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Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 3:07pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 3:06pm
Story Makulu Linux 6.0 KDE: Guaranteed to make you smile Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 2:42pm
Story What's behind the success of free and open source healthcare? Roy Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 2:36pm
Story Peppermint Five Is a Very Light and Interesting OS Based on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 2:23pm
Story Jim Zemlin to Wall Street: Why open source will lead the way Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 2:15pm
Story Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst: No One Knows OpenStack Better Than Us Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 12:26pm
Story FFmpeg 2.2.4 Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 12:22pm
Story Clonezilla Live 2.2.3-23 Now Features Support for New Filesystems Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 12:14pm
Story Best Android Apps For Managing Your Taxes Rianne Schestowitz 24/06/2014 - 10:45am

The Best General Purpose Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

fourforces.wordpress: A distribution (also called distro) is a member of the Linux family of computer operating systems. They are built around the Linux kernel and consist of a large variety of software. Here’s a list of some of the best general purpose and most popular open and free distributions:

A Linux ThinkPad

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

c|net blogs: I was gladdened yesterday when techbargains.com reported a sale on a new Lenovo ThinkPad R61 running SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop. It's not everyday that you run into a major PC vendor selling machines pre-loaded with Linux (excluding servers).

Compiz Simple-ccsm enhancements

Filed under
Software

compiz-fusion.org: On openSUSE 11.0 users will not have to fiddle with any commandline, hack scripts or xorg.conf to enable Compiz. Thanks to Rodrigo’s work, simple-ccsm now has a switch to easily enable/disable Compiz.

Microsoft tries to limit Linux on cheap laptops

Filed under
Microsoft

idg.no: Microsoft is launching a program to promote the use of its Windows OS in ultra low-cost PCs. Microsoft plans to offer PC makers steep discounts on Windows XP Home Edition to encourage them to use that OS instead of Linux on ultra low-cost PCs (ULPCs).

Multi-protocol wireless mesh gateway runs Debian

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Zaragoza, Spain-based Libelium announced an x86-based multi-protocol mesh router with a Debian GNU/Linux-based OS and a user-extensible browser-based open source management interface.

Tweeting in Linux part II: Twitux v. Twhirl

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: We're always on the lookout for good desktop Twitter clients. Because while the microblogging service is kind of useful as a web-based tool for sharing your thoughts, desktop clients make Twitter feel more like an instant messaging platform that allows you to communicate with hundreds, even thousands of people at once.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • The State of Oracle Linux

  • Linux Product Insider: Trolltech's Qt 4.4
  • Open Source Doesn't Need Billionaires
  • All OSS Developers Are Equal, But Some OSS Developers Are More Equal Than Others
  • Recent distro mini review
  • The Emperor’s new code
  • How does OpenSolaris fare for Ed Tech?
  • Sick of JavaOne? - You will be
  • Microsoft tax evasion: Get gNewSense
  • WINE 1.0 Release Candidate Is Out
  • Microsoft's Suse Linux franchise

An honest look at Xen and a future with KVM

Filed under
Software

blog.codemonkey.ws: I think we can finally admit that we, the Linux community, made a very big mistake with Xen. Xen should have never been included in a Linux distribution. There, I’ve said it. We’ve all been thinking it, have whispered it in closed rooms, and have done our bests to avoid it.

Book Review: Practical Guide to Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Reviews

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Mainstream Linux distributions such as the ever-popular Ubuntu have the potential to contain thousands or tens of thousands of packages and have a wealth of supporting services activated on computer boot ups. Mark G. Sobell’s book A practical guide to Ubuntu Linux, published by Prentice Hall, describes the details of maintaining these complex structures on your own machine.

C++ GUI Programming with Qt4 - Book Review

Filed under
Reviews

linuxhelp.blogspot: Qt is a cross platform application development framework which is widely used for the development of GUI and non-GUI programs. Some of the most visible products which have been developed using Qt are KDE, Opera web browser, Google Earth, Skype and Photoshop Elements.

You Can Hack An OS But You Can't Hack People - part 2: The Computing World

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: Once upon a time, there were three computing republics. Apple, Unix, and Windows. They spread out to cover all of the land until the map of the world looked like this:

Looking for Mr. ISV

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: One thing's for sure; with all of this talk about "open source billionaires" out in the ether-web, clearly people have some high expectations of open source's profitability. Or low, depending on the point of view. Honestly, unlike every other technology pundit this week, I'm not looking too hard for the open source billionaires.

Senior Debian developer quits core teams

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: A senior Debian developer, Australian Anthony Towns, has left some core teams of the project and gone quiet in the last couple of weeks, according to project sources.

5 Excellent Ways to Waste Time Online

Filed under
Web

makeuseof.com: The greatest luxury of time is time itself. Thus it’s a deadly sin to simply waste it. So, in our quest to happiness, these are my TOP 5 in covering time gaps with more joy and less boredom:

Top 10 Linux Applications

Filed under
Software

50webs.org: Here's my top ten GUI (Graphical User Interface) applications for Linux, the ones I'm supposed to never live without.

Multi-Pointer X Going Mainline

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: In our article earlier this week looking at the status of X.Org 7.4, one of the features originally planned for integration in this X Server release was MPX, or Multi-Pointer X. It's been announced that MPX will finally be merged into the mainline X.Org tree later this month.

bzr, git, and hg performance on the Linux tree

Filed under
Linux

laserjock.wordpress: I just did a historical comparison of git and bzr performance using the Linux source tree. One of the comments I got was “what about Mercurial?” There are a lot of projects using Mercurial, Mozilla being probably the most notable one. So, here’s a comparison of bzr and hg.

other Ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Hardy Heron is 0 for 2

  • Exploring other OS options: Ubuntu is Boss!!
  • Ubuntu Open Week unites community and developers
  • Howto: Install Mac Fonts on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Linux 8.10
  • A Root Shell On Ubuntu : The Right Way

Review: Hardy Heron converts an Ubuntu skeptic

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: I have to disclose that I have never been a real fan of Ubuntu. I've tried it about every release and had more than my share of issues with it. Ubuntu 8.04 was released last month, and the first reviews mostly spoke of how nice this version was, so I downloaded the i386 version to test.

Also: Ubuntu 8.04: Not quite there, yet

File System and Boot Loader Corruption in Dual Boot Linux System

Filed under
Linux

americanchronicle.com: This is a very helpful and easy method for the users who want to run more than one operating system on the same PC or they want to use some kind of application that specially run on a particular operating system. But there are some situations where if any problem to the one operating system occurs, other operating system will also get affected.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.