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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenELEC 4.0.6 Is Now Based on Linux Kernel 3.14.8 Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 8:53am
Story Ubuntu Touch Core App Hack Days Announced in Anticipation of RTM Version Rianne Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 8:45am
Story New Linus Interview, LinuxQuestions.org, and Floundering Ubuntu Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 8:20am
Story Native Android apps are coming to Chrome OS Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 1:00am
Story Google touts 1 billion active Android users per month Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:55am
Story Neptune 4.0 Release with new homepage Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:51am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:36am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:34am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 26/06/2014 - 12:34am
Story Google I/O Offers Devs Big Bonanza Rianne Schestowitz 25/06/2014 - 11:47pm

Stuart Cohen: Meet the Man Behind the Collaborative Software Initiative

Filed under
Interviews

linux-mag.com: Disruptive technologies meet staid businesses. Stuart Cohen is bringing the open source development model together with big business, and finding it to be a perfect fit. Joe Brockmeier talks to Cohen about the Collaborative Software Initiative’s first year, and where it’s going from here.

Red Hat defends UK's open source record

Filed under
Linux

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: Is the UK really a laggard in open source? Red Hat denies there is any problem. There are plenty of people who disagree with him. OpenForum's Graham Taylor, speaking at the same event, is just the latest person to say the UK is crap at open source.

Fedora 9 - handle with care

Filed under
Linux

blogs.sun.com/venky: When i was at the toshiba service center to get my laptop serviced, i saw a customer use fedora 8 for his laptop OS. This got me interested and since fedora 9 just got released, i downloaded it and installed it on my laptop today.

Making Hardy Heron as LTS is a tactical mistake

Filed under
Ubuntu

dogbuntu.wordpress: In April Canonical released Ubuntu 8.04 LTS more popularly known as Hardy Heron. It was the eighth Ubuntu version to be released so far but more importantly it is an LTS release which means that it would be supported 3 years for the desktop and five years for the servers.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • FAQ: How to select fastest APT server in Debian

  • Unix Create a Symbolic Link
  • How to add a Disclaimer To Outgoing Emails in Postfix
  • Table and table-text flow control features for OpenOffice Writer
  • Sliding into SELinux Policy Development with Fedora 9
  • Install multimedia Support in Fedora 9
  • Ubuntu 8.04 “Hardy Heron” Broadcom Wireless

Twenty Four Hours with Mint 5.0 Beta

Filed under
Linux

bmc.com/blogs: These days the Distro I am always watching and waiting for a new release of, more than any other, is Mint. I have expressed that preference here quite a bit since I discovered Mint back in its 3.x release days. Mint 5.0 Beta is out now, and I am not really sure why it is considered Beta. All I have had with it so far is about 24 hours, but it is solid.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 22

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #22 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue Linuxtag 2008 - latest information, People of openSUSE: Marcus Hüwe, and Upcoming… openSUSE 11.0beta3.

Firefox 3 Themes

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.mozilla.com/faaborg: If you are reading this post odds are you are one of the 1.2 million people currently enjoying a beta or nightly build of Firefox 3. However are you a big enough Firefox fan that you like to run it simultaneously on 4 different platforms? If not, here are some screen shots of the new themes for Firefox 3 for Vista, Linux, OS X and XP.

The Perfect Server - Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up a Fedora 9 server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters: Apache web server (SSL-capable) with PHP5 and Ruby, Postfix mail server with SMTP-AUTH and TLS, BIND DNS server, Proftpd FTP server, MySQL server, Dovecot POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Eee PC: the perfect computer for a conference?

  • Penumbra: Black Plague Now Available for Linux and Mac/Unbirth Alpha Demo
  • Top 10 Things That You Need to Do After Installing Hardy Heron
  • Installing Google Applications in Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron
  • Chandra and VLA spot Firefox logo
  • Finding An "Invisible" Proc's Working Directory Without lsof On Linux Or Unix
  • Low-end RAID controllers support Linux
  • Terminator runs multiple GNOME terminals in the same window
  • Linux rides pillion on Mumbai city buses
  • Doubting the Debian Doubters
  • STFUbuntu - The HOT New Linux Distro
  • First public release of Silverlight for Linux is out
  • Review of the New OpenOffice 3 beta
  • The community is angry!

Ubuntu Stealing Linux Thunder?

Filed under
Linux

osweekly.com: There is a growing identity crisis in the Linux community. In simplest terms, is Ubuntu taking the spotlight away from other deserving Linux distributions? This has been charged over and again.

Praise for the Humble gedit

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: I’ve been a fan of lightweight text editors for more than 10 years now. I started out on Emacs, drifted over to Vi(m) for a long stretch and then somehow settled into Textmate for the last couple of years. This week, since I’ve been bouncing from OS to OS, I’m checking in with a number of text editors that I’ve either never used or haven’t visited in a long time. Having been a KDE guy back in the day, gedit falls under the former category.

