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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 25 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 5:33am
Story Browser Wars: Usage stats srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 4:27am
Story Introducing Linvo GNU/Linux srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 4:25am
Story Manage Your Finances (Simply) in Linux with wxBanker srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 4:23am
Story Up Close & Personal with Red Hat CEO James Whitehurst srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 1:39am
Story The Free Game Lag srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 1:36am
Story OpenOffice: Always the Bridesmaid, Never the Bride srlinuxx 16/07/2011 - 1:33am
Story PCLinuxOS 2011.6 KDE review srlinuxx 15/07/2011 - 11:07pm
Story Pardus 2011.1: Turkish Delight srlinuxx 15/07/2011 - 10:44pm
Story The Dark Side of Distrohopping srlinuxx 15/07/2011 - 10:20pm

One Week With KDE : My Challenge

Filed under
KDE

In response to all this recent nonsense about gnome vs KDE vs Linus vs everyone else that has jumped on this bandwagon I thought I would do the responsible thing and put the two to the test. I will use KDE for one full week and post my thoughts at the end of that time.

Also: The Switch To KDE : Day 1

Migrating to Novell's SUSE Linux: Lessons learned in a successful project

Filed under
SUSE

Interoperability poses problems for most IT managers during migrations to or from Linux. Obstacles are presented in moving from the old and new environment and old and new versions of existing products. Both of these challenges were met by Metropolitan Bank Group during a migration to Novell SUSE, and this tip describes and offers commentary on that project.

Virtualization: Linux's killer app

Filed under
Software

The proliferation of virtualization options gives Linux an edge over Windows. I came away from InfoWorld's Virtualization Executive Forum this week with two conclusions. First, server virtualization is definitely a big deal. And, second, nowhere is virtualization hotter than in the Linux market.

UK open source policy institute to open next week

Filed under
OSS

A national centre to promote the development of open source software will be officially launched next week. The National Open Centre (NOC) holds its official launch at the Houses of Parliament on 26 February.

openSUSE 10.3 alpha 1 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

It's that time again. Yes, it's the beginning of the next openSUSE developmental cycle. It began with the release of 10.3 alpha 1 last Thursday. Reports have already been circulating with some of the new changes.

SCALE 5x Impressions

Filed under
Linux

SCALE is the Southern California Linux Expo and is turning out to be one of the premier Linux meetings of the year. This year attendance was about 1200 with 90 booths. While other conferences are larger, this one is nice because you actually get to spend quality time talking to people and finding out things.

Dolphin - New File Manager for KDE 4

Filed under
KDE

In the transition from KDE 3 to KDE 4 a new file manager, dolphin, was often discussed and now officially moved to the base part of KDE. dolphin will become the default file manager (kicker buttons and file:/ links bring it up); or a more file-manager-oriented GUI than in kde3.

MicroReview: openSuSe….Name is enuf!!!

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

With the latest release standing @ 10.2, openSuSe has made its Linux distribution pretty impressive. i have tried till date some 4 releases of SuSe and this has been the best of them all.

KDE Quickies: Dev Wiki, Sonnet, Jambi, Scientific Analysis and CSS Compliance

Filed under
KDE

Vote for the name of the new KDE developer and sysadmin wiki. *** Nathan Sanders reveals that KDE 4's Sonnet will turbocharge language processing at Linux.com. *** CSS3.info blogs that Konqueror is the most compliant browser for CSS.

Open source integration remains 'elusive'

Filed under
OSS

Analyst firm Gartner said that open source integration remains an "elusive goal" despite the ongoing efforts of groups including the OSA, the Open Source Development Lab, the Apache Software Foundation and the Eclipse Foundation.

No halo over open source

Filed under
OSS

Has open source lost its halo, as Eric Lai's Computerworld article suggests? Is open-source still a grassroots social movement made up of idealistic underdogs trying to revolutionize an amoral industry?

Or is that a straw-man argument cooked up for a slow news day?

beryl: usability, parts 4 & 5

Filed under
HowTos

One problem I often find with switchers (both in beryl and in other window managers) is that they either only give an icon (for conventional switchers) or three thumbnails. While you can switch through those three thumbnails, if you've got 10 or 15 windows open, it becomes quite unweildy to flick through them. Alternatively there is the new wheel/rotation feature for the switcher.

2006 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Award Winners Announced

Filed under
Linux

The polls are closed, the data has been audited and the results are in. Here are the official results for the 2006 LinuxQuestions.org Members Choice Awards:

Distribution of the Year -

Ascii Art Video and Images

Filed under
HowTos

You can easily watch videos and view images in ascii. If you are ascii art fans, you will be amazed what libaa and libcaca capable of. libaa is a portable ascii art GFX library, where libcaca as well, is another ascii art library but it have better support such as unicode, 2048 colors etc.

Fedora and Ubuntu to incorporate Kernel-based virtualization

Filed under
Linux

The latest release of the Linux kernel, 2.6.20, includes integrated virtualization capabilities with the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM). The KVM kernel module leverages x86 virtualization extensions included in various Intel and AMD processors. Several distributions, including Ubuntu and Fedora, are already preparing to include the KVM kernel module in upcoming releases.

Reuters news organization banned from reporting!

