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Friday, 24 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Too many Linux distributions?

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: That’s one you often hear, right? There are too many Linux distributions, and that’s a problem. To some people, who then feel compelled to blog about it. Most of the times, the reasons stated are confusion for new Linux users, and lack of a unified install method for all Linuxes.

Benchmarking hardware RAID vs. Linux kernel software RAID

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Want to get an idea of what speed advantage adding an expensive hardware RAID card to your new server is likely to give you? You can benchmark the performance difference between running a RAID using the Linux kernel software RAID and a hardware RAID card. My own tests of the two alternatives yielded some interesting results.

The Value of Free

Filed under
OSS

goodcomputing.blogspot: How do you put a value on the products created through open source? Do you consider all the time spent crafting quality software? Take into account your own effort in advocating its use? Charge for packaging and a profit margin? How, exactly, would Best Buy have come to the conclusion that Ubuntu Linux is worth $19.99? I think the answer is fairly simple: they guessed.

Dang, Darn, Damn Small Linux!

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I've been looking at a very interesting variant of Linux called Damn Small Linux. Its 3 major contributors have basically taken a minimalist approach to Linux and have created a system that can provide a basic desktop running on an OS that's right around 50 Megabytes.

First few days with Mandriva 2009.0

Filed under
MDV

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: With the first few days (and couple of hundred updates) under the belt I can say a little bit more about my first impressions with the Alpha 2 release of Mandriva 2009. I started last Sunday and have been using it pretty much as the default since.

Virtual Hosting With Proftpd And MySQL (Incl. Quota) On Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a Proftpd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine. In addition to that I will show the use of quota with this setup.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • In Memory of Uwe Thiem

  • My Perfect Desktop: Kubuntu KDE 4
  • My kid hates Linux
  • The new and improved Ubuntu QA
  • Problems with encrypted networks in Fedora
  • If you use Linux, you MUST try gLabels
  • 2.6.26 at last
  • Brasero 0.8.0 gets cover editor, new plugin and much more
  • Edimax EW-7728In 802.11n (RaLink rt2860) with Linux 2.6.26

  • Tweaking the Eee PC part 3
  • Backup GMAIL with FetchMail
  • Use Vim As A Syntax Highlighting Pager
  • Using SFDISK to backup your partition table
  • Doom3 and Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory Fix
  • Screencasting from Linux/Ubuntu
  • Converting Binary Numbers To Decimal The Hard Way On Linux Or Unix

Amarok 2 alpha 1 looking strong

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: The first alpha release of Amarok 2 was made available for download last week. The popular open-source music player is undergoing a significant transformation and receiving a highly anticipated update for KDE 4.

Malware on GNU/Linux

Filed under
Security

[M]alware includes not just virii, but worms, trojans and root-kits. These known and widely available tools are not the only options available to intruders either. GNU/Linux users should not have any false sense of security just based on the fact that viruses designed for exclusively for windows won't run on GNU/Linux.

Flaws found in BSD, Linux software updaters

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com.au: The software update mechanisms used by most BSD and Linux operating systems can be tricked into installing buggy or known-to-be-compromised software on users' systems, creating serious security risks, according to new research.

An introduction to Wubi

Filed under
Software

technologytales.com: The Toshiba laptop that I acquired at the start of the year is a Windows Vista box and it isn’t something with which I want to play too roughly because the OS came pre-installed on it. I still want to continue to see how Vista goes at close quarters so removing it to put Ubuntu or some other Linux distribution on there wasn’t ever going to be an option.

Enterprises still not getting full benefits of open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: We have been discussing this for weeks here, but now there’s confirmation from Forrester Research. Enterprises are not getting the full benefits of open source. The real problem, it seems to me, is they don’t understand the nature of open source.

Shuttleworth: "Apple is driving the innovation"

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

derstandard.at: At the recent GNOME Users and Developers Conference (GUADEC) in Istanbul Andreas Proschofsky had the chance to sit down with Ubuntu-founder Mark Shuttleworth to talk about the new release, but also about the Linux desktop as a whole, the strengths of Apple and possible major changes to the GNOME platform.

Looking For Software? Gnomefiles May Help!

Filed under
Web

workswithu.com: One of the classic problems that newcomers to Linux face is locating and installing software to do the work they want to accomplish. The more than 20,000 packages that Ubuntu offers up can be daunting indeed. This is where sites like Gnomefiles.com can come in. Gnomefiles is a clearing house of software built on GTK, the application toolkit that underpins the Gnome desktop that Ubuntu uses.

Web apps: the next battleground for FOSS?

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Concerned about the increasing popularity of Web applications, Marco Barulli of the Clipperz project has written one of the first detailed suggestions about how free and open source software (FOSS) should respond to the trend. Although neither Barulli nor Clipperz is well-known, his ideas are being listened to by such figures as Richard M. Stallman and Fabrizio Capobianco.

BeOS-like distro focused on content creation

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux.com: A new Ubuntu-based Linux distribution has arrived, aimed at both Linux newbies and content creators. Boasting "out of the box" multimedia codecs, the freely downloadable PC/OS incorporates the lightweight XFCE desktop, and is said to offer a similar layout to the groundbreaking, but ultimately doomed BeOS.

Open source quality checker released

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: An open source software project, originally propped up by European Commission (EC) funds, has released an alpha version of its quality control program, Alitheia Core.