Adobe rolls out beta of Flash Player 10

Filed under
Software

computerworld.com: Adobe Systems Inc. today rolled out a beta version of its Adobe Flash Player 10 (formerly called Astro) browser plug-in, which adds features to help designers and developers create special effects and cinematic Web experiences.

Also: Flash Player 10: Dazzling Effects, Better Performance, Runs on Linux

Linux: Who got it right, who got it very wrong?

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.com.au: Who predicted Linux servers would outnumber Windows servers by 2006? Who said one in five enterprise desktops would be Linux-based by 2008? We look back at the bad (and good) predictions made about Linux over the past decade.

The Many Faces Of Linux

Filed under
Linux

crn.com: Nowadays, the Linux user experience is slick, clean, and aesthetically pleasing, thanks to the GNOME and KDE desktop environments. Users can keep the same desktop experience from distribution to distribution.

How Windows helped me fix my Linux

Filed under
Linux

alternativenayk.wordpress: Last night, my Linux (PCLinux) broke. And this evening I finally fixed it, with some help from Windows. It was clearly my mistake in the start the led to the demise of my Linux. I messed around with my partition table.

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Change Permissions on Password files so no one can change them

  • 5 Asus Eee PC Customization Tips You'll Love
  • Install STUX Linux to a USB flash drive
  • How to: Install a Debian/Ubuntu package (.deb) cache server - apt-cacher
  • Firefox Flash Plugin on Fedora 9
  • OpenSSH ( SSHD ) Speed Optimization For Long Distance Data Transfer
  • The Ultimate SSH Security Tutorial
  • Linux: Watching Streaming channels via TVAnts

Other Open Source headlines

Filed under
OSS
  • Why open source developers can be more productive

  • "Good enough" ethics and "good enough" open source
  • Is "the community" hurting the OSS business model?
  • Filling In The Gaps With Open Source
  • Bdale Garbee: A fascinating 'open source celebrity' (video)
  • Reflections on Open Source Commerce, Pt. 1
  • NPR station WBUR Boston adds support for free audio standard

Firefox 3 is coming - is it everything we hoped for?

Filed under
Moz/FF

bigmouthmedia.com: There is no official release date as yet, but Mozilla's vice president of engineering announced on the Mozilla Developer Center blog that they are hoping for a release date in late May.

Exceptional Linux Programs for Kids

Filed under
Software

fanaticattack.com: There’s nothing worse than hearing how an entire school district is switching operating systems from Mac to Windows (or vice versa) because that’s what the “business” world relies on or some other blather. The idea in technology (and education for that matter), is to teach concepts so the whole underrated independent thinking mode can kick in. Below is a round-up of exceptional Linux programs for children.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Games: Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D., Arcan 0.5.3, Wine Staging 2.17

  • Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. from former Valve worker should hopefully come to Linux
    Half-Life: C.A.G.E.D. [Steam] is a mod from former Valve worker Cayle George, it's a short prison escape and it should be coming to Linux. Mr George actually worked on Team Fortress 2 and Portal 2 during his time at Valve, but he's also worked for other notable developers on titles like Horizon Zero Dawn.
  • Game Engine Powered Arcan Display Server With Durden Desktop Updated
    Arcan, the open-source display server powered by a game engine, is out with a new release. Its Durden desktop environment has also been updated. Arcan is a display server built off "the corpse of a game engine" and also integrates a multimedia framework and offers behavior controls via Lua. Arcan has been in development for a half-decade while its original code traces back more than a decade, as explained previously and has continued advancing since.
  • Arcan 0.5.3, Durden 0.3
    It’s just about time for a new release of Arcan, and way past due for a new release of the reference desktop environment, Durden. Going through some of the visible changes on a ‘one-clip or screenshot per feature’ basis:
  • Razer plans to release a mobile gaming and entertainment device soon
    NVIDIA, another big player in the gaming hardware and lifestyle space, released an Android-based portable gaming and entertainment console called the NVIDIA Shield that emphasized in-home streaming, and the Ouya console that Razer acquired (and discontinued) ran Android. But Razer decided to use Windows instead of Android on the Edge.
  • Wine Staging 2.17 is out with more Direct3D11 features fixing issues in The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more
    Wine Staging 2.17 is another exciting release, which includes more Direct3D11 features which fixes issues with The Witcher 3, Overwatch and more. As a reminder, Wine Staging is the testing area for future Wine development released, which will eventually be made into stable Wine releases.

