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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mageia 2 On Its Way srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 10:20pm
Story Mint solves Unity challenge srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 10:14pm
Story Ubuntu: Wake up and smell the Unity srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 10:10pm
Story Flowering of Open Innovation srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 9:53pm
Story The Koha Saga: A gift that keeps giving srlinuxx 1 29/11/2011 - 9:49pm
Story Open-source skills best hope for landing a good job srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 8:07pm
Story Ubuntu will now track Mozilla updates srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 8:03pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 29/11/2011 - 10:13am
Forum topic How do I a rebel bride - wedding location Edition bancroft 29/11/2011 - 9:42am
Story The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 12 (Lisa) falko 29/11/2011 - 8:57am

Why out of the box Linux performance is still important

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Recently I reviewed Linux Mint KDE edition and concluded that it's probably missed it's window for success now that distros like Ubuntu are now supplying codecs (etc) on demand. But someone posted a comment that made me second guess my judgement.

All roads lead to Debian

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If most of the Linux distributions derive from either Slackware or Debian, why not just go to the source? Slackware looks way too hard to figure out, but Debian, which just released version 4.0, offers an net-install ISO, so I burned the CD this morning and am currently installing a Debian system over the Internet.

SimplyMEPIS 6.5

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Getting the distribution

Getting it was no big deal. There where enough mirror-servers to choose from, all high-speed, although I find it peculiar that downloading via torrent was not an option, which probably would lead to less load on the mirrors, especially when a new version is released.

Bob Metcalfe re-evaluates open source

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Bob Metcalfe may not have invented the Internet, but few people's technical achievements have done more to make it popular and accessible than the father of Ethernet and founder of 3Com. Metcalfe and the open source community got a little bit sideways with each other last century, but that appears to be all in the past now.

Xubuntu’s crisis of identity

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I love Xubuntu. If you were to knock down the door to my house and come charging in to where the computer is, there’s a much higher chance that you’d see a Xubuntu icon on the screen than the logo of any other complete, prepackaged distro.

Create a Customized Live Linux CD or Bootable USB Thumb Drive Using Knoppix

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Earlier this year, I was asked to find a bootable CD that would allow PCs in a special purpose lab, many of which had bad hard drives, to access our Citrix environment. Basically, we wanted to turn these PCs into thin clients to extend their life. I had been experimenting with Knoppix and decided it was time to try customizing my own Knoppix CD for use in the lab.

Ghana pursuing open source policy - Minister

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The government of Ghana is serious about free and open source software. This is according to Ghanaian communications minister Mike Oquaye who was speaking at a free and open source software media training conference in Ghana's capital Accra yesterday.

Google releases enhancement patches for MySQL

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Google uses MySQL open source database for some of it’s application. They have released some enhancement patches for MySQL under GPL license. They would like MySQL team to integrate those patches into the MySQL code and until they do that, Google has released the code under GPL license for anyone to use them.

Is Ubuntu enterprise ready?

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Anyone who follows Linux at all knows that Ubuntu is currently the Linux community's favorite distribution. But can Canonical Ltd., the company behind Ubuntu, translate that popular success into business success?

Intel vs. OLPC: A Battle of Good Wills

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For Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, the president of Brazil, deciding what computer to give his country's youth requires more than a trip to the nearest CompUSA. He's deciding between two models of specially designed, affordable laptops, one manufactured by Intel and the other by the OLPC (One Laptop per Child) Association.

KDE4 Devel Live-CD Review: Work in Progress

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A few days ago first KDE4 CD images presenting the current development version of KDE4 have been published in the Internet (as a custom openSUSE Live-CD). Nobody should expect that this version is close to the final product.

Latest Mambo release fully translatable

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Team Mambo have announced the release of version 4.6.2 of the Mambo Open Source content management system (CMS). Released under the GNU Public Licence, it can be downloaded freely from here.

Interview with the KTorrent developers

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One of the most hotly debated topics about the Internet today is, without a doubt, BitTorrent: the most popular peer-to-peer network protocol today. Why is it controversial? Because clients (applications) for BitTorrent file transfer proved to be first choice of people sharing and downloading movies and music from the Internet.

PCLinuxOS launching hardware certification program

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The PCLinuxOS Hardware Database (HWDB) collects user-submitted reports on the compatibility of various hardware with the PCLinuxOS distribution. Now its founder has announced a plan to begin a hardware certification program for personal computer manufacturers.

Free computing! How to revitalize mature pentiums

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Free software is great, so why not run it on a free PC? Here’s how to get a free PC and configure it with free software to perform many tasks as well as a newly-purchased computer.

