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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ZaReason CEO Sounds Off on Linux, Hardware ‘Compatibility’ srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 5:30pm
Story Giving a Clunky Old CMS the WordPress Treatment srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 5:28pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 7:02am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 6:48am
Story Visually See The Contents Of A Folder Or Hard Drive With Baobab srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 6:41am
Story Pardus 2011.2 review srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 3:28am
Story Winds of Change... srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 3:27am
Story FSF Relaunches Software Directory srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 3:26am
Story Instant Messaging With Kopete srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 12:08am
Story Open Source Desktop Publishing 2011 srlinuxx 30/09/2011 - 12:05am

Help Create Opensuse Slogan!

Filed under
SUSE

As you may or may not know, openSUSE is in need of a slogan, a mission statement, a "one-liner", if you will. Ubuntu has their "Linux for human beings" slogan, now it's time to help create ours. This is an awesome chance to help define how the openSUSE project will be presented to the masses.

A first look at SimplyMEPIS 6.5 (rc2)

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

So, there I was in Salt Lake City, sick as a dog, with my faithful IBM T40 ThinkPad. This system uses a 1.5 GHz Pentium M processor with 1 MB of L2 cache, and a 400 MHz FSB (Front Side Bus). It has 512 MB of DDR SDRAM memory, and a built-in ATI Mobility Radeon 9000 AGP 4x with 32 MB of VRAM for graphics.

Firefox 3 release schedule draft

Filed under
Moz/FF

In the latest Firefox 3 status meeting, a release schedule draft was published. In brief:

* Alpha 4, by the end of April
* Alpha 5, by the end of May
* Alpha 6, by the end of June
* Beta 1, in July
* Beta 2, on September

So, considering a run of release candidates during October, Firefox 3 should be around November according to this schedule. I find it somewhat aggressive.

Linux tip - booting multiple desktop environments

Filed under
HowTos

If you just can’t choose between GNOME and KDE, or you just want a change of scenery every now and then, it’s really easy to install multiple desktop environments and seamlessly switch between them.

It’s really easy to install them - just use your distribution’s package management system to add your desktop environment of choice.

The Newbies Guide to Compiling Your First Kernel

Filed under
HowTos

So you've been using Linux for a while now and have decided to take the next step. Whether you are looking for a performance increase, added hardware support or even just to enhance your geek cred, compiling your own kernel need not be a horrifying experience. Compiling a kernel has historically been a very involved and, at times, frustratingly hair pulling experience for new Linux users.

Damn Small Linux The Portable Desktop

Filed under
Linux

We’ve written about portable apps quite a number of times in the past, but why bother with just apps when there’s a whole OS that’ll fit on a 50MB USB stick? Damn Small Linux, sometimes abbreviated DSL, is a 50MB mini desktop Linux distribution.

Using Sharp Fonts On A GNOME Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

You might have noticed that fonts are quite fuzzy on Linux desktops which can make your eyes ache if you have to sit in front of your computer all day long. Font rendering is still a little bit awkward and one of the last weaknesses of Linux desktops. This tutorial shows how you can make GNOME and all GNOME applications (such as Evolution, the file browser Nautilus, etc.) use sharp fonts.

The new Mandriva Linux: Here Comes The Spring!

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva Linux 2007 Spring is the latest edition of Mandriva Linux, the product of more than than nine years of continuous innovation for desktops and enterprise servers.

Cathedrals, Bazaars and Advocates

Filed under
OSS

In “The Cathedral and The Bazaar” Eric S. Raymond tried to convince the world that the open source development model (the bazaar) was better and cheaper than the traditional -closed- model (the cathedral). Of course this it utter nonsense. When I think of a bazaar I remember the soukh of Marrakech or Casablanca.

Mozilla social network add-on flies the coop

Filed under
Moz/FF

If you’re tired of having to visit your favorite social network, whenever you want to message friends or share content, why not have the network come to you for a change?

That’s exactly what Mozilla has planned with their Mozilla Labs experiment, “The Coop“. The Coop is a Firefox browser extension that places the social network exactly where you’d use it the most - your browser.

What it’s really like to use Linux 24/7/365

Filed under
Linux

Just over a year ago, I made the decision to dual boot my laptop (which is also my primary computer) with Ubuntu and Windows XP. I’ve spent the majority of that time in my Linux partition and I haven’t actually booted into Windows in over a month now.

Creating hackergotchis using the GIMP

Filed under
HowTos

A hackergotchi is a picture of a person's head that's used as an avatar for identification on a blog. Any region below the neck is cut out, as are any portions of the picture that don't include the head. You can create a hackergotchi easily with a digital camera and the GIMP.

Distribution Release: SimplyMEPIS 6.5

Filed under
Linux

After three months of intensive development, Warren Woodford has announced the final release of SimplyMEPIS 6.5: "SimplyMEPIS 6.5 for 32 and 64 bit Intel and AMD based PCs and MacTels has been released by MEPIS.

MyahOS 3.0 Tech Demo 1 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Toward the end of last week the first tech demo for the upcoming MyahOS 3.0 was released. The Myah 3.0 Tech Demo 1 LiveCD is optimized for i686 systems and is built using the Linux-Live scripts and has a lot of new packages including the Linux 2.6.20.2 kernel, GCC 4.1.2, X.Org 7.2, and Xfce 4.4.

Linux Foundation Expands Membership

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, has announced three new members who represent the increasing opportunity for Linux as it continues to mature on devices.

What Do You Love and Hate about Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

As Ubuntu is the best thing that happened to me in the last year or so (I was a Fedora user before), I will take a moment and write this article about it.

I’m Going Back To Windows

Filed under
Linux

No. Not me personally. It’s the threat that we, as Linux users and developers, hear constantly. It’s on the forums, mailing lists and IRC. These ridiculous threats, that if something in the Linux operating system is not fixed or handled to their liking, they’re running back to Windows. To me, it seems to be getting worse and worse.

Why Linux LiveCDs are Important? How Useful are They?

Filed under
Linux

There a plenty of linux live cd, check out frozentech.com, scroll down the list and you will see this line:

Currently displaying 315 LiveCD/DVDs

With various tools such as Kadischi, linux live script, Ubuntu Customization Kit etc, you can easily come out your own live cd. What you required is just the matter of time to fine tune and customized your software included in your live cd.

Pick a License, Any License

Filed under
OSS

I hate software licenses. When I read a software license, what I see is a bunch of officious, mind-numbing lawyerly doublespeak. Blah, blah, blah.. kill me now.

How to script songs lyrics retrieval

Filed under
HowTos

I recently wrote a simple bash script to incorporate a lyrics database into some of my music-handling scripts. I took advantage of one of the benefits of open source software by finding an existing application that performed this task and inspecting the code to see how the developers did it.

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more