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Saturday, 26 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Review: Slackware 12.2

Filed under
Slack

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: I’ve already reviewed some distros based off of Slackware such as Zenwalk and Slax. Along the way I’ve come to learn about some of the appeal of Slackware and why people would base distributions off of it. However, it does have a reputation as a very hard distro to install.

Firefox 3.1 delivery slips; developers question TraceMonkey progress

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Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Some Mozilla Corp. developers have recommended that the company consider yanking the new JavaScript engine, dubbed TraceMonkey, from Firefox 3.1 to get the browser back on track and out the door.

xrandr and the X Window System

Filed under
Software
HowTos

blog.hydrasystemsllc: For those of us who have traveled outside of the world of Microsoft Windows and into UNIX-like operating systems, we should already be somewhat familiar with the X Window System. Some of us even understand its full potential. Over the years, I have grown really fond of one specific command line utility and that is xrandr.

Debian, Ubuntu, Mint and More

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Linux

byzantineroads.info: One of the reasons Newcomers to Linux are scared off is the sheer number of choice. So Let’s take a look at one popular branch and see if we an figure some stuff out.

VL-Hot: A Non-polling Alternative To HAL

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Software

oreilly.com: In most current Linux distributions if you plug in a piece of removable media an icon pops up on the desktop and/or a file manager window opens. This is accomplished by the HAL. VL-Hot, developed for Vector Linux provides an alternative that doesn't require continuous hardware polling.

Booting With Mandriva's Speedboot

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MDV

phoronix.com: Being worked on as part of Mandriva's next Linux distribution update is a technology they are referring to as Speedboot. In essence, the user is logging into their Linux desktop even before the system is fully booted. We have some timed results of Mandriva's Speedboot along with videos showing the differences.

Input Redirection, MPX and NOMAD

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Software

smspillaz.wordpress: So considering that compiz++ is now master and my patches haven’t been maintained in a while, a lot of you might be wondering what is going on with input redirection and MPX.

Linux: A Complete Overview

Filed under
Linux

ocmodshop.com: This article will discuss the differences between the Linux and Windows operating softwares; we discuss some of the pros and cons of each system.

New notification work lands in Jaunty

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: Thanks to the concerted efforts of Martin Pitt, Sebastien Bacher and several others, notify-osd and several related components landed in Jaunty last week. Notify-OSD handles both application notifications and keyboard special keys like brightness and volume.

The Smell of Linux Spirit

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Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: New versions of Linux distributions are churned out at a remarkable pace. Not only are new distros popping up all the time, but updates to existing distros are always up and coming as well.

Five-O for PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxosuser.blogspot: I have a group of friends who visited me in campus, and Marvin S. Tan brought his elegant ASUS laptop with him. Whatever for? To install PCLinuxOS, of course.

CrunchEEE 8.10.02 Review

Filed under
Linux

linux-ninja.com: After buying my Asus EEE PC 1000HA, I initially installed Ubuntu Netbook Remix on it. After learning more about (#!) CrunchBang Linux and seeing that they had released an optimized version for the EEE PC called CrunchEEE. I’ve been using CrunchEEE on my EEE PC for the last week and decided to do a review.

some leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Governance best practices

  • I Switched to KDE 4
  • Linux, nComputing, And Overheated Classrooms
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2009.02.20
  • How to make your first billion--with free software
  • Spy shot: Is this the new Mac mini?
  • Video: Mark Shuttleworth - We are our own worst enemy - Interview (Part One)
  • Video: Mark Shuttleworth - We are our own worst enemy - Interview (Part Two)
  • Ubuntu names
  • Dabbling with Linux
  • Qt Jambi to be open source
  • Post 4.2 features - part 1 [Lancelot]
  • NetworkManager 0.7.1 coming soon
  • Ubuntu now has "Cloud Computing Inside"

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • A free, open-source Linux multimedia streamer

  • How to Join the Ubuntu Community
  • Creating an adhoc host with Ubuntu
  • Taming the Wild Eee PC: Replacing the Operating System, Part 1
  • The Detail Guide To Perform A Debian 5.0 Network Install
  • 10 iptables rules to help secure your Linux box
  • Aligning filesystems to an SSD’s erase block size
  • Use netstat to See Internet Connections
  • Using ntfs partitions from GNU/Linux
  • Make Firefox flag secure web pages in Ubuntu and Mint
  • Retheaming Ubuntu - Part 2
  • Building OpenJDK under Ubuntu

Connecting to Windows servers from GNU/Linux using pyNeighborhood

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HowTos

Need to connect to a Windows server from a computer running GNU/Linux? pyNeighborhood gives you an easy and graphical way to do just that.