Blender 3D: Interview with Allan Brito

Filed under
Software
Interviews

packtpub.com: Blender is the open source, cross platform suite of tools for 3D creation, capable of modeling, rendering, and animating 3D environments. Packt spokesperson Meeba Abraham approached Allan Brito at the heart of this movement to understand his take on the future of Blender.

Toward an Open Source Society

Filed under
OSS

infoshop.org: One of the oldest arguments against anarchism is that it is impractical, that without central authority to keep the peons in line any large project will dissolve into chaos and disorder. Yet the open source software movement provides modern day proof that anarchism works, even when not conducted by anarchists.

ASUS Eee PC is a good option for a lightweight laptop

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Vincent Danen: The ASUS Eee PC has become a very popular sub-notebook recently and has undergone quite a few revisions since it was first introduced. Initially it had a smaller screen size and a much smaller drive capacity, but the more recent ASUS Eee PC 900 has rectified many of the perceived shortcomings of previous models.

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More in Tux Machines

Graphics: Mesa 17.2.6 RC, AMDGPU, and Vulkan

  • Mesa 17.2.6 release candidate
  • Mesa 17.2.6 RC Arrives With 50+ Fixes
    While Mesa 17.3 is imminent and should be released as stable within the next few days, Mesa 17.2.6 is being prepped for release as the current point release.
  • 43 More AMDGPU DC Patches Hit The Streets
    While the massive AMDGPU DC infrastructure has been merged for Linux 4.15, the flow of improvements to this display code continues and it looks like the next few kernel cycles at least could be quite busy on the AMD front.
  • A Prototype Of The Vulkan Portability Initiative: Low-Level 3D To Vulkan / D3D12 / Metal
    A Mozilla engineer has put out a prototype library in working on the Vulkan Portability Initiative for allowing low-level 3D graphics support that's backed by Vulkan / Direct3D 12 / Metal. With Apple sticking to their own Metal graphics API and Direct3D 12 still being the dominant graphics API on Windows 10, The Khronos Group has been working towards better 3D portability for where Vulkan may not be directly supported by the OS/drivers or otherwise available. They've been working to target a subset of the Vulkan API that can be efficiently mapped to these other native graphics APIs and to have the libraries and tooling for better compatibility and code re-use of these different graphics APIs.

Kernel: Linux 4.15, TLDR, and Linus Torvalds' Latest Rant

  • Linux 4.15 Adds AMD Raven Ridge Audio ID
    Not only is AMD Stoney Ridge audio (finally) being supported by the Linux 4.15 kernel, but it also looks like Raven Ridge audio should now be working too.
  • Linux 4.14.2 Fixes The BCache Corruption Bug
    Normally I don't bother mentioning new Linux kernel point releases on Phoronix unless there are some significant changes, as is the case today with Linux 4.14.2.
  • TLDR is what Linux man pages always should have been
    If you get stuck using a Linux tool, the first port of call shouldn’t be to Stack Overflow, but rather its “man pages.” Man — which is short for manual — retrieves documentation for a given program. Unfortunately, this can often be dense, hard to understand, and lacking in practical examples to help you solve your problem. TLDR is another way of looking at documentation. Rather than being a comprehensive guide to a given tool, it instead focuses on offering practical example-driven instructions of how something works.
  • Linux creator Linus Torvalds: This is what drives me nuts about IT security
    Developers are often accused of not thinking about security, but Linux kernel founder Linus Torvalds has had enough of security people who don't think about developers and end-users. After blasting some kernel developers last week for killing processes in the name of hardening the kernel, Torvalds has offered a more measured explanation for his frustration with security myopia. While he agrees that having multiple layers of security in the kernel is a good idea, certain ways of implementing it are not, in particular if it annoys users and developers by killing processes that break users' machines and wreck core kernel code. Because ultimately, if there are no users, there's not much point in having a supremely secure kernel, Torvalds contends.

Unity 7 Hoping To Become An Official Flavor For Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

While Canonical abandoned their work on the Unity desktop environment in favor of the Unity-inspired customized GNOME Shell that debuted in Ubuntu 17.10, some within the community have remained interested in maintaining Unity 7 and even getting it into an official spin/flavor of Ubuntu. Posted today to the community.ubuntu.com was a Unity maintenance roadmap, reiterating the hope by some in the Ubuntu community for Ubuntu Unity to become an official LTS distribution of Ubuntu. They are hoping to make it an official flavor alongside Kubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Xubuntu, and others. Read more Original/direct: Unity Maintenance Roadmap

Programming/Development: Django and Google India

  • An introduction to the Django ORM
    One of the most powerful features of Django is its Object-Relational Mapper (ORM), which enables you to interact with your database, like you would with SQL. In fact, Django's ORM is just a pythonical way to create SQL to query and manipulate your database and get results in a pythonic fashion. Well, I say just a way, but it's actually really clever engineering that takes advantage of some of the more complex parts of Python to make developers' lives easier.
  • Hey, Coders! Google India Is Offering 130,000 Free Developer Scholarships — Here’s How To Apply
  • Google to prepare 1.3 lakh Indians for emerging technologies

    "The new scholarship programme is in tandem with Google's aim to train two million developers in India. The country is the second largest developer ecosystem in the world and is bound to overtake the US by 2021," William Florance, Developer Products Group and Skilling Lead for India, Google, told reporters here.