Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Recently in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 8:31am
Story Fedora Good, Bad, & Ugly and Debian's Rise Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:41am
Story 64-bit ARM FreeBSD Support Is Taking Shape Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:38am
Story QEMU 2.2-rc3 Released, Final Release Pushed Back By Couple Days Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:34am
Story NSA partners with Apache to release open-source data traffic program Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:29am
Story Expensive "Free/Libre Software Laptop" Uses A NVIDIA GPU Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:21am
Story Docker Update Fixes Pair of Critical Security flaws Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:17am
Story Linux-based AUV maps Antarctic sea ice thickness Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:10am
Story DragonFlyBSD 4.0 Drops i386 Support, Improves Graphics Rianne Schestowitz 26/11/2014 - 6:05am
Story Step by step to install OwnCloud server on Ubuntu 14.04 gamblisku 26/11/2014 - 2:32am

Opera 9.61 released

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Hot on the heels of 9.60, we had to release Opera 9.61 to address problems in Opera Link. Alone, each issue we discovered was miniscule and shouldn't have caused any problems, but together, and coupled with some server issues, it turned out to be more serious than we thought.

In these trying economic times will Linux be the answer

Filed under
Linux

dthomasdigital.wordpress: I was told today that if I’m lucky my budget will only be cut by 10%. Being that I work for State government you would think that I would be more worried than I am. Then why do I think this is a great opportunity for me?

Why should Microsoft fans want (even help!) Linux to succeed

Imagine that your football team wins the championship the last years and it has completely crashed all competition. Would you be happy with the way your team played with no competition at all? It would surely play crappy, because it wouldn't need to try any harder.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Debian Project News - October 20th, 2008

  • gOS To Support Intel's Moblin Project
  • Gallery 2.3 (Skidoo) Released
  • Novell Betas Open Enterprise Server 2 SP1
  • Inquisitor stresses and benchmarks your hardware
  • Canonical Hiring KDE Desktop Developer
  • The dying embers of Microsoft's IP claims against open source
  • Back to Linux
  • Vinyl + Audacity = MP3
  • Test Drive Firefox 3.1 Beta 1
  • Where Would We Be Without Open Source?
  • Memory lane: Microsoft blames Red Hat for not making Linux popular enough
  • Perspectives extension improves HTTPS security
  • Re: Switch to Ubuntu Linux not Apple Mac OS
  • Novell's identity management gets some open-source competition
  • Indian political party turns to FOSS
  • Mandriva and Turbolinux to Join Moblin Project to Expand Atom-Based Products
  • Linux Foundation Reports on First End User Summit
  • UK gains LPI affiliate
  • Firefox new tab page to change

OpenOffice.org 3.0 scores strong first week

Filed under
OOo

computerworld.com: OpenOffice.org 3.0 was downloaded 3 million times in its first week, with about 80% of the downloads by Windows users, an official with the group said in a blog post on Monday.

Worldwide 2009 Mandriva Linux Installfest

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com: In order to bring Linux to new users and present the new features and technologies available in Mandriva Linux 2009, Mandriva is mobilizing its network of Linux User Groups (LUGs) to coordinate a worldwide Installfest on November 22nd, November 2008.

Community vs. Commercial GNU/Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: You can categorize most GNU/Linux distributions as either community or commercial. Community-based distributions like Debian, Fedora, or CentOS are maintained largely by volunteers and donations of services or money, while commercial distributions like Suse, Red Hat, or Xandros are backed by a company and compete directly against proprietary operating systems such as Windows and OS X.

Open Source Is Far From Free

Filed under
OSS

law.com: In his highly acclaimed best seller, The World is Flat, Thomas Friedman hails open-sourcing as one of 10 "flatteners" of the world. Nevertheless, many enterprises have included open-source code in their proprietary software without fully understanding the risks.

Ubuntu 8.10 “Intrepid Ibex” feels more like a service pack than a new release

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogs.zdnet.com: With only ten days to go until Ubuntu 8.10 is released I decided to take a look at the latest beta to see what the new release has to offer. Oddly enough, “Intrepid Ibex” feels more like a service pack to me than a new release.

How much have you saved by using GNU/Linux?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: At a time when economic problems dog the world, people's thoughts generally turn to saving. It is not surprising, therefore, to find many technology writers beginning to recognise that GNU/Linux and other open source software can reduce the amount that companies spend on IT.

Mandriva 2009 on the Asus EeeBox

Filed under
MDV

eeextra.com: Every major distribution generates a lot of hype at launch, and the new Mandriva 2009 did not depart from the rule. After completing the installation, I have used the new system for a few days and would like to share my first impressions.

Review: Pioneer Dreambook Light IL1

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

polishlinux.org: Cheap notebooks with preinstalled Linux distributions conquer Western markets. Polish hardware distributors did notice it and one of them launched a new subnotebook in the Polish market. They call it: Airis I-Design IL-1 Nanobook.

10 reasons for switching to a different Linux distribution

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: Sooner or later, you’re going to get the urge to switch distributions — maybe for a change of pace or maybe out of more practical considerations. Here’s a look at some of the most common reasons users feel compelled to make that jump.

