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Monday, 22 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story [GNU IceCat] 31.1.1 released Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:00pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 6:28pm
Story Still running 32 bit Ubuntu? Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 4:00pm
Story NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 Offers Great Linux Performance Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 3:56pm
Story GTK+ Gains Experimental Overlay Scrollbars Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 3:31pm
Story 3 Alternatives to the Adobe PDF Reader on Linux Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 3:02pm
Story How OpenStack powers the research at CERN Roy Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 12:05pm
Story WE’RE HOSTING AN OPENDAYLIGHT HACKFEST IN JAPAN! Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 9:05am
Story Debian Project mourns the loss of Peter Miller Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:52am
Story A Seat at the Big Kids’ Table at Ohio LinuxFest Rianne Schestowitz 21/10/2014 - 8:36am

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 37

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #37 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: Hack Week III Judging, Novell OpenPR Blog: Zonker Blogs, and Board election.

Reject Closed Source Mathematical and Scientific Programs

Filed under
OSS

kdubois.net: The modern scientific and mathematical community relies heavily on mathematical software for research and computations of pretty much everything. Unfortunately, from what I’ve seen, most of these tools seem to be closed source.

New startups explore new niches for open source

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Over the weekend two new open-source startups caught my eye (and my inbox): OrecX and Transverse. The first is notable for its demonstration that open source is ready for niche applications. The second? Well, the second is notable because after reading through its website I still have no idea what it does.

Playing Windows Games on Linux: What are your options

Filed under
Gaming

blogs.howtogeek.com: If you're a gamer or a recent linux switcher you probably think you can't play Windows games on your linux box - or that they will run very slow and crash because they are emulating the Windows DirectX API. That's not the case anymore.

Mombuntu - Ubuntu For Your Mom

Filed under
Ubuntu

helpforlinux.blogspot: You might be wondering why I am suggesting an Linux distro for your mom. Well Linux is no longer the stronghold of geeks. Distros like Ubuntu have made using Linux as simple as using Windows.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Resetting the root password on Ubuntu Linux

  • Firefox 3: Getting rid of the drop-downs
  • /etc/grub.conf explained
  • Photo KDE Tutorial 1-4: Brightness/Contrast/Gamma + Hue/Saturation/Lightness
  • Puppet - Centralised configuration management for networks
  • HOW TO: Remove the annoying KDE error when unmounting usb device
  • Ksensors: An Application To Monitor Your Computer’s Temperature

Dell Mini 9....

Filed under
Just talk

So, September the 4th saw the launch of the new Dell Mini 9 PC, which I placed and order on Dells website, paid my money, and even had a dell official call me at work, to check m Work address was where i wanted the device delivered to.. All very good service, and its at this point, over here in the UK, I see problems occuing.

10 Fine-looking Icon Sets for KDE Desktop

Filed under
KDE

junauza.com: Since plenty of you love our collection of icon sets for Ubuntu/GNOME Desktop, I'll be sharing to you all yet another set of my favorite desktop icons. This time, I'll try to cheer up some KDE.

2000 Caldera-Microsoft Settlement Surfaces in Novell v. Microsoft Antitrust Lawsuit

Filed under
Legal

groklaw.net: The Novell/Canopy/Caldera/DR DOS story continues, and Novell and Microsoft are in the middle of it all, battling in discovery in the Novell v. Microsoft antitrust litigation -- that is the litigation over WordPerfect currently before the US District Court in Maryland in pretrial discovery.

openSUSE Board Election Comments

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: The first openSUSE board has been appointed a year ago and now the elections are starting. We have formed an election committee that is organising it.

Ubuntu 8.10 Alpha 5 Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: Delayed one day, the fifth alpha version of the upcoming Ubuntu 8.10 (codename Intrepid Ibex), which is scheduled for release in late October this year, was made available a few hours ago and, as usual, we intend to keep you up-to-date with the latest changes.

X.Org 7.4 Release Planned For Sep 10

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Mesa 7.1 was released near the end of August and X Server 1.5.0 was released just earlier this week, but the release of X.Org 7.4 consisting of all the latest X packages has yet to make it out the door.

Rising costs prompt Naukri to go for Linux

Filed under
Linux

sify.com: Red Hat is the recognised brand and it is the flavour of Linux that has worked well for us. We have been able to roll out services and products in line with our innovation credo.

Ubuntu 8.10 gets closer

Filed under
Ubuntu

zdnet.com.au: The Ubuntu project has made available an advance testing version of its popular Linux distribution, with the full 8.10, 'Intrepid Ibex' release scheduled to be released in October.

Firefox 3 Alpha 2 reviewed

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: Mozilla has released the second alpha of Shiretoko, the development codename of Firefox 3.1. Alpha 2 brings a handful of improvements and new features that help advance the web to a more open, standards based stage, while tweaking the user experience.

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reviews.cnet.com: Dell's entry into the Netbook market means its time to take these low-cost, low-power PCs seriously. The Inspiron Mini 9 is an excellent example of the form, if not radically different from the competition.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How to create an ubuntu 8.04.1 boot floppy

  • Howto select Per-user Editor in Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid)
  • Use LatencyTOP to pinpoint latency
  • Ubuntu Disk Quotas
  • Naming Conventions for Hard Disks and Partitions
  • Spin openSUSE Live CD or USB stick image “easily”
  • XFCE, SLiM, PAM, and Jack
  • What Windows Or New Users Need To Know About Ubuntu
  • Building Chrome with Debian (or getting out the polishing cloth at least)
  • Controlling Internet access with SafeSquid
  • Gnac - A Simple Program to Convert Audio Files
  • Get involved: Gentoo Bugday coming up Saturday
  • Can Dell and Vodafone play leapfrog with Linux?
  • Yahoo.com promoting Firefox 3
  • The Linux laptop goes to school
  • End of an era: Dell may dump its factories
  • Has the head of MySQL left Sun?
  • Mandriva Linux 2009 RC1 - Camelopard Screenshots
  • Linux Caffe, 326 Harbord Street
  • Howdy World! A Funny Unix/Linux Programming Joke

Closing X Developer Summit 2008 Notes

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Aside from the short X Server 1.6 release plans and clarifying UXA+EXA, there are a few other notes to share from this afternoon's X.Org/Intel talk.

