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Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Patent Troll Kills Open Source Project On Speeding Up The Computation Of Erasure Codes Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:39am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:19am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:18am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:17am
Story Linux 3.18 Kernel: Not Much Change With Intel Haswell Performance Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 7:04am
Story Counterclockwise: Jolla, Nokia N1, Nexus and HTC One GPE Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 6:43am
Story Several Linux distros borrow Google’s Material Design ideas Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 6:38am
Story grep-2.21 released [stable] Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 5:38am
Story SUSE invests in software-defined storage Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 4:19am
Story Linux 3.18-rc6 Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 4:08am

Firefox 3.1 beta vs. Chrome beta

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Web browser dragster races: Firefox 3.1 beta vs. Chrome beta

  • Review: Firefox 3.1 Beta 1 no speed demon, lags behind Chrome
  • Firefox 3.1 raises the browser bar … again
  • First Look: Firefox 3.1 Beta Offers Speed, Better Searching and More

Zenwalk 5.2 ... hello old friend

Filed under
Linux

wamukota.blogspot: While rummaging through some old CD's I stumbled upon a Zenwalk 4.2 labeled one, which reminded me that last year I really liked that distro, but due to some BIOS problem on my laptop, it didn't behave the way I liked. Now, a year later, I was willing to give Zenwalk another try.

Flock 2.0 Has Arrived

Filed under
Software

webpronews.com: Flock, the social Web browser built on Mozilla Firefox is now out. Social networking users can have access to MySpace, Facebook, Digg, YouTube, Flickr, Picasa, Photobucket and Twitter via Flock's sidebar.

The great Ubuntu experiment

Filed under
Ubuntu

menace.co.nz: Many months ago, some very non-tech savvy friends where having trouble with their computer. Being someone that does ‘IT stuff’ meant I got called to help out their failing machine. What I found was a Windows XP machine riddled with malware. I decided to replace it with Ubuntu.

Nine Attitude Problems in Free and Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: I love free and open source software (FOSS). The cause -- essentially, an extension of free speech -- is one that I can get behind as a writer. At times, though, the community can be its own worst enemy. Certain attitudes, often long-ingrained, make the community less united than it should be.

25 essential Firefox add-ons for power users

Filed under
Moz/FF

techradar.com: A bare copy of Firefox is a wonderful thing, but when you start stuffing it with add-ons it gets even better. So what are the best add-ons for power users? Here's our top 25:

The Perfect Desktop - Mandriva One 2009.0 With GNOME

Filed under
MDV
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a Mandriva One 2009.0 desktop (with the GNOME desktop environment) that is a full-fledged replacement for a Windows desktop, i.e. that has all the software that people need to do the things they do on their Windows desktops.

Xfce 4.6 BETA-1 ('Fuzzy') released

Filed under
Software

We are one month since the release of Xfce 4.6 ALPHA. And now it's time to release the first BETA, codename 'Fuzzy'. A lot of bugs have been fixed in this release.

How Linux Can Conquer The Laptop

Filed under
Linux

informationweek.com: There's little question that Linux on laptops (and on PCs in general) is no longer nearly as complicated or painful as it used to be. The new problem is whether notebook manufacturers are going to readily offer Linux to consumers -- both regular folks on the street and corporate clients -- outside of designated niches.

Livin' La Vida Linux

Filed under
Linux

tuxdeluxe.org: Last weekend I finished a home project I've been slowly working on for several months. I finally finished converting all the CDs in my collection from physical media to digital files.

RPM Fusion enters testing state

Filed under
Software

liquidat.wordpress: RPM Fusion, a merge of several former Fedora 3rd party repositories providing licence/patent problematic packages, has entered the public testing state. Fedora Rawhide users can now start using it, and the brave among the Fedora 9 and Fedora 8 users can also help testing.

Surviving the recession with Free Enterprise OSes (Part 2)

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet: In Part 1, I discussed the four Free Linux distributions that are best position to provide extended support and ample functionality to an end user through a protracted recession. In this second part, I’m going to list the Enterprise-class Free and Open Source Operating Systems which have similar characteristics.