OpenOffice.org Base is No Microsoft Access Replacement

Filed under
OOo

eweek.com: The OpenOffice.org 3.0 desktop database application offers new features that make it better than previous versions, but it still lags behind what Microsoft Access offers. Among the key concerns is OpenOffice.org Base's limited filed support for Microsoft Access database files.

Fedora's Cobbler project to automate Linux deployments

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: While most members of the Fedora open source community have begun to develop new features for the next version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), over the past two years some have worked to simplify everyday systems administration tasks such as installing and provisioning servers over a network.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Quickly Convert Ogg Theora to Flash Video

  • Linux: Find and remove matching files
  • Take Screenshots in Xfce
  • Configure LVM in Mandriva Linux Free 2009
  • Resizing Logical Volume (LVM) on ext3
  • Emacs - Getting Paragraphs to Wrap Lines
  • Bash Script To Access Wikipedia
  • Linux setup default gateway with route command
  • Converting 2.35 Aspect Video to DVD

Canonical Expanding Online Store

Filed under
Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: Businesses don’t buy operating systems. They buy applications. With that fact in mind, Canonical is gradually expanding its online store for Ubuntu Linux applications.

Mandriva One 2009 fails to impress

Filed under
MDV

bitburners.com: Or does it just simply fail? I have always rated Mandriva’s releases highly, and the past year has been especially good for them as the 2008 and 2008.1 have been awesome releases. Therefore the expectations were high when I was loading the Mandriva One 2009 edition to my IBM Thinkpad.

9 Must-Have OpenOffice Extensions

Filed under
OOo

makeuseof.com: Like Firefox, OpenOffice also comes with extensions that you can use to improve its functionality. Here, we have tested all the extensions and sorted out those that are useful for everyday use. Some of them are for general use while some are only meant for Writer, Calc or Impress.

Switching from Windows to Linux, what you need to know

Filed under
Linux

benkevan.com: Since we are in touch economic times the most important question is “How much will this cost me”? The answer is nothing, zero, zilch or nada. I would go on the edge and say it may actually save you money. How?

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

GNOME: WebKit, Fleet Commander, Introducing deviced

  • On Compiling WebKit (now twice as fast!)
    Are you tired of waiting for ages to build large C++ projects like WebKit? Slow headers are generally the problem. Your C++ source code file #includes a few headers, all those headers #include more, and those headers #include more, and more, and more, and since it’s C++ a bunch of these headers contain lots of complex templates to slow down things even more. Not fun.
  • Fleet Commander is looking for a GSoC student to help us take over the world
    Fleet Commander has seen quite a lot of progress recently, of which I should blog about soon. For those unaware, Fleet Commander is an effort to make GNOME great for IT administrators in large deployments, allowing them to deploy desktop and application configuration profiles across hundreds of machines with ease through a web administration UI based on Cockpit. It is mostly implemented in Python.
  • Introducing deviced
    Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been heads down working on a new tool along with Patrick Griffis. The purpose of this tool is to make it easier to integrate IDEs and other tooling with GNU-based gadgets like phones, tablets, infotainment, and IoT devices. Years ago I was working on a GNOME-based home router with davidz which sadly we never finished. One thing that was obvious to me in that moment of time was that I’m not doing another large scale project until I had better tooling. That is Builder’s genesis, and device integration is what will make it truly useful to myself and others who love playing with GNU-friendly gadgets.

KDE: Usability & Productivity, AtCore , Krita

  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 6
  • AtCore takes to the pi
    The Raspberry Pi3 is a small single board computer that costs around $35 (USD). It comes with a network port, wifi , bt , 4 usb ports , gpio pins , camera port , a display out, hdmi, a TRRS for analog A/V out. 1GB of ran and 4 ~1GHz armv8 cores Inside small SOC. Its storage is a microSd card they are a low cost and low power device. The Touchscreen kit is an 800×480 display that hooks to the Gpio for touch and dsi port for video. To hold our hardware is the standard touch screen enclosure that often comes with the screen if you buy it in a kit.
  • Look, new presets! Another Krita 4 development build!
    We’ve been focusing like crazy on the Krita 4 release. We managed to close some 150 bugs in the past month, and Krita 4 is getting stable enough for many people to use day in, day out. There’s still more to be done, of course! So we’ll continue fixing issues and applying polish for at least another four weeks. One of the things we’re doing as well is redesigning the set of default brush presets and brush tips that come with Krita. Brush tips are the little images one can paint with, and brush presets are the brushes you can select in the brush palette or brush popup. The combination of a tip, some settings and a smart bit of coding! Our old set was fine, but it was based on David Revoy‘s earliest Krita brush bundles, and for Krita 4 we are revamping the entire set. We’ve added many new options to the brushes since then! So, many artists are working together to create a good-looking, useful and interesting brushes for Krita 4.

Software: GIMP, Spyder, SMPlayer

  • Five free photo and video editing tools that could save burning a hole in your pocket and take your creativity to the next level
    GIMP stands for the Gnu Image Manipulation Program and is the first word that people usually think about when it comes to free image editors. It’s a raster graphics editor, available on multiple platforms on PC. It has a similar interface to Photoshop: you have your tools on one side, there’s an option for your tool window and then you have your layers window on another side. Perhaps one of the most useful features