: The pit stop on the road to open source
  • Next generation C++ "goes beta"
  • IPFire, the Lean Linux firewall
  • Exploring VIM configurations

some howtos:

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  • Installing and Setting Up Avant Window Navigator

  • Ubuntu, the absolute beginners guide
  • Installing a vanilla Firefox in Kubuntu Intrepid
  • Developing with libyui/libzypp & python - part4
  • Relaying Postfix SMTP via
  • Ubuntu Ignored Ickthyopterix 8.10 Static IP Bug
  • A Secure Nagios Server
  • Convert Flac To Ogg Vorbis In Three (Easy) Steps
  • Ubuntu 10 things in a terminal
  • Ways To Grab Screenshots In Ubuntu

Specialty Linuxes to the rescue

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Linux Six sweet distributions that can boot from a pen drive, run in a sliver of RAM, rejuvenate an old system, or recover data from a dead PC.

File Roller is a piece of sh*t

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linuxd.wordpress: I never liked File Roller, and now I’ve got proof it sucks. Besides terrible usability, it handles partitioned rar files very badly. By partitioned I mean when a rar file is separated into .r00 .r01 etc parts, by very badly I mean it can’t handle it at all.

Open-source companies crashing en masse? Puh-lease!

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news.cnet: Remember Trip Chowdhry, the analyst with Global Equities Research? He's the guy who said that Red Hat is rubbish, and that the entire LAMP stack is potty, too. Given how far off Chowdhry was then, it's perhaps no surprise that he's now claiming that "'almost every VC funded open-source company is struggling and will run out of funds within the next six months."

LZMA compression becoming the better choice

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Software If you have not heard about it, certainly start reading up on it and DO use it. If your using bzip2 currently then your going to like this even more.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, Synopsys/Black Duck FUD, and Software Security Over Convenience

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • With Much of the Data Center Stack Open Source, Security is a Special Challenge [Ed: Black attacking FOSS again in order to sell its proprietary products; does proprietary software have no security issues? Which cannot be fixed, either?]
  • Synopsys reveals its open-source rookies of the year [Ed: Anti-FOSS company Black Duck, which markets its proprietary software by attacking FOSS (it admitted being anti-GPL since inception, created by Microsoft employee), wants the public to think of it as a FOSS authority]
  • Software security over convenience
    Recently I got inspired (paranoid ?) by my boss who cares a lot about software security. Previously, I had almost the same password on all the websites I used, I had them synced to google servers (Chrome user previously), but once I started taking software security seriously, I knew the biggest mistake I was making was to have a single password everywhere, so I went one step forward and set randomly generated passwords on all online accounts and stored them in a keystore.

MIPI-CSI camera kit runs Linux on Apollo Lake

Congatec’s rugged, Linux-driven “Conga-CAM-KIT/MIPI” camera kit combines its Intel Apollo Lake based Conga-PA5 SBC with a MIPI-CSI 2 camera from Leopard Imaging and other components. Congatec announced a Conga-CAM-KIT/MIPI camera kit, also referred to as the MIPI-CSI 2 Smart Camera Kit. The kit runs a Yocto Project based Linux distribution on Congatec’s Conga-PA5, a Pico-ITX SBC with Intel’s Apollo Lake Atom, Pentium, and Celeron SoCs. Also included is a MIPI-CSI 2 camera (LI-AR023Z-YUV-MIP) from Leopard Imaging based on ON Semiconductor’s AR0237 HD sensor. Extended temperature ranges are supported. Read more

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