Read the full tutorial at Freesoftware Magazine.

Does Open Source Need Better Evangelists?

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com/blog: Do commercial open source companies need better evangelists? There are some good reasons to believe that they do.

Washington Times releases open source projects

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OSS

washingtontimes.com/blog: The Washington Times has always focused on content. After careful review, we determined that the best way to have the top tools to produce and publish that content is to release the source code of our in-house tools and encourage collaboration.

Finally, We Have It All- Small, Fast, and Affordable

linuxtoday.com: Ever since I can remember travelers have wanted netbooks, but the sticking point was always the cost. Then came the netbook craze, which is accelerating as they get better and cheaper.

OpenGL 3 - what types of changes to expect from your favorite 3D

Filed under
Software

fireuser.com/blog: Now that OpenGL 3.0 is well on its way to a desktop nearby, you may be curious about what types of changes to expect from your favorite 3D applications. There are two main categories of improvements.

Why would anybody need PulseAudio?

Filed under
Software

blog.flameeyes.eu: That’s a very common question as of lately, and somehow I feel like most people who haven’t dealt with ALSA in the past would find it very difficult to properly answer to it. Even myself I would have ignored one particular issue till last night, when I hit another reason why I want to keep PulseAudio.

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GNOME Foundation to Receive $1M from Anonymous Donor over Next Two Years

The donation was made by an anonymous person, though the money will be received by the GNOME Foundation over the next couple of years. Honored by this gesture, the team pledges to use the money to hire more developers and streamline their operations to improve the GNOME desktop environment. "We are honored by the trust given to us and will work hard to justify that trust. This particular donation will enable us to support the GNOME project more widely, and tackle key challenges that the free software community faces," said Neil McGovern, Executive Director of GNOME Foundation. Read more

UP Core Plus SBC launches with Cyclone 10 and Myriad 2 AI add-ons

Aaeon has launched an “UP AI Edge” family of products that builds on a new Apollo Lake based “UP Core Plus” SBC with stacking AI companion boards based on the Movidius Myriad 2 or Intel Cyclone 10GX plus add-ons including a quad-GbE board and a camera. Aaeon Europe quickly met its modest $11K Kickstarter goal for the new UP AI Edge ecosystem, which builds on its UP board products and community. The centerpiece is a new UP Core Plus SBC, although the official, Ubuntu-equipped UP AI Edge development package uses the larger, more feature-rich UP Squared SBC. Read more

MX Tools - A year later, the toolbox got better

Roughly fourteen full phases of the moon ago, I wrote an article on MX Tools, a unique and useful bunch of dedicated utilities packaged with the MX Linux distribution. This toolbox offered the ordinary (or new) MX Linux user a chance to perform some common configuration tasks with easy and elegance. In general, MX-16 was a great player, and the recent MX-17 is even better - and at a first glance, so is the new version of MX Tools bundled with the system. Good stuff. So I set about testing, to see what has changed, and in what way this set of utilities has improved, if at all. But I'm positive. Let us commence. [...] MX Tools turned out to be a predictable gem, just as I'd expected. Well, I'm cheating, because I wrote this article after some rather thorough testing. But then, if you look across the wider spectrum of Linux home distributions, there aren't that many unique players with distinctive features. Quite often, it's the rehash of old and familiar with some extra color, polish and rebranding. MX Linux goes the extra mile (or kilometer, if you will) in making the newbie experience meaningfully different. Future improvements could potentially include an interactive walkthrough - so users will be actively prompted and helped along in their tasks. Then of course, there's the matter of visual appearance, in the UI itself. But in general, MX Tools TNG is better than we had before. More elegant, more streamlined, better looking, and most importantly, more practical. This is a good and useful toolbox, and it makes a solid distro even more appealing. Well worth testing. So do it. And take care. Read more

The story of Gentoo management

I have recently made a tabular summary of (probably) all Council members and Trustees in the history of Gentoo. I think that this table provides a very succinct way of expressing the changes within management of Gentoo. While it can’t express the complete history of Gentoo, it can serve as a useful tool of reference. What questions can it answer? For example, it provides an easy way to see how many terms individuals have served, or how long Trustee terms were. You can clearly see who served both on the Council and on the Board and when those two bodies had common members. Most notably, it collects a fair amount of hard-to-find data in a single table. Read more