Filed under
Linux

The headline of this post is tongue-in-cheek (but of course you knew that already, right?). Reuters, to the best of my knowledge, has not been banned from reporting. Although based on some of their recent work, they should be.

New Microsoft deal in the works with Red Hat? Don’t bet on it

Filed under
Linux

There's a story making the rounds today that Microsoft is poised to sign a new technology partnership with Red Hat that could be as sweeping as the one it signed with Novell. There's only one problem with the report: Red Hat is denying it.

10 Linux commands you've never used

Filed under
HowTos

It takes years maybe decades to master the commands available to you at the Linux shell prompt. Here are 10 that you will have never heard of or used. They are in no particular order. My favorite is mkfifo.

Make Sure Your Machine Is On The Correct Time With ntpdate

Filed under
HowTos

I have been doing a lot of ssh connections between my machines lately and noticed that the times were different between each. I had assumed that each would be fairly close but one was even five minutes off. Well, that was an easy fix using ntpdate.

Grab Windows Internet Radio Streams in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Ah, sadly, you can’t use streamripper. Sad Most radios use Windows streams, so we’ll have to use Mplayer to record it.

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More in Tux Machines

Windows, Mac or Linux... Which operating system best suits your business?

Linux is a free alternative. Apart from the zero-cost factor, it's still less prone to viruses than Windows. Most Linux machines start out as Windows computers that are reformatted. Linux is also adaptable -- Linux is an OS kernel, not a full system, but is the heart of software distributions such as Ubuntu or Fedora. As for cons, Linux is more complex to learn and use. There are also far fewer programs written for Linux systems. Of course, someone with an advanced online computer science master’s degree will help you make the most of a Linux system by supplying the skills needed to innovate and implement custom solutions for your business environment. Read more

LinuxCon, Linux at 25, and Linux Development

5 Ways to Solve the Open Source Industry's Biggest Problems

Over the last decade, open source software and its audience of end users have greatly matured. Once only used by a small subset of tech-savvy early adopters, the convenience, effectiveness and cost savings of open source solutions are now driving enterprise IT to explore more ways to take advantage of the power of open source in their daily business operations. In today's economy, enterprise IT has less to gain from developing and licensing software and more to gain from actively working with existing open source technology. However, the march toward open source still faces major obstacles before it becomes mainstream. In this slideshow, Travis Oliphant, CEO and founder of Continuum Analytics, outlines five challenges preventing enterprise IT from shifting to open source and tips for tackling them to keep the future of open source heading in the right direction. The road may be winding, but it will eventually lead companies to open source to help them innovate and as the way of the future. Read more Also: Latest attacks on privacy...

Security News

  • Jay Beale: Linux Security and Remembering Bastille Linux
    Security expert and co-creator of the Linux-hardening (and now Unix-hardening) project Bastille Linux. That’s Jay Beale. He’s been working with Linux, and specifically on security, since the late 1980s. The greatest threat to Linux these days? According to Beale, the thing you really need to watch out for is your Android phone, which your handset manufacturer and wireless carrier may or may not be good about updating with the latest security patches. Even worse? Applications you get outside of the controlled Google Play and Amazon environments, where who-knows-what malware may lurk. On your regular desktop or laptop Linux installation, Beale says the best security precaution you can take is encrypting your hard drive — which isn’t at all hard to do. He and I also talked a bit, toward the end, about how “the Linux community” was so tiny, once upon a time, that it wasn’t hard to know most of its major players. He also has some words of encouragement for those of you who are new to Linux and possibly a bit confused now and then. We were all new and confused once upon a time, and got less confused as we learned. Guess what? You can learn, too, and you never know where that knowledge can take you.
  • Automotive security: How safe is a next-generation car?
    The vehicles we drive are becoming increasingly connected through a variety of technologies. Features such as keyless entry and self-diagnostics are becoming commonplace. Unfortunately, they can also introduce IT security issues.
  • Let's Encrypt: Every Server on the Internet Should Have a Certificate
    The web is not secure. As of August 2016, only 45.5 percent of Firefox page loads are HTTPS, according to Josh Aas, co-founder and executive director of Internet Security Research Group. This number should be 100 percent, he said in his talk called “Let’s Encrypt: A Free, Automated, and Open Certificate Authority” at LinuxCon North America. Why is HTTPS so important? Because without security, users are not in control of their data and unencrypted traffic can be modified. The web is wonderfully complex and, Aas said, it’s a fool’s errand to try to protect this certain thing or that. Instead, we need to protect everything. That’s why, in the summer of 2012, Aas and his friend and co-worker Eric Rescorla decided to address the problem and began working on what would become the Let’s Encrypt project.
  • OpenSSL 1.1 Released With Many Changes
    OpenSSL 1.1.0 was released today as a major update to this free software cryptography and SSL/TLS toolkit. In addition to OpenSSL 1.1 rolling out a new build system and new security levels and support for pipelining and a new threading API, security additions to OpenSSL 1.1 include adding the AFALG engine, support for ChaChao20 in libcrypto/libssl, scrypto algorithm support, and support for X25519, among many other additions.
  • Is Windows ​10’s ‘Hidden Administrator Account’ a security risk? [Ed: Damage control from Microsoft Jack (Jack Schofield) because Microsoft Windows is vulnerable by design]