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Tuesday, 19 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story How to build a successful open source community Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 11:47pm
Story Top 5 Custom ROM’s for Android Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 11:35pm
Story NVIDIA Wins Over AMD For Linux Gaming Ultra HD 4K Performance Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 11:23pm
Story Modello User Interface running on Tizen 3.0 & IVI SDK Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 11:18pm
Story 10 Quick Facts About Docker Container Virtualization Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 11:10pm
Story Super Pi Brothers Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 10:45pm
Story Debian is switching (back) to GLIBC Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 10:34pm
Story Linux Poetry Explains the Kernel, Line By Line Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 10:27pm
Story Why Migrating from Proprietary Software to Linux Is Cutting Costs for Ecommerce Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 5:25pm
Story Facebook turns its attentions to homegrown Wedge switch and Linux OS Roy Schestowitz 19/06/2014 - 5:22pm

Ubuntu ported to a PDA

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxdevices: Ubuntu Linux 7.04 is now available for Sharp's Zaurus PDAs. The 0.1 release comes with a minimalist filesystem that can be launched in an emulator, enhanced with software from the vast Ubuntu archives, and then flashed onto a real Zaurus.

"Can we fix it? Yes, we can!"

Filed under
OSS

Jeremy Allison: The OOXML document format war is over, and the good guys lost. The world will be a worse place because of it, for a long time to come. I recently got to attend a couple of conferences. Jim Zemlin, the head of the Linux Foundation, has a vision of where Linux should go in the next ten years, and it is breathtaking in scope.

The computer security paradox

Filed under
Security

raiden.net: One of the most prized rights of any American is the right to privacy and security. It's something people in some countries would kill for. Yet now there appears to be a very frightening trend growing. Your privacy and security are being thrown out the window wholesale in favor of easier access by law enforcement.

On Linux Hardware Compatibility

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

terminally-incoherent.com: I love how anti-linux advocates and windows fanbois always pick on Linux for hardware compatibility or rather lack of thereof. Just about every rant about Linux I have seen so far includes a gripe about it not supporting new or exotic hardware out of the box. Funny thing is that, neither does Windows.

some ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Back on the Linux bandwagon

  • Enable DVD Playback, Flash and MP3 Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu on Windows with Wubi
  • Known hardy bugs and workarounds
  • gimpsvn.sh — Install or update to GIMP 2.5 from SVN on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Ubuntu’s Hardy Heron nests at Fox News
  • A Smart Feature of Ubuntu You May Not Have Noticed
  • Installing Four Other Desktop Edition on Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu removing XML from Python?
  • Fun with Amazon S3 in Ubuntu

Compiz Fusion Community News for May 7th, 2008: An edition of bling and subtlty

Filed under
Software

More CF news is down the tubes this week, major highlights being A FULL sphere deformation mode for cubeaddon, A subtler static applications switcher, and A subtler set a viewport switching plugins.

The Year of the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: This is it. It’s now. Like it or not, you can quiver in your boots and moan about this driver or that hardware or the other usability feature, but I have two, solid irrefutable signs of the apocalypse.

Valve's Source Engine Coming To Linux

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: There have been rumors since last year that Valve may be serious about porting Source games to Linux after Valve Software began seeking a senior software engineer with the responsibility of porting Windows-based games to the Linux platform.

Linux Web services with Apache Synapse

Filed under
News

Discover Apache Synapse, a high-performance enterprise service bus with simple configuration, extensible architecture, and a minimal footprint. It is a versatile tool that you can use for a variety of tasks. This article examines how you can use Apache Synapse to create mock Web services.

Cairo-Dock is pain free eye candy

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: It's a weird phenomenon. Nearly every computer platform steals another one's look. Vista gets accused of trying to look too much like OS X. Linux desktops get accused of trying to look like Vista (except when they're accused of ripping off OS X).

Running Only on Open-Source Software

Filed under
OSS

eweek.com: Open-source software has found increasing acceptance within IT for infrastructure application - but many may still wonder, 'Is it possible to run a company almost entirely with open-source offerings?'

