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Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Firefox and Linux redux (and OpenBSD)

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Part of the behind-the-scenes stuff that people don’t see is the coordination that goes on as part of our trademark approval process. Red Hat and Novell have been working closely with us for quite some time, but other distros have not been as involved. I was very fortunate to work with Alexander Sack of Ubuntu and Martynas Venckus of OpenBSD to get their distros in the same loop.

What’s new in SELinux for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5?

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Dan Walsh will be presenting an overview of “What’s new with SELinux in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5″ at the Red Hat Summit on Wednesday May 9th at 3:00 PM in the “What’s New” Track. This article presents some of the material from that talk, and was written with frequent magazine contributor Len DiMaggio.

Software security? Do I have to?

Rosie's blog builders say it's all about community

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EchoDitto helps its clients create online communities. It believes in open source software and relies heavily on the Drupal content management system both internally and for its customers. EchoDitto CTO and co-founder Justin Pinder says it's the community that makes open source invaluable.

KDE Screen captures with KSnapshot

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The KDE desktop environment for Linux has a handy graphics tool for capturing screenshots called KSnapshot. This utility lets you make screenshots in any of 4 different capture modes and allows you to save the results as JPEG, PNG or XPM files.

Desktop Linux For All?

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Hallelujah! Linux on the desktop has finally arrived!

Or has it been here all along?

This week's mammothly hyped news that Dell would be shipping PCs with Ubuntu Linux pre-loaded has been hailed by some as a momentous occasion for the Linux desktop. One might be tempted to think that no hardware vendor has ever offered Linux before.

Ubuntu Founder: No Emulation Software for Dell Systems

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Dell will not include open-source software such as Wine, which lets users run Windows programs on Linux, with the PCs it plans to bundle with Ubuntu Linux, Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Ubuntu and its commercial sponsor Canonical, said May 3.

Six Six Sixty Four Bit

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Ubuntu Satanic Edition is now available for the amd64 architecture, so those of your with twice as many bits as anyone else can finally point your browsers to:

…and follow the standard installation procedure to join the rest of us in the underworld.

Don't be afraid, Linux isn't just for geeks

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It came out earlier this week that Dell will soon offer computers running Linux instead of Windows. Not all of its machines, obviously — the company wants to stay in business — but Linux will be an option on at least two desktops and one laptop models.

Linux: Debating Swap-Prefetch

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ngo Molnar reviewed Con Kolivas's swap-prefetching patches suggesting that they were ready for inclusion in the mainline kernel, "I've reviewed it once again and in the !CONFIG_SWAP_PREFETCH case it's a clear NOP, while in the CONFIG_SWAP_PREFETCH=y case all the feedback i've seen so far was positive. Time to have this upstream and time for a desktop-oriented distro to pick it up."

Mozilla CEO: Open source is no monster

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Open source is nothing to be afraid of, according to Mozilla's chief executive officer.

Mitchell Baker, speaking at CeBIT Australia 2007 in Sydney earlier this week, destroyed the perception that open-source vendors were just ad hoc organisations. Baker claimed Mozilla was not "Frankenstein", dispelling notions that code is haphazardly thrown together in open-source development.

Tories plan open door for open source

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A Tory strategy to make more use of open source software in the public sector is likely to tackle the culture of secrecy in government procurement, according to early details released to The Register.

Mugshot: Social networking open source style

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Now that we have open source beer, open source cars, and open source photography, a social networking service run by Red Hat and based around open source software comes as no surprise.

Debian Etch And Xen From The Debian Repository

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This guide provides step-by-step instructions on how to install Xen on an already working Debian Etch system. You can find all the software used here in the Etch repository, so no external files or compilation are needed.

Pidgin 2.0: A true polyglot

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Pidgin 2.0, the latest version of the popular open source instant messaging client formerly known as Gaim, is now available for download. After months of development and numerous beta releases, Pidgin 2.0 is finally ready.A significant improvement over the current 1.5.x series, Pidgin 2.0 includes several compelling features and usability enhancements.

The Top 15 most colorful, controversial Microsoft statements ever

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In the pantheon of controversial Microsoft comments CEO Steve Ballmer's quote this week about the Apple iPod: "There's no chance that the iPhone is going to get any significant market share. No chance. It's a $500 subsidized item," ranks right up there.

Apache at 56% - what is wrong?

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The newest Netcraft Web server survey shows again a shrinking of Apaches market share. It is now at 56%, followed by Microsoft with more then 30%.

Seven steps to Feisty Fawn bliss

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With the release of Ubuntu 7.04, aka Feisty Fawn, I naturally couldn't resist taking Kubuntu, my preferred Ubuntu version, for a quick spin on my trusty old Thinkpad testbed.

