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Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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PC-BSD Day 1: extending the system

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: On this first day with PC-BSD I sat down to extend the system. For one, I was curious whether I could play my MP3 files out of the box and -if not- how easy it was to remedy that. Secondly, I wanted to install a program for offline blogging.

Xubuntu 7.04 on a 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: Well, after an egregiously long time, I seem to have finally finished installing Xubuntu 7.04 on the World’s Ugliest Laptop, and the results are … well, I’ll let you judge.

Linux: The Really Simple Really Fair Scheduler

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In an effort to fully understand the math proposed by Roman Zippel in his Really Fair Scheduler, Ingo Molnar implemented a simplified version of the logic on top of his Completely Fair Scheduler code which he then humorously labeled the Really Simple Really Fair Scheduler.

The shell challenge: changing another process’ working directory

Filed under
HowTos

rudd-o: Don’t you hate it when you leave a shell open and you can’t unmount a disk volume because the shell has a firm grip on a directory in that disk? Well, there’s a solution.

ISO approval: comparing ODF to OOXML

Filed under
OSS

masuran.org: I recently got into a discussion with some OOXML backers about whether or not OOXML can/should be made an ISO standard. To support my argument that the OOXML specification can't be fixed with a BRM, I've decided to compare the comments that were addressed at the ODF BRM and the ones that will have to be addressed at the OOXML BRM.

Configuring your webcam to work under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you want the old-time GNU/Linux experience, try configuring a Web camera. Unlike most peripherals, webcams are generally not configured during installation. Moreover, where printers have the Common Unix Printing System (CUPS) and its interfaces, with webcams you are generally thrown back on whatever resources you can find on the Internet and your own knowledge of kernel modules and drivers.

Automatix Backlash: Why the Hate?

Filed under
Software

OSWeekly: In order for Automatix to be as hated as it has become by a select few, we need to first examine the reasons why the application is allegedly being targeted with such harsh words. With this article, we will closely examine why.

First impressions: Opera 9.5 alpha a worthy contender

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Opera has always defied conventional wisdom: in the past, the company was able to survive by selling web browsers when Microsoft and Netscape were giving them away. More recently, the company shifted to giving away its desktop browser. Now, the company has released alpha builds of the latest version of their desktop product, Opera 9.5.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • My Favorite Open Source Business Models

  • Linux is Alright
  • Open source acquisitions, time to grow up?
  • PhpGedView puts your ancestors on the Web
  • Ian Murdock: Where's the War?
  • GP2X-F200 Video
  • Time to Show More Oxygen
  • GPLv3 up 19% over last week
  • Layers of Ubuntu

Snort on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

Filed under
HowTos

searchsecurity.techtarget: Intrusion detection and intrusion prevention systems (IDS and IPS, respectively) provide the ability to inspect and analyse network traffic and either generate alerts or drop traffic in the event that an attack or a malicious event is detected. We're going to demonstrate.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • MAC address packet filtering using IPTables

  • A Couple Ways to Debug mod_rewrite
  • A nifty little trick for Openbox Arch
  • Howto: Openfire - Ubuntu 6.06 LTS LAMP
  • Making an Ubuntu Server - Part 1: The Plan
  • Which interface is eth0?
  • Tree view of directories and file listings from command line

Firefox 3: A look at its new security features

Filed under
Moz/FF

techrepublic blogs: Mozilla Firefox is one of the most popular web browsers around today. But what does the Mozilla team have in store for us along security lines? To find out, let’s take a look at the pre-release version of Firefox 3 (code-named Gran Paradiso 1.9 Alpha 7).

Also: Mozilla debuts new Firefox first run page
And: Help Mozilla Test Gran Paradiso Alpha 7

Edubuntu to the rescue again

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet: I finally had a chance to meet with our new librarian today. After being without an actual librarian for so long, it was incredibly cool to talk with someone who knew something more about academic research than how to Google. And best of all, she said, “I’m not afraid of learning new things. Why don’t you set up a server with one of the open source systems and I’ll give it a shot.”

X.org releases version 7.3, gets hotplugging support

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Today marked the mildly delayed new release of X.org version 7.3, which corresponds to server version 1.4. The X.org community has been working out the last of the bugs since their code-base became semi-frozen on August 1st and are now confident that the release will be worth the wait.

Or: X.Org 7.3 Release Gets Delayed, Again

How a Microsoft Piracy Threat almost led us to Open Source… Almost!

Filed under
Microsoft

Tryst with Linux: Once upon a time there was a ’school’ that used predominantly Microsoft software. This ’school’ used PCs with Windows Servers and Windows XPs. The fact that this was a poor ’school’ meant that they couldn’t afford MS Office. They wanted to, but they couldn’t. So they installed the academic licences of StarOffice 7. All was good in the world.

Linux Job Market Trends: Galloping Forward

Filed under
Linux

datamation: The numbers, clearly, point to a major industry trend. Recent reports showing dramatic Linux job growth reflects a multi-year trend, says Paul Melde, Dice’s VP of technology. “I think what it really shows is continued strength in Linux job growth numbers,”

Red Hat High campers are bridging the digital divide

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: One of the things Red Hat CEO Matthew Szulik loses sleep over is the digital divide, especially when it comes to children. He wanted to do something about the disparity in the availability of computing resources and skills between social classes, so he set aside corporate funds to create Red Hat High, a week-long technology summer camp for eighth- and ninth-grade students.