Does a Linux OS perform better than a Windows ?

Filed under
Linux

itvoir.com: No doubt Windows is still the candy of each user’s eye but Linux has evolved over a span and made its presence felt strongly in the market gradually. With many add ons as compared to Windows, there are a few interesting features about Linux.

Moonlighting Linux: the future of rich web apps

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: As we know, static HTML web sites are passé. Yet, Java applets never turned out to be the killer online application platform they possibly could have been. The modern introduction of Ajax has undoubtedly improved the web experience but it’s not a panacea. Here’s how to get started using the Moonlight development technology from the Mono Project.

Windows-based EeePC cheaper than Linux one

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

apcmag.com: Is ASUS in bed with Microsoft? The new XP-based EeePC 900 will actually be cheaper than the Linux-based version.

Slackware 12.1: Do-it-yourself-NUX

Filed under
Slack

techiemoe.com: Slackware is perhaps the closest thing on the market right now to a "generic" Linux distribution. You won't find branded wallpapers, special bootsplash screens, or really much at all that identifies your system as "Slackware" other than the LILO prompt.

OpenSolaris is here to stay

Filed under
OS

blogbeebe.blogspot: I've never gotten angrier after reading a blog post like I did after read Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols' post "OpenSolaris Arrive just to Die". The crux of sjvn's argument is: Still, all that said, I think OpenSolaris could survive, and possibly even thrive, if it wasn’t for one sad, simple fact.

OpenOffice.org 3 beta is ready for testing

Filed under
OOo

openoffice.org: The OpenOffice.org Community is pleased to announce that the public beta release of OpenOffice.org 3.0 is now available. This beta release is made available to allow a broad user base to test and evaluate the next major version of OpenOffice.org.

KDE 4.0.4 Released

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: he KDE Community today announced the immediate availability of KDE 4.0.4, the fourth bugfix and maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Miniature Linux PC targets military apps

  • Free Flash community reacts to Adobe Open Screen Project
  • Meet Inna Kuznetsova, IBM's Linux Strategy Director (video)
  • Lost in Linux Land 2
  • Essential Linux Device Drivers
  • A Brief History of Sun by Groklaw's grouch
  • Qt rev'd
  • Commentary: What's the deal with embedded Linux?
  • OpenSolaris Wants To Compete With Linux - Oh Yeah?
  • For gorsake, stop laughing, this is Linux!
  • Is open source dead?
  • Open source as the villain in its own story
  • OpenSolaris Just Wants to be Free
  • OLPC tries to bridge gap with developer community
  • OOXML expert: ODF flaws remain
  • Get some AIR on Linux
  • Reinventing OpenSolaris
  • It's official: The future of Sun/MySQL is open...and closed
  • DRM and unintended consequences

Everyone loves the Eee

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

zdnet.com: I spent the day at a conference sponsored by our SIS developer. What’s interesting, however, was the participants’ reactions to an Asus Eee PC that one of the other attendees brought with her.

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More in Tux Machines

Oracle: New VirtualBox 5.2 Beta, SPARC M8 Processors Launched

  • VirtualBox 5.2 to Let Users Enable or Disable Audio Input and Output On-the-Fly
    Oracle announced new updates for its popular, cross-platform and open-source virtualization software, the third Beta of the upcoming VirtualBox 5.2 major release and VirtualBox 5.1.28 stable maintenance update. We'll start with the stable update, VirtualBox 5.1.28, as it's more important for our readers using Oracle VM VirtualBox for all of their virtualization needs. The VirtualBox 5.1 maintenance release 28 is here to improve audio support by fixing various issues with both the ALSA and OSS backends, as well as an accidental crash with AC'97.
  • SPARC M8 Processors Launched
    While Oracle recently let go of some of their SPARC team, today marks the launch of the SPARC M8. The initial SPARC M8 line-up includes the T8-1, T8-2, T8-4. M8-8, and SuperCluster M8-8 servers.

