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Saturday, 20 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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root ain't what it used to be

Filed under
Linux

blog.bytemark.co: My own groundhog day is a debate with customers about what constitutes "typical" Linux security precautions. If you’re a Linux administrator of any experience, you might find some of the following statements rather familiar:

two teehees & a quote

Filed under
Humor
  • Linux flavors you might not have heard of

  • How to know you’re dating a free software guy?
  • Quote of the week

Getting notified when Debian repository updates

Filed under
Linux

As a real Debian unstable addict, for a long time, I wanted to have real time notifications when upstream repository updates. So I can immediately check what's new and, time permitted, do the upgrade right away. Fortunately, I had some spare time few weeks ago that I invested in developing a neat script that you can find attached.

live.linuX-gamers.net updates

Filed under
Linux

linux-gamers.net: Some updates have been done to the live.linuX-gamers.net project: Mastering environment for base of version 0.9.4 is available, Game packages for version 0.9.4 are available, and a Bunch of minor changes.

Bitbucket is no Bit bucket

Filed under
Software

lucumr.pocoo.org: When github appeared on the internets for the first time, there was a short period of time when I saw the admins of that site jump into many IRC channels of projects that were using git already to switch to github for hosting. Personally for me that was alarming because after a while it appered that git without the hub was no accepted option any more for open source projects.

Free Software

Filed under
OSS

huffingtonpost.com: Like nearly everyone else these days, I use computers to write, read email, browse the web, store music and photos, and generally organize my life. Unlike most people, I'm using a free operating system, rather than Microsoft's Windows/Vista, or Apple's Mac OS. Specifically, I'm using Ubuntu.

Finally Fully Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

towardsmecca.com: Back in March, I wrote about my first experience with Ubuntu. Although it was a very pleasant one, I kept my Vista installed and couldn’t convince my wife to switch over. I would sometimes boot into Vista myself to use Photoshop. That was the last string holding me back.

Also: Switching: Moving from openSUSE to Ubuntu

OpenOffice 3 Release Candidate Arrives

Filed under
OOo

sjvn: This is more than a little cool. Those of us who don't like paying the Microsoft Office suite tax have been waiting for the next version of OpenOffice for some time now and it's almost ready to go.

eWeek's Peter Galli joins M$ open-source team

Filed under
Microsoft

news.cnet: Who knew that when eWeek's Peter Galli wrote in 2007 about Microsoft fracturing the open-source community, Galli would become the very person to help strengthen Microsoft's role in the open-source community?

Installing Drupal 6.4 On A Lighttpd Web Server (Debian Etch)

Filed under
HowTos

This guide explains how you can install Drupal 6.4 on a lighttpd web server on Debian Etch. Drupal comes with an .htaccess file with mod_rewrite rules (for Apache) that do not work on lighttpd. Without this .htaccess file it is not possible to have clean URLs in your Drupal installation.

Ubuntu should not copy the Mac

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet: Ubuntu is putting serious investment into improving the interface of its Linux. Mark Shuttleworth wants Linux to become comparable to the Apple Macintosh. Good idea. But the Ubuntu Developer Summit is taking the wrong approach.

Xfce 4.6 ALPHA ('Pinkie') released

Filed under
Software

xfce.org: After about 18 months of development, we are pleased to announce the release of Xfce 4.6 ALPHA, codename 'Pinkie'.

Battle Brews Over Firefox In Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Moz/FF
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Firefox, what's not to love about this open-source web browser? Well, a number of users following the development work on Ubuntu 8.10 (the Intrepid Ibex) are feeling rather outraged over Mozilla Firefox 3.0.2 and later. In the latest Ubuntu packages, Firefox requires an EULA (End-User License Agreement) be accepted the first time you launch the browser.

mythtv: A personal TV recorder

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: No one likes to sit at home and wait for their favorite show to come on anymore and many have turned to buying hardware to record them for later viewing. Popular solutions to this problem include the expensive and proprietary TiVo and cable/satellite boxes with built-in TV recorders. MythTV aims to solve these problems without the need to rent a cable box ($15/month) or buy a TiVo (~$200).

Cousin MilaX

Filed under
OS

kmandla.wordpress: A thoughtful forum member sent me a PM mentioning MilaX, which employs a lot of the lightweight software I mention here, and some more that I mention here. I promised to take a look at it and today, I finally got a free moment to do just that.

Two betas in the road to Firefox 3.1

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Two betas in the road to Firefox 3.1

  • 5 Useful Tips to Customise Firefox 3
  • about:addons - Sep 13

gOS 3 Google Gadgets Review

Filed under
Linux

penguinway.net: This weekend I decided to take the Linux distribution known as gOS for a spin. The gOS is an Ubuntu 8.04.1 derivative that shows some promise with it’s integration of Web applications. Although they are not affilated with Google, gOS has incorporated many Google online tools into their desktop.

What is happening in the world of Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: I have been talking about Ubuntu for a number of articles now and how easy it is to use. In this article I will look at the next two upcoming versions and investigate what they have to offer.

What To Look For In Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Previously, I covered some features that might be included in Fedora 10. Today, here are some interesting features that have already been approved.

some bloggings

Filed under
Linux
  • Word-of-mouth is Linux’s best bet for success

  • What is with the all Linux users?
  • Things I Miss in Linux
  • Big LOL at a Linux old-timer
  • Why Linux funding will skyrocket
  • Linux: It’s Not About Winning
  • Recording Sound in Kubuntu 8.10 (running KDE 4.1)
  • Dell Mini 9 Netbook Unboxing
  • The commonwealth fights back against OOXML?
  • My First Linux Encounter or How to Switch to Linux
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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.