KVM vs. Xen vs. VMware. Is it a Hypervisor War?

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: For years, Xen and VMware have been the virtualization technologies of choice for open source operating systems vendors. With Red Hat's acquisition of Qumranet yesterday and its competing Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) open source hypervisor the winds of change may be blowing, or not.

Announcing the Ubuntu Manpage Repository

Filed under
Ubuntu

dustinkirkland.wordpress: I love the Ubuntu Wiki, and I think the Official Ubuntu Documentation is great! These are two important reasons why Ubuntu has been such a successful Linux distribution. But at the end of the day, I’m a terminal-and-manpage kind of a guy.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Firefox 58.0, Paying it forward, Firefox Nightly, Lantea Maps

  • Firefox 58.0 “Quantum” Arrives With Faster Page Load Speeds And Code Compilation
    In November 2017, Mozilla launched its Firefox 57 web browser that was also called Firefox Quantum. It was hailed as a strong competitor to powerful Chrome web browser and we conducted a comparison of both browsers to give you a better idea. But, the story doesn’t end here; Mozilla is continuing to improve its work to deliver better performance with each release.
  • Paying it forward at Global Diversity CFP Day
    A CFP is a “Call for Papers” or “Call for Proposals” – many technical and academic conferences discover and vet speakers and their talk topics through an open, deadline-driven, online proposal submission process. This CFP process provides a chance for anyone to pitch a talk and pitch themselves as the presenter. Submitting a CFP, and having your proposal accepted, is one great way to get a foot in the door if you’re just getting started as a new speaker. And, for some developers, public speaking can be the door to many types of opportunity.
  • Firefox Nightly
    Creating a Gnome Dock launcher and a terminal command for Firefox Nightly About 18 months ago, Wil Clouser wrote a blog post on the very blog titled Getting Firefox Nightly to stick to Ubuntu’s Unity Dock. Fast forward to 2018, Ubuntu announced last year that it is giving up on their Unity desktop and will use Gnome Shell instead. Indeed, the last Ubuntu 17.10 release uses Gnome Shell by default. That means that the article above is slightly outdated now as its .desktop file was targeting the Unity environment which had its own quirks.
  • Lantea Maps Updates to Track Saving and Drawing
    After my last post on Lantea Maps (my web app to record GPS tracks), I started working on some improvements to its code. First, I created a new backend for storing GPS tracks on my servers and integrated it into the web app. You need to log in via my own OAuth2 server, and then you can upload tracks fairly seamlessly and nicely. The UI for uploading is now also fully integrated into the track "drawer" which should make uploading tracks a smoother experience than previously. And as a helpful feature for people who use Lantea Maps on multiple devices, a device name can be configured via the settings "drawer".

Red Hat and Fedora

Perl Advocacy

  • My DeLorean runs Perl
    My signature hobby project these days is a computerized instrument cluster for my car, which happens to be a DeLorean. But, whenever I show it to someone, I usually have to give them a while to marvel at the car before they even notice that there's a computer screen in the dashboard. There's a similar problem when I start describing the software; programmers immediately get hung up on "Why Perl???" when they learn that the real-time OpenGL rendering of instrument data is all coded in Perl. So, any discussion of my project usually starts with the history of the DeLorean or a discussion of the merits of Perl vs. other, more-likely tools.
  • An overview of the Perl 5 engine
    As I described in "My DeLorean runs Perl," switching to Perl has vastly improved my development speed and possibilities. Here I'll dive deeper into the design of Perl 5 to discuss aspects important to systems programming.

FOSS Linux App Development In Decline, Canonical Promotes Snap Using Proprietary Software

  • Is Native Linux App Development In Decline?
    A blog like mine thrives, in part, on there being a steady supply of good quality native Linux apps to write about. We do news too of course, and tutorials, how tos, lists, eye candy, and even the odd opinion piece (like this post). But I know you like reading about new and updated Linux apps, and, to be fair, I like writing about them. And yet… Where have all the Linux apps gone? Bear with me as what follows is more of a ramble than a coherent essay. For background, I’m writing this on day four of an enthusiasm drought.
  • Slack launches on Linux
  • Slack gets the Linux treatment: New snap available for Mint, Ubuntu, Debian, and more
    Slack is now available as a snap, which means Linux users can take advantage of the workplace collaboration platform, Canonical announced last week. Slack has recently debuted a number of features that make it more appealing to businesses, including Shared Channels and Private Shared Channels, which allow employees from different companies to work together on projects in private if they so choose. With more than 9 million weekly active users, Slack has gained a lot of traction in the enterprise, as noted by our sister site ZDNet. Back in October 2017, Linux overtook MacOS for the first time in terms of global operating system market share—which means the move opens up even more users to the Slack platform.
  • Canonical slaps Slack snap onto stack
    As the ‘company behind’ Ubuntu, Canonical has brought forward the first iteration of Slack as a snap on its software platform. Slack is a cloud-based set of proprietary team collaboration tools and services that go some way beyond core ‘messaging’ functionality into areas including project management.