Sniffing out a PC

How uses the LAMP stack to scale upward

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Software credits two particular features of its LAMP (Linux Apache MySQL PHP) server cluster for helping the news aggregation site maintain speedy performance in the face of high growth.

SMPlayer - Best Frontend For MPlayer

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SMPlayer intends to be a complete front-end for MPlayer, from basic features like playing videos, DVDs, and VCDs to more advanced features like support for MPlayer filters and more.

GIMP 2.3.16 Development Release

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Getting closer to the 2.4 release, GIMP 2.3.16 is another development snapshot. The source code can be downloaded from the usual places. Check the NEWS file for an overview of the changes in this release. If you want to try this unstable development snapshot, please read the release notes for the development releases.

Changes in GIMP 2.3.16

CentOS 5: Linux for Grownups

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Some folks love life on the edge, so they run Debian Unstable, or the newest Ubuntu or Fedora releases. These are all wonderful Linux distributions, and under most circumstances are reliable enough.

DistroWatch News: Top Ten Distributions

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Today we interrupt our regular schedule of distribution release announcements to draw the attention of readers to our newly updated Top Ten Distributions page. This page is an unbiased attempt to list the most widely-used distributions available today, complete with brief overviews of their history, purpose, pros and cons, available editions, and possible alternatives.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • i2pd 2.10 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses. I2P client is a software used for building and using anonymous I2P networks. Such networks are commonly used for anonymous peer-to-peer applications (filesharing, cryptocurrencies) and anonymous client-server applications (websites, instant messengers, chat-servers). I2P allows people from all around the world to communicate and share information without restrictions.
  • Pixeluvo Review | Photo Editor for Linux & Windows
    A review of Pixeluvo, a great photo editor available on Linux and Windows. Pixeluvo is not free or open source.
  • Blit, A Retrospective On My Largest Project Ever
    I’ve always been someone who’s liked art and programming. Especially combining the two. One of my favorite genres is pixel art, or sprites as they are also known. I’ve dabbled in making a few other art programs before, but nothing like this. Originally Blit supposed to be only a sprite animation tool that had a modern look and feel, but my ideas for it grew greater (*sigh* feature creep). There are many other sprinting tools out there like GrafX2, Aseprite, (and other 2D animation programs like TVPaint). I’m not saying that it’s wrong that they make their own GUI toolkit, but it feels kind of odd. I really wanted to bring these types of programs out of the days of the Amiga. After doing some initial research, I settled on using Qt.
  • An alert on the upcoming 7.51.0 release
    In two weeks time, on Wednesday November 2nd, we will release curl and libcurl 7.51.0 unless something earth shattering happens.
  • Desktop Gmail Client `WMail` 2.0.0 Stable Released
    WMail is a free, open source desktop client for Gmail and Google Inbox, available for Linux, Windows, and Mac.
  • SpaceView: Ubuntu File System Usage Indicator
  • FunYahoo++: New Yahoo Messenger Plugin For Pidgin / libpurple [PPA]
    Yahoo retired its old Messenger protocol in favor of a new one, breaking compatibility with third-party applications, such as Pidgin, Empathy, and so on. Eion Robb, the SkypeWeb and Hangouts developer, has created a replacement Yahoo prpl plugin, called FunYahoo++, that works with the new Yahoo Messenger protocol. Note that I tested the plugin with Pidgin, but it should work with other instant messaging applications that support libpurple, like BitlBee or Empathy.
  • GCC Lands Loop Splitting Optimization
    The latest GCC 7 development code has an optimization pass now for loop splitting.
  • GCC 7 To End Feature Development Next Month
    Friday's GCC 7 status report indicates the feature freeze is coming up in just a few weeks. Red Hat developer Jakub Jelinek wrote in the latest status report, "Trunk which will eventually become GCC 7 is still in Stage 1 but its end is near and we are planning to transition into Stage 3 starting Nov 13th end of day time zone of your choice. This means it is time to get things you want to have in GCC 7 finalized and reviewed. As usual there may be exceptions to late reviewed features but don't count on that. Likewise target specific features can sneak in during Stage 3 if maintainers ok them."
  • GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') released [stable]
    GNU Parallel 20161022 ('Matthew') [stable] has been released. It is available for download at: No new functionality was introduced so this is a good candidate for a stable release.
  • GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset released
    GNU Health 3.0.4 patchset has been released !
  • guile-ncurses 2.0 released
    I am pleased to announce the release of guile-ncurses 2.0 guile-ncurses is a library for the creation of text user interfaces in the GNU Guile dialect of the Scheme programming language. It is a wrapper to the ncurses TUI library. It contains some basic text display and keyboard and mouse input functionality, as well as a menu widget and a form widget. It also has lower level terminfo and termios functionality.
  • Unifont 9.0.03 Released
    Unifont 9.0.03 is released. The main changes are the addition of the Pikto and Tonal ConScript Unicode Registry scripts.
  • PATHspider 1.0.0 released!
    In today’s Internet we see an increasing deployment of middleboxes. While middleboxes provide in-network functionality that is necessary to keep networks manageable and economically viable, any packet mangling — whether essential for the needed functionality or accidental as an unwanted side effect — makes it more and more difficult to deploy new protocols or extensions of existing protocols. For the evolution of the protocol stack, it is important to know which network impairments exist and potentially need to be worked around. While classical network measurement tools are often focused on absolute performance values, PATHspider performs A/B testing between two different protocols or different protocol extensions to perform controlled experiments of protocol-dependent connectivity problems as well as differential treatment.
  • The Domain Name System