KDE: Plasma 5.11 in Kubuntu 17.10, Krita 3.3, Randa and Evolution of Plasma Mobile

  • KDE Plasma 5.11 Desktop Will Be Coming to Kubuntu 17.10 Soon After Its Release
    KDE kicked off the development of the KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment a few months ago, and they've already published the Beta release, allowing users to get a first glimpse of what's coming in the final release next month. Canonical's Ubuntu Desktop team did a great job bringing the latest GNOME 3.26 desktop environment to the upcoming Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) operating system, and it looks like the Kubuntu team also want to rebase the official flavor on the forthcoming KDE Plasma 5.11 desktop environment.
  • Krita 3.3 Digital Painting App Promises Better HiDPI Support on Linux & Windows
    Work on the next Krita 3.x point release has started, and a first Release Candidate (RC) milestone of the upcoming Krita 3.3 version is now ready for public testing, giving us a glimpse of what's coming in the new release. In the release announcement, Krita devs reveal the fact that they were forced to bump the version number from 3.2.x to 3.3.x because the upcoming Krita 3.3 release will be introducing some important changes for Windows platforms, such as support for the Windows 8 event API, thus supporting the n-trig pen in Surface laptops.
  • Randa-progress post-hoc
    So, back in Randa I was splitting my energies and attentions in many pieces. Some attention went to making pancakes and running the kitchen in the morning — which is stuff I take credit for, but it is really Grace, and Scarlett, and Thomas who did the heavy lifting, and Christian and Mario who make sure the whole thing can happen. And the attendees of the Randa meeting who pitch in for the dishes after lunch and dinner. The Randa meetings are more like a campground than a 5-star hotel, and we work together to make the experience enjoyable. So thanks to everyone who pitched in. Part of a good sprint is keeping the attendees healthy and attentive — otherwise those 16-hour hacking days really get to you, in spite of the fresh Swiss air. [...] You can read more of what the attendees in Randa achieved on planet KDE (e.g. kdenlive, snappy, kmymoney, marble, kube, Plasma mobile, kdepim, and kwin). I’d like to give a special shout out to Manuel, who taught me one gesture in Italian Sign Langauage — which is different from American or Dutch Sign Language, reminding me that there’s localization everywhere.
  • The Evolution of Plasma Mobile
    Back around 2006, when the Plasma project was started by Aaron Seigo and a group of brave hackers (among which, yours truly) we wanted to create a user interface that is future-proof. We didn’t want to create something that would only run on desktop devices (or laptops), but a code-base that grows with us into whatever the future would bring. Mobile devices were already getting more powerful, but would usually run entirely different software than desktop devices. We wondered why. The Linux kernel served as a wonderful example. Linux runs on a wide range of devices, from super computers to embedded systems, you would set it up for the target system and it would run largely without code changes. Linux architecture is in fact convergent. Could we do something similar at the user interface level?

Ubuntu: "Artful Aardvark" Preview, GNOME 3.26 Apps on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS via Snaps, Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes and Community Council

  • Ubuntu 17.10 "Artful Aardvark" Preview Part 6: The New Tweaks
    Artful will have a new GNOME Tweak Tool, version 3.26, which is called Tweaks now. This tool provides you capability to alter your desktop, such as moving control buttons from left to right, adjusting options, or disabling/enabling Shell extensions. Take a look to its new stuffs below.
  • You'll Soon Be Able to Run GNOME 3.26 Apps on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS via Snaps
    Don't know if you recall, but we told you that Canonical, the company behind the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, is working on a packaging more GNOME apps as Snaps for Ubuntu and other Snappy-enabled distros. Well, it turns out that they've been working on a Platform Snap for the recently released GNOME 3.26 desktop environment, which should allow users of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to run the latest apps from the GNOME 3.26 Stack as Snaps, as well as developers to package their apps as Snaps. "We’ve been working on a Platform Snap for GNOME 3.26 to allow you to run the latest GNOME apps on Xenial as well as making Snaps for the new apps," reveals Will Cooke, Ubuntu Desktop Director at Canonical, in his latest weekly report. "This should be ready for testing soon and we’d appreciate some feedback."
  • Ubuntu Desktop Weekly Update: September 22, 2017
    We’re less than a week away from Final Beta! It seems to have come round very quickly this cycle. Next week we’re at the Ubuntu Rally in New York City where we will be putting the finishing touches to the beta. In the meantime, here’s a quick rundown on what happened this week:
  • Canonical Distribution of Kubernetes: Development Summary 2017.38
    In our current sprint we’ve started testing 1.8.0 in anticipation of the upstream release at the end of this month. We’re also testing with docker 1.13.1, which will soon become the default in CDK.
  • Ubuntu Community Council 2017 election under way!
    The Ubuntu Community Council election has begun and ballots sent out to all Ubuntu Members. Voting closes September 27th at end of day UTC. The following candidates are standing for 7 seats on the council:     Anis El Achèche – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/elacheche     Leo Arias – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/elopio     Danial Behzadi – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/danialbehzadi     (incumbent) Marco Ceppi – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/marco-ceppi     Aaron Honeycutt – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/AaronHoneycutt     Walter Lapchynksi – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/wxl     Marius Quabeck – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/marius.quabeck     José Antonio Rey – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/jose     Larry Tavin – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/wildmanne39     Iulian Udrea – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/IulianUdrea     Martin Wimpress – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MartinWimpress     Naeil Zoueidi – https://wiki.ubuntu.com/nzoueidi