Wikileaks Releases Spy Files Russia, CCleaner Infected, Equifax Has a Dirty Little Secret

  • Spy Files Russia
    This publication continues WikiLeaks' Spy Files series with releases about surveillance contractors in Russia. While the surveillance of communication traffic is a global phenomena, the legal and technological framework of its operation is different for each country. Russia's laws - especially the new Yarovaya Law - make literally no distinction between Lawful Interception and mass surveillance by state intelligence authorities (SIAs) without court orders. Russian communication providers are required by Russian law to install the so-called SORM ( Система Оперативно-Розыскных Мероприятий) components for surveillance provided by the FSB at their own expense. The SORM infrastructure is developed and deployed in Russia with close cooperation between the FSB, the Interior Ministry of Russia and Russian surveillance contractors.
  • Malware-Infected CCleaner Installer Distributed to Users Via Official Servers for a Month
    Hackers have managed to embed malware into the installer of CCleaner, a popular Windows system optimization tool with over 2 billion downloads to date. The rogue package was distributed through official channels for almost a month. CCleaner is a utilities program that is used to delete temporary internet files such as cookies, empty the Recycling Bin, correct problems with the Windows Registry, among other tasks. First released in 2003, it has become hugely popular; up to 20 million people download it per month. Users who downloaded and installed CCleaner or CCleaner Cloud between Aug. 15 and Sept. 12 should scan their computers for malware and update their apps. The 32-bit versions of CCleaner v5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud v1.07.3191 were affected.
  • Equifax Suffered a Hack [sic] Almost Five Months Earlier Than the Date It Disclosed
  • This is why you shouldn’t use texts for two-factor authentication

    For a long time, security experts have warned that text messages are vulnerable to hijacking — and this morning, they showed what it looks like in practice.

Amazon Changes Rental ('Cloud') Model on GNU/Linux

Devices/Hardware: Embedded/Boards, CODESYS, and EPYC Linux Performance

  • Linux friendly IoT gateway runs on 3.5-inch Bay Trail SBC
    While the MB-80580 SBC lists SATA II, the gateway indicates SATA III. Also, the gateway datasheet notes that the RS232 ports can all be redirected to RS232/422/485. Software includes Windows IoT Core and Server, as well as Yocto, Ubuntu Snappy Core, and CentOS Linux distributions.
  • Rugged panel PC scales up to a 19-inch touchscreen
    The fanless, IP65-rated WinSystems “PPC65B-1x” panel PC runs Linux or Win 10 on a quad-core Atom E3845, and offers 10.4 to 19-inch resistive touchscreens.
  • CODESYS announces CODESYS-compatible SoftPLC for open Linux device platforms
  • EPYC Linux performance from AMD
    Phoronix have been hard at work testing out AMD's new server chip, specifically the 2.2/2.7/3.2GHz EPYC 7601 with 32 physical cores.  The frequency numbers now have a third member which is the top frequency all 32 cores can hit simultaneously, for this processor that would be 2.7GHz.  Benchmarking server processors is somewhat different from testing consumer CPUs, gaming performance is not as important as dealing with specific productivity applications.   Phoronix started their testing of EPYC, in both NUMA and non-NUMA configurations, comparing against several Xeon models and the performance delta is quite impressive, sometimes leaving even a system with dual Xeon Gold 6138's in the dust.  They also followed up with a look at how EPYC compares to Opteron, AMD's last server offerings.  The evolution is something to behold.
  • Opteron vs. EPYC Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Watt: How AMD Server Performance Evolved Over 10 Years
    By now you have likely seen our initial AMD EPYC 7601 Linux benchmarks. If you haven't, check them out, EPYC does really deliver on being competitive with current Intel hardware in the highly threaded space. If you have been curious to see some power numbers on EPYC, here they are from the Tyan Transport SX TN70A-B8026 2U server. Making things more interesting are some comparison benchmarks showing how the AMD EPYC performance compares to AMD Opteron processors from about ten years ago.