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Tuesday, 06 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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No Microsoft patent deal for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-watch: In a recent column, I speculated that Mark Shuttleworth, CEO of Canonical Ltd., the company behind Ubuntu, might make Ubuntu the next Linux distribution to make a deal with Microsoft. The matter has also been hotly spoken about in some of the Ubuntu mailing lists. Unfortunately, no one seems to have actually read my column.

Alternative GUIs: GoblinX

Filed under
Linux

GoblinX is a live Linux distribution based on Slackware 11, written by a Brazillian developer who goes by the pseudonym Grobsch. It comes with five different window managers/GUIs, and uses custom artwork for each of them that's quite unlike anything you've seen before.

New Google Linux Apps Coming Soon

Filed under
Google

phoronix: In addition to Chris DiBona's words about NVIDIA and ATI binary display drivers, Google had also made an interesting splash at the first-ever Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit (which they had kindly hosted at their Mountain View campus) during a presentation by the Google Linux Client Team. What was it?

A New Adventure! Windows Mobile and Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

pocketpcmag blogs: I've been aware of the existence of the Linux operating system for a long time, but I'd always assumed that it would be too complicated for me to learn and was a bit too geeky. Recently, however, I began hearing about a version of Linux called Ubuntu that was supposed to be pretty easy to use. Flash forward a few weeks and not only have I found that it is relatively easy to use, but it's already replaced Windows Vista as my main operating system of choice for day to day use!

Cleaning your OS in Kubuntu and GNOME

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine: So, you’ve now taken the successful plunge and finally let the Microsoft nightmares fade into expensive and unpleasant memories. GNU/Linux can supply a nice little GUI that will quickly take care of housekeeping, after you’ve been having fun adding and removing software applications.

USDA Keeps Up with the Flow

Filed under
Software

eWeek: The agency turns to NetBeans, other open-source tools to project the water supply.

Alienware m5550 Notebook Computer Review

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

CyberNet: I’ve been wanting to get into reviewing computer hardware, but I wasn’t quite sure where to start. Finally I decided on laptops, and while there are some great sites out there that review them, none of the reviewers use them for an extended period of time. Their reviews are typically based off of performance and first impressions, but what about other things that are important such as how long the battery lasts while watching a movie or how scratch-resistant the case is?

GtkBuilder has landed!

Filed under
OLPC

Johan Dahlin: Today, after more than 2 years and 120 comments I could finally close #172535, adding support for loading interfaces created by UI designers in Gtk+.

Also: The OLPC project and competition

No negotiations with Microsoft in progress

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mark Shuttleworth: There’s a rumour circulating that Ubuntu is in discussions with Microsoft aimed at an agreement along the lines they have concluded recently with Linspire, Xandros, Novell etc. For the record, let me state my position.

Starting an appliction on login with Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Pie Palace: My desktop is an Ubuntu install. I want my instant messaging client to start automagically when I login. It doesn't make sense to use /etc/init.d to start it, because I want the app to be run as my user, and I want it to start with my windowing session. How does one do this with Ubuntu?

OpenBSD: Free As In Air

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: "OpenBSD is free as in air," Theo de Raadt stated in a recent thread on the OpenBSD -misc mailing list. The discussion began with a note that the Open Sound System had recently been "open sourced" under the GPLv2 and CDDL leading Theo to comment.

Linux for the kids

Filed under
Linux

banksnetworking blog: There’s the old favorite saying, “Give a man a fish and he’ll eat for a day. Teach him to fish and he’ll eat for the rest of his life.” Let’s focus on a little teaching to fish for a minute.

A brief introduction to xen-tools

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: It is no secret that I'm a big fan of the open source Xen virtual machine hypervisor, and I've written several tools to make using it under Debian GNU/Linux more straightforward. Here we'll take a quick look at using xen-tools to easily create new Xen guest domains.

Quick Tip: Turn on/off Firefox Go Button

Filed under
HowTos

the how-to-geek: The "Go" button in Firefox is rarely used and takes up space on the screen, although not all that much. If you want, you can easily disable it to give your address bar more room.

KIO - the killer app for KDE

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: I am a KDE user, if you haven’t already guessed and today I thought I would share what really sells KDE for me and makes me use KDE as my desktop environment. The killer feature that keeps me with KDE is a technology called KIO.