Why you really can't use 'Linux' as a screen name on the Xbox 360

linux-watch: When the news broke about it being impossible to use Linux as a screen name on the Xbox 360 it sounded like such a Microsoft thing to do. Alas, the real reason why you can't use Linux as a screen name is much more mundane.

Firefox Performance Guides

Filed under
Moz/FF

lxpages.com: Since we know that many of our visitors are Firefox users, we’ve compiled a huge list of Firefox tips, tricks and tutorials to boost browsing performance and more efficient.

Mandriva 2008 RC1 out, shiny things ahoy

Filed under
MDV

adamw: We pushed 2008 RC1 today. There’s been a ton of bug fixing since Beta 2, so this should be quite a lot better. Cooker has been very busy lately: a couple of major changes have happened.

Also: Mandriva Linux 2008 RC1 released

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Open source docks with mainstream vendors

Open source and mainstream are joining forces this week as the Docker software containerisation platform comes under the spotlight at technology-focused network and information sessions in Cape Town and Johannesburg. "The diversity of our partners at the event − Docker, Microsoft Azure, Atlassian, SUSE and HPE – is a clear indication of the excitement around the Docker platform," says Muggie van Staden, MD of Obsidian Systems. Read more

What’s the best Linux firewall distro of 2017?

You don’t have to manage a large corporate network to use a dedicated firewall. While your Linux distro will have an impressive firewall – and an equally impressive arsenal of tools to manage it – the advantages don’t extend to the other devices on your network. A typical network has more devices connected to the internet than the total number of computers and laptops in your SOHO. With the onslaught of IoT, it won’t be long before your router doles out IP addresses to your washing machine and microwave as well. The one thing you wouldn’t want in this Jetsonian future is having to rely on your router’s limited firewall capabilities to shield your house – and everyone in it – from the malicious bits and bytes floating about on the internet. A dedicated firewall stands between the internet and internal network, sanitising the traffic flowing into the latter. Setting one up is an involved process both in terms of assembling the hardware and configuring the software. However, there are quite a few distros that help you set up a dedicated firewall with ease, and we’re going to look at the ones that have the best protective open source software and roll them into a convenient and easy to use package. Read more

Zorin OS 12 Business Edition Launches with macOS, Unity, and GNOME 2 Layouts

Three months after launching the biggest release ever of the Ubuntu-based operating system, the Zorin OS team is today announcing the availability of Zorin OS 12 Business Edition. Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel, Zorin OS 12 Business Edition ships with the innovative Zorin Desktop 2.0 desktop environment that offers multiple layouts for all tastes. These means that you can make your Zorin OS 12 desktop look like macOS, GNOME 2, or Unity with a click. Read more

GNOME and Other Software

  • Nautilus 3.24 – The changes
    Since Nautilus was created, if a user wanted to open a folder where the user didn’t have permissions, for example a system folder where only root has access, it was required to start Nautilus with sudo. However running UI apps under root is strongly discouraged, and to be honest, quite inconvenient. Running any UI app with sudo is actually not even supported in Wayland by design due to the security issues that that conveys.
  • GNOME hackaton in Brno
    Last week, we had a presentation on Google Summer of Code and Outreachy at Brno University of Technology. Around 80 students attended which was a pretty good success considering it was not part of any course. It was a surprise for the uni people as well because the room they booked was only for 60 ppl.
  • Peek Gif Recorder Gets Updated, Now Available from a PPA
    Peek, the nifty animated gif screen capture app for Linux desktops, has been updated. Peek 0.9 reduces the size of temporary files, adds a resolution downsampling option (to help the app use fewer resources when rendering your gif), and introduces fallback support for avconf should ffmpeg be unavailable.
  • Cerebro is an Open Source OS X Spotlight Equivalent for Linux
    Billed as an ‘open-source productivity booster with a brain’, Cerebro is an Electron app able to run across multiple platforms. It’s an extendable, open-source alternative to Spotlight and Alfred on macOS, and Synapse, Kupfer, Ulauncher, GNOME Do, and others on Linux.
  • JBoss Fuse 6.3 integration services for Red Hat OpenShift released
    Red Hat announced the latest update to the Red Hat JBoss Fuse-based integration service on Red Hat OpenShift. With the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud-based SaaS systems, and new data streams, organizations can face increasing pressure to more quickly deliver innovative new services. Traditional centralized, monolithic ESB-style integration approaches are often ill-suited to support the business in responding to this pressure.
  • Fedora 25: The perf linux tool.
  • Meet the chap open-sourcing US govt code – Paul, an ex-Microsoft anti-piracy engineer [Ed: Used to work for Microsoft and now spreads the GPL ("cancer" according to Microsoft) in the US government]
    The manager of the project, Berg said, really wanted to release MOOSE as open source, but didn't know how to do so. As a result it took 18 months to traverse government bureaucracy and to obtain the necessary permissions. It's now available under the GPL 2.1 license.