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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Rackspace Brings the OpenStack Cloud to Bare Metal Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 4:12pm
Story Top 4 Linux VoIP clients Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 4:06pm
Story KDE 4.13.2 Is Now Available In Manjaro 0.8.10 Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 3:59pm
Story Mozilla puts a development environment into the browser with WebIDE Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 3:54pm
Story Open source hindered by OOXML incompatibilities Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 3:50pm
Story Canonical Debuts 'Orange Box' for Ubuntu OpenStack Cloud Demos Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 12:15pm
Story RUSSIA FINALLY MOVING TO */LINUX Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 12:07pm
Story Stroke and gestures now on Raspberry Pi touch screen Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 11:53am
Story Feasibility of desktop on ARM cpu Rianne Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 11:41am
Story Open-Source Radeon Performance Boosted By Linux 3.16 Roy Schestowitz 23/06/2014 - 8:58am

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Back on the Linux bandwagon

  • Enable DVD Playback, Flash and MP3 Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu on Windows with Wubi
  • Known hardy bugs and workarounds
  • gimpsvn.sh — Install or update to GIMP 2.5 from SVN on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron nests at Fox News
  • A Smart Feature of Ubuntu You May Not Have Noticed
  • Installing Four Other Desktop Edition on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu removing XML from Python?
  • Fun with Amazon S3 in Ubuntu

Compiz Fusion Community News for May 7th, 2008: An edition of bling and subtlty

Filed under
Software

More CF news is down the tubes this week, major highlights being A FULL sphere deformation mode for cubeaddon, A subtler static applications switcher, and A subtler set a viewport switching plugins.

The Year of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: This is it. It’s now. Like it or not, you can quiver in your boots and moan about this driver or that hardware or the other usability feature, but I have two, solid irrefutable signs of the apocalypse.

Valve's Source Engine Coming To Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: There have been rumors since last year that Valve may be serious about porting Source games to Linux after Valve Software began seeking a senior software engineer with the responsibility of porting Windows-based games to the Linux platform.

Linux Web services with Apache Synapse

Filed under
News

Discover Apache Synapse, a high-performance enterprise service bus with simple configuration, extensible architecture, and a minimal footprint. It is a versatile tool that you can use for a variety of tasks. This article examines how you can use Apache Synapse to create mock Web services.

Cairo-Dock is pain free eye candy

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: It's a weird phenomenon. Nearly every computer platform steals another one's look. Vista gets accused of trying to look too much like OS X. Linux desktops get accused of trying to look like Vista (except when they're accused of ripping off OS X).

Running Only on Open-Source Software

Filed under
OSS

eweek.com: Open-source software has found increasing acceptance within IT for infrastructure application - but many may still wonder, 'Is it possible to run a company almost entirely with open-source offerings?'

Does a Linux OS perform better than a Windows ?

Filed under
Linux

itvoir.com: No doubt Windows is still the candy of each user’s eye but Linux has evolved over a span and made its presence felt strongly in the market gradually. With many add ons as compared to Windows, there are a few interesting features about Linux.

Moonlighting Linux: the future of rich web apps

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: As we know, static HTML web sites are passé. Yet, Java applets never turned out to be the killer online application platform they possibly could have been. The modern introduction of Ajax has undoubtedly improved the web experience but it’s not a panacea. Here’s how to get started using the Moonlight development technology from the Mono Project.

Windows-based EeePC cheaper than Linux one

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

apcmag.com: Is ASUS in bed with Microsoft? The new XP-based EeePC 900 will actually be cheaper than the Linux-based version.

Slackware 12.1: Do-it-yourself-NUX

Filed under
Slack

techiemoe.com: Slackware is perhaps the closest thing on the market right now to a "generic" Linux distribution. You won't find branded wallpapers, special bootsplash screens, or really much at all that identifies your system as "Slackware" other than the LILO prompt.

OpenSolaris is here to stay

Filed under
OS

blogbeebe.blogspot: I've never gotten angrier after reading a blog post like I did after read Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols' post "OpenSolaris Arrive just to Die". The crux of sjvn's argument is: Still, all that said, I think OpenSolaris could survive, and possibly even thrive, if it wasn’t for one sad, simple fact.

OpenOffice.org 3 beta is ready for testing

Filed under
OOo

openoffice.org: The OpenOffice.org Community is pleased to announce that the public beta release of OpenOffice.org 3.0 is now available. This beta release is made available to allow a broad user base to test and evaluate the next major version of OpenOffice.org.

KDE 4.0.4 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: he KDE Community today announced the immediate availability of KDE 4.0.4, the fourth bugfix and maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Miniature Linux PC targets military apps

  • Free Flash community reacts to Adobe Open Screen Project
  • Meet Inna Kuznetsova, IBM's Linux Strategy Director (video)
  • Lost in Linux Land 2
  • Essential Linux Device Drivers
  • A Brief History of Sun by Groklaw's grouch
  • Qt rev'd
  • Commentary: What's the deal with embedded Linux?
  • OpenSolaris Wants To Compete With Linux - Oh Yeah?
  • For gorsake, stop laughing, this is Linux!
  • Is open source dead?
  • Open source as the villain in its own story
  • OpenSolaris Just Wants to be Free
  • OLPC tries to bridge gap with developer community
  • OOXML expert: ODF flaws remain
  • Get some AIR on Linux
  • Reinventing OpenSolaris
  • It's official: The future of Sun/MySQL is open...and closed
  • DRM and unintended consequences

Everyone loves the Eee

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

zdnet.com: I spent the day at a conference sponsored by our SIS developer. What’s interesting, however, was the participants’ reactions to an Asus Eee PC that one of the other attendees brought with her.

GNU/Linux: Source Code and Human Rights

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: James Maguire, Datamation's managing editor, claims he has no interest in software whose source code is available for editing. "I'm not a software engineer," he says. "If I can't grab it off the shelf, I can't use it." He's half-joking, of course. But he echoes the opinion of many people outside the community.

Getting ready for Dragonfly...

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Today we released the first alpha of our new web developer tool. The objective for this first alpha release is to get feedback and of course allow you to start using it. You should expect it to be buggy and even missing some key features, but that is what alpha means.

Thoughts on CommunityOne and OpenSolaris

Joe Brockmeier: Sun finally pushed out its Project Indiana yesterday, in the form of a packaged version of OpenSolaris that looks quite a lot like a Linux distro — minus, of course, the kernel that gives Linux its name. On the one hand, I’m pleased to see any FOSS project moving forward. On the other hand, I’m wondering what problems Sun can solve with OpenSolaris that it can’t solve by participating in the Linux community?

The Grumpy Editor encounters the Hardy Heron

Filed under
Ubuntu

Jonathan Corbet (LWN): Shortly before heading off to the Linux Foundation's Collaboration Summit, the laptop got moved to the Ubuntu "Hardy Heron" distribution. Needless to say, there have been some interesting ups and downs (literally) since then.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.