Word Processor Review

Filed under
Software

donationcoder: Welcome to the DonationCoder comprehensive review of Modern Word Processors. In part one we look at the majors players; in part two we try out the second-tier contenders; part three examines the online word processors challenging the desktop heavy hitters.

Manhattan Project Scientist Dies

Filed under
Obits

AP via Physorg: Samuel Isaac Weissman, a professor and chemist who helped develop the first atomic bomb as part of the Manhattan Project, has died, his wife said Friday. He was 94.

Add Linux Repositories for Point-and-Click Updates

Filed under
HowTos

Maximum PC: Ubuntu isn't the only Linux distribution offering easy automatic updates. It just does the best job of making them accessible. But if you take a few moments to add third-party repositories to your existing Linux install, you can get the same access to software, codecs, and OS updates, even if they're not part of your OS's default configuration. Here's how.

Mozilla Rewriting A Lot Of Code For Upcoming Firefox V3

Filed under
Moz/FF

Information Week: Mozilla programmers are touching most of the software components to increase performance, make the code base more modular and deal with new security threats.

Also: Safari: Do we really need another Web browser?

Linux Community Looks Past Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

Information Week: At the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit, developers discussed the evolution of the operating system--and tried to shrug off the patent threat.

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More in Tux Machines

Open spec SBC dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

T-Firefly is Kickstartering the first hacker SBC with Rockchip’s Cortex-A72/-A53 RK3399. The Firefly-RK3399 has up to 4GB DDR3, M.2, and USB 3.0 Type-C. T-Firefly, which offers Linux- and Android-ready open source boards like the Firefly-RK3288 and sandwich-style Firefly-RK3288 Reload, both of which are based on the quad-core, Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288, has advanced to a more powerful Rockchip SoC for its new open spec Firefly-RK3399. The hexa-core Rockchip RK3399 features two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz. This appears to be the first RK3399 SBC and the first SBC to include Cortex-A72 cores. Read more

Leftovers: Software

  • Manuskript is a Promising Open-Source Scrivener Alternative
    Whether you plan to work on a book, a screenplay, or better structure your dissertation, you’ll probably see apps like Scrivener recommended. If you’re running Windows, macOS or even Android then you’re spoilt for choice, with various competing proprietary apps at varying price points readily available. On Linux the choices are somewhat limited.
  • Tor 0.2.9 Is Just Around the Corner As 0.2.8.10 Fixes Memory Leak in OpenSSL 1.1
    The past weekend brought us new stable and development builds of the Tor anonymity network project, versioned 0.2.8.10, as the most advanced version out there, and 0.2.9.6 RC (Release Candidate).
  • Pitivi 0.98 Linux Video Editor Adds Customizable Keyboard Shortcuts
    Version 0.98 of the GNOME-aligned GStreamer-powered Pitivi non-linear video editor was tagged today as the newest development milestone. The main feature addition of Pitivi 0.98 is now supporting customizable keyboard supports! Aside from finally supporting customizable keyboard shortcuts for this open-source video editor, a lot of warnings were fixed from GTK 3.22, and there has been a lot of other bug fixing. Bugs around Pitivi's timeline were primarily targeted by this release.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.8-Tana Officially Released
    Phoronix Test Suite 6.8.0 is now available as the latest version of our open-source, fully-automated, reproducible benchmarking software for Linux, BSD, Solaris, macOS, Windows, and other operating systems. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 is the latest stable release now of our GPL-licensed benchmarking software updated on its regular quarterly release cadence. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 development focused on a number of low-level improvements to particularly benefit Phoromatic and the Phodevi (Phoronix Device Interface) software/hardware library abstraction layer.
  • iPerf As Another Network Benchmark Is Now Available Via The Phoronix Test Suite
  • Chromium-Based Vivaldi 1.6 Browser Enters Development, Brings Tab Stack Renaming
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard informs us about the availability of a new snapshot for the cross-platform, Chromium-based Vivaldi web browser, which promises to let users name tab stacks. Vivaldi Snapshot 1.6.682.3 marks the beginning of the development of Vivaldi 1.6, the next major version of the popular web browser, and it looks like it has been rebased on Chromium 55.0.2883.64. Besides fixing a bunch of regressions, the new development release implements an option under Settings -> Tabs -> Tab Features -> Tab stacking -> Allow Tab Stack Renaming, which lets you rename or name tab stacks.

today's howtos