Adobe ships Flash Player 10

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: Adobe Systems Inc. began shipping its Adobe Flash Player 10 browser plug-in Wednesday with new features aimed at helping designers and developers build interactive content and online videos.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Evaluating desktop environments for Ubuntu 8.10

  • Installing Darned Small Linux Onto Your Boot Drive
  • Hardware Damaging Linux Networking Bug Fixed
  • mozilla developer news 10/14
  • Mini MINE
  • Ubuntu Installation Report Generator
  • CUPS printer service update closes security holes
  • How to Remove OpenOffice Splash Screen For Good
  • Bash Redirecting Input from Multiple Files
  • Portrait: Eric von Hippel, user innovation, and FOSS
  • Konqueror with Flash support (YouTube) on Gentoo
  • Report: Pure Open Source No Longer a Viable Business Model
  • New Additions to Buntfu Announced
  • The Linux Foundation’s FOSSBazaar Nearly Doubles its Membership
  • OpenOffice.org 3.0 now in a browser with Ulteo!
  • What OpenOffice site crash means
  • Mandriva Linux 2009 Titbits
  • Mandriva 2009 Linux Review

Desktop Linux: Certified, Not Certifiable

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com/blog: A lot of hardware vendors are jumping on the Linux bandwagon these days. Some of their pre-installed Linux systems are easier to find than others -- and some you might wish you hadn't found at all.

On GNOME: Gruber’s Wrong, But That Doesn’t Make Me Right

Filed under
Software

redmonk.com/sogrady: Just last week, I mentioned that when it came to Apple, there was no one whose commentary I respected more than John Gruber’s. Ironic, then, as he made his commentary on everything else invisible to me the very next week. Sad, too.

Ubuntu Server Edition At Wikipedia: Where’s the Revenue?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: First, the good news for Canonical and its loyal followers: Yes, Wikimedia Foundation (the company behind Wikipedia) is embracing Ubuntu on its servers in a big way. It sounds like there really isn’t much — if any — money flowing from Wikipedia to Canonical.

Firefox 3.1 beta 1 released and reviewed

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: Mozilla has released Firefox 3.1 Beta 1, the first official development release of the next update to Firefox 3 just about four months after its release past June.

Linux Standards Base 4.0 Beta Released

Filed under
Linux

linuxfoundation.org: In another step towards general release, the first beta of Linux Standard Base (LSB) 4.0 was released today. LSB 4.0 will introduce a new application checker, a new shell script checker, and a new multi-version software development kit (SDK) that will enable developers to build applications to earlier LSB specifications without changing SDKs.

Dell teams with Red Hat on open source

Filed under
Linux

vnunet.com: Red hat and Dell have announced an alliance that will see the systems giant offer the new midrange Red Hat Application Appliance.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.

Android Leftovers

Amazon Linux 2 - Who nicked my cheese?

So far, it's a relatively benign, easy introduction to a new operating system that blends the familiar and new in a timid package. Perhaps that's the goal, because a radical offering would right away scare everyone. Amazon Linux 2 is an appealing concept, as it gives users what Red Hat never quite did (yet) - A Fedora-like bleeding-edge tech with the stability and long-term support of the mainstay enterprise offering. But then, it also pulls a Debian/Ubuntu stunt by breaking ABI, so it will be cubicle to those who enjoying living la vida loco (in their cubicle or open-space prison). Having lived and breathed the large-scale HPC world for many years, I am quite piqued to see how this will evolve. Performance, stability and ease of use will be my primary concerns. Then, is it possible to hook up a remote virtual machine into the EC2 hive? That's another experiment, and I'd like to see if scaling and deployment works well over distributed networks. Either way, even if nothing comes out of it, Amazon Linux 2 is a nice start to a possibly great adventure. Or yet another offspring in the fragmented family we call Linux. Time will tell. Off you go. Cloud away. Read more

Updates From OpenIndiana and LibreOffice (Projects That Oracle Discarded)

  • Migration to GCC 6.4 as userland compiler
    Modulo some minor details, the transition of our userland to GCC 6 is complete.
  • OpenIndiana Has Upgraded To The GCC 6 Compiler
    The OpenSolaris/Illumos-based OpenIndiana operating system has finally moved past GCC 4.9 as its base user-land compiler and is now using GCC 6.4. This comes while GCC 8.1 should be officially released in the next few weeks and they are already targeting GCC 7.3.0 as their next illumos-gate compiler.
  • LibreOffice 6.0 Open-Source Office Suite Passes 1 Million Downloads Mark
    The Document Foundation announced recently that its LibreOffice 6.0 open-source and cross-platform office suite reached almost 1 million downloads since its release last month on January 31, 2018. That's terrific news for the Open Source and Free Software community and a major milestone for the acclaimed LibreOffice office suite, which tries to be a free alternative to proprietary solutions like Microsoft Office. The 1 million downloads mark was reached just two weeks after the release of LibreOffice 6.0, which is the biggest update ever of the open-source office suite adding numerous new features and enhancements over previous versions.