Here is a six-step process through which I speedily arrived at a highly usable, fully capable desktop Linux system. A comparison to my previous seven-distro Thinkpad exploit appears at the end.

Astronaut Wally Schirra dies

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One of the original seven Mercury astronauts, Walter Schirra Jr., has died of a heart attack at the age of 84.

Could Unix happen today?

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Almost 40 years ago, a relatively few number of folks working on a shoestring budget came up with the Unix operating system, which in hindsight, could be seen as a revolutionary technology. Could that happen today? Maybe not with operating systems, but perhaps in other fields of software, said Brian Kernighan, one of the original developers of the OS.

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More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu 16.10 review: Convergence is in a holding pattern; consistency’s here instead

There's plenty in Ubuntu 16.10 that makes it worth the upgrade, though nothing about Canonical's latest release is groundbreaking. This less experimental but worthwhile update continues to refine and bug-fix what at this point has become the fastest, stablest, least-likely-to-completely-change-between-point releases of the three major "modern" Linux desktops. Still, while the Unity 7.5 desktop offers stability and speed today, it's not long for this world. Ubuntu 16.10 is the seventh release since the fabled Unity 8 and its accompanying Mir display server were announced. Yet in Ubuntu 16.10, there's still no Unity 8 nor Mir. Read more

NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 OpenGL/Vulkan/OpenCL Linux Performance

Earlier this week NVIDIA began shipping the GeForce GTX 1050 graphics cards and our first review is of a Zotac GeForce GTX 1050 Mini. A GeForce GTX 1050 Ti Linux review is still coming up plus some other articles looking at performance-per-Watt and other interesting areas for these low-cost Pascal-based GPUs. Here are results of the latest NVIDIA Linux performance compared to the latest open-source AMD Linux driver with various Radeon GPUs. Read more

What you can learn from GitHub's top 10 open source projects

Open source dominates big data. So much so, in fact, that Cloudera co-founder Mike Olson has declared, "No dominant platform-level software infrastructure has emerged in the last ten years in closed-source, proprietary form." He's right, as the vast majority of our best big data infrastructure (Apache Hadoop, Apache Spark, MongoDB, etc.) is open source. Read more


  • Managing OpenStack with Open Source Tools
    Day 2 operations are still dominated by manual and custom individual scripts devised by system administrators. Automation is needed by enterprises. Based on the above analysis, Ansible is a leading open source project with a high number contributions and a diverse community of contributions. Thus Ansible is a well supported and popular open source tool to orchestrate and manage OpenStack.
  • Databricks Weaves Deep Learning into Cloud-Based Spark Platform
    Databricks, a company founded by the creators of the popular open-source Big Data processing engine Apache Spark, is a firm that we've been paying close attention to here at OStatic. We're fans of the company's online courses on Spark, and we recently caught up with Kavitha Mariappan, who is Vice President of Marketing at the company, for a guest post on open source tools and data science. Now, Databricks has announced the addition of deep learning support to its cloud-based Apache Spark platform. The company says this enhancement adds GPU support and integrates popular deep learning libraries to the Databricks' big data platform, extending its capabilities to enable the rapid development of deep learning models. "Data scientists looking to combine deep learning with big data -- whether it's recognizing handwriting, translating speech between languages, or distinguishing between malignant and benign tumors -- can now utilize Databricks for every stage of their workflow, from data wrangling to model tuning," the company reports, adding "Databricks is the first to integrate these diverse workloads in a fast, secure, and easy-to-use Apache Spark platform in the cloud."
  • OpenStack Building the Cloud for the Next 50 Years (and Beyond)
    Two OpenStack Foundation executives talk about what has gone wrong, what has gone right and what's next for the open-source cloud. BARCELONA, Spain—When OpenStack got started in 2010, it was a relatively small effort with only two companies involved. Over the last six years, that situation has changed dramatically with OpenStack now powering telecom, retail and scientific cloud computing platforms for some of the largest organizations in the world.
  • The Myth of the Root Cause: How Complex Web Systems Fail
    Complex systems are intrinsically hazardous systems. While most web systems fortunately don’t put our lives at risk, failures can have serious consequences. Thus, we put countermeasures in place — backup systems, monitoring, DDoS protection, playbooks, GameDay exercises, etc. These measures are intended to provide a series of overlapping protections. Most failure trajectories are successfully blocked by these defenses, or by the system operators themselves.
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    Software-defined networking has matured from a science experiment into deployable, enterprise-ready technology in the last several years, with vendors from Big Switch Networks and Pica8 to Hewlett Packard Enterprise and VMware offering services for different use cases. Still, Nemertes Research's 2016 Cloud and Data Center Benchmark survey found a little more than 9% of organizations now deploying SDN in production.