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE

  • Happy 20th birthday, KDE!
    KDE turned twenty recently, which seems significant in a world that seems to change so fast. Yet somehow we stay relevant, and excited to continue to build a better future. Lydia asked recently on the KDE-Community list what we were most proud of.
  • SETI – Week of Information Technology
  • KDevelop for Windows available on Chocolatey now
    Which is already great in itself! But now it's also possible to install it via the super popular Windows package manager for Windows, Chocolatey.
  • colord-kde 0.5.0 released!
    Last official stable release was done more than 3 years ago, it was based on Qt/KDE 4 tech, after that a few fixes got in what would be 0.4.0 but as I needed to change my priorities it was never released. Thanks to Lukáš Tinkl it was ported to KF5, on his port he increased the version number to 0.5.0, still without a proper release distros rely on a git checkout.
  • Call for attendees Lakademy 2017
    As many of you know, since 2012 we organize the Lakademy, a sort of Latin American Akademy. The event brings together KDE Latin American contributors in hacking sessions to work on their projects, promo meetings to think KDE dissemination strategies in the region and other activities.
  • Plasma 5 Desktop on FreeBSD Branding
    The FreeBSD packages of KDE software — the KDE 4 desktop, and soon KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 5 Desktop and KDE Applications — have traditionally been shipped pretty much as delivered from the upstream source. We compile, we package, and there is very little customization we do as a “distro”. The KDE 4 packages came with a default wallpaper that was a smidgen different from the one shipped with several Linux distro’s. I think Ivan Cukic did that artwork originally. For Plasma 5 Desktop, we also wanted to do a tiny bit of branding — just the default wallpaper for new users, mind.
  • A bit on Tooling
    So on the weekend I also worked on updating Qt 5.6.1 to Qt 5.6.2 on FreeBSD, which involves using new and scary tools as well. Power tools, they can be really useful, or they can take off a finger if you’re not careful. In this case it was Phabricator, which is also used in KDE — but not everywhere in KDE. For FreeBSD, the tool is used to review updates to ports (the packaging instructions), so I did an update of Qt from 5.6.1 to 5.6.2 and we handled the review through FreeBSD’s Phab. The ports infrastructure is stored in SVN, so the review is relatively straightforward: update the ports-tree checkout, apply your changes, use arc to create or update a review request. I was amazed by how painless it was — somehow I’d been frightened. Using the tool once, properly, makes a big difference in self-confidence.
  • Krita 3.1 second beta.
    The Krita 3.1 beta come with a full features and fixes. The linux version to download your krita-3.0.91-x86_64.appimage.
  • Second Beta for Krita 3.1 Available
    We’re still fixing bugs like madmen… And working on some cool new features as well, but that’s for a later release. In any case, here is the second Krita 3.1 beta! Yes, you’re reading that correctly. Originally, we had planned to use 3.0.2 as the version for this release, but there is so much news in it that it merits a bigger version bump.


  • Consequences of the HACK CAMP 2016 FEDORA + GNOME
    I used to do install parties in order to promote the use of FEDORA and GNOME project since five years ago. As you can see more details in the Release Party FEDORA 17 for Fedora, and Linux Camp 2012, GNOME PERU 2013, GNOME PERU 2014...
  • GNOME Shell Making It Easy To Launch Apps/Games For Optimus / Dual GPU Systems
    With the GNOME 3.24 desktop that's currently in development the latest GNOME Shell code has support for easily letting the user launch an app on a dedicated GPU when applicable for handling NVIDIA Optimus use-cases of having integrated and discrete GPU laptops. When a dual-GPU system is detected, a menu item will be added to opt for "Launch using Dedicated Graphics Card", per this commit. The GNOME Shell change for supporting discrete GPUs was made and when the user opts to launch on the dedicated GPU, the DRI_PRIME=1 environment variable will automatically be set for that new program/game.