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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Help people without broadband around the world

Filed under
Linux

dedoimedo.com: He raised a very valid point: Linux was easy and multimedia on Linux was easy - but only for people with solid Internet connection. Let's help people without broadband enjoy Linux.

Also: Free Linux DVDs for schools and unis

Linux - a changed environment

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: The future of Linux can be predicted based on the fact that it stands to provide its users the features they looking for, be it Wi-Fi compatibility, games, intuitive UI, et al.

Please forget to FLOSS

Filed under
OSS

esr.ibiblio.org: In email to a third party, copied to me, Linux activist and long-time friend Rick Moen comments on the acronym FLOSS (usually explanded “Free, Libré, and Open Source”.

Fedora Test Day - Nouveau - Experience

Filed under
Linux

loupgaroublond.blogspot: Today i participated for the first time in a Fedora Test Day. Conveniently i had a few hours free today, so i decided to devote some time to making sure my nVidia chip will work well in the next Fedora release. The short answer, it does.

PCLinuxOS is GREAT

Filed under
PCLOS

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Pimp your startup sequence with Bootchart

  • Mandriva will be present at the Linux 2009 Solutions Exhibition
  • Canonical To Not Enable UXA, Too Problematic
  • Two Great Kid-Friendly Linux Projects
  • Michelle Hall On Qimo - Linux For Kids
  • Ubuntu and my work
  • Thoughts about gentoo packages
  • Things I wrote down during OSBC
  • March in the archive: a view from the Ubuntu Server team
  • Takeaways and Study Materials from the OSBC
  • Suse Linux powers SA tax collection
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Beta Screenshot Tour
  • Who really keeps open source out of business?
  • Introducing KDE 4 Notification Icons
  • Microsoft deeds are the problem
  • Sharing, Contributing... and Caching
  • Learning Geography with KGeography on Ubuntu Linux
  • Brian Aker: What Would an IBM Buyout of Sun Mean for MySQL?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Diagnose and fix network problems yourself

  • Writing GNOME Docs, Part II
  • How to Install GCC (c/c++) Compiler in Ubuntu Linux
  • Echo Debugging
  • Mailman with lighttpd and Postfix on Gentoo
  • Chainloading with Grub
  • Multi touch for any, all synaptics touchpad
  • Install the Fedora 10 Desktop Theme in Ubuntu
  • How to sendemail from the command line
  • VirtualBox and Running a Virtual Ubuntu Image within an Ubuntu Host
  • Convert pdf to jpg
  • Find files the easy way

Linux is about choice (pt 1)

Filed under
Software

nthrbldyblg.blogspot: I argue that Linux is about choice. Why then, do applications (or their developers) decide to take away that choice?

Moonlight plans video-patent police beater for Linux

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: The open-source version of Microsoft's Silverlight is adopting hardware-based decoding for video, a move that will boost multimedia on Linux devices.

First LibrePlanet was a Resounding Success

Filed under
OSS

fsf.org/blogs: The LibrePlanet event was a huge success, and a great launch for our community activities at libreplanet.org. LibrePlanet featured a jam-packed schedule including a full day of speakers on Saturday and an Open Space Conference on Sunday.

Open-source firms urged to go on legal offensive

Filed under
OSS

linuxworld.com (IDG): Open-source software companies are missing out on a relatively inexpensive way to fight concerns about patent liability, according to an attorney who spoke at an open-source conference in San Francisco this week.

Hey, your distro sucks!

Filed under
Linux

larrythefreesoftwareguy.wordpress: I’m sitting in a room at HeliOS Solutions with computers running primarly Fedora. However, there are also boxes (going clockwise from where I’m sitting) running OpenSUSE, AntiX Mepis (it’s old), Debian, Xubuntu and Ubuntu.

First Impressions: Igelle PC/Desktop 0.6.0

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: AFTER more than a decade of using Linux, it's not often that a Linux distribution appears on Distrowatch and I go: Who? What? But that's exactly what happened.

First Look at Ubuntu 9.04 "Jaunty Jackalope" Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

lifehacker.com: The name's ridiculous, but "Jaunty Jackalope," the next release of the popular Linux distribution Ubuntu, is seriously focused on the user experience. Dig what's new and improved in the beta of Ubuntu 9.04, due out today.

Securing your organisation with open source

Filed under
OSS

tectonic.co.za: While backup and recovery solutions are considered paramount in most organisations, they are possibly one of the most overlooked procedures in company security policies, mainly because they seem to try to achieve the opposite.

Linux Chromium progresses on tabs

Filed under
Software

stefanoforenza.com: It’s nice to see work is in progress and the last system updates brings tab functionality to the browser. Being work in progress, tabs don’t work in the way you expect them (you can’t switch between them, you can’t close them, etc), but they appear. So let’s take a look !

10 ways Microsoft could help Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Stop the presses: Jack Wallen supports an alliance between Microsoft and Linux. Find out why he believes both camps could work together for the benefit of all concerned.

Kernel developers squabble over Ext3 and Ext4

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: A number of senior kernel developers, including Linus Torvalds, Ted Ts'o, Alan Cox and Ingo Molnar, have been squabbling over the sense or otherwise of journaling and delayed allocation in Ext3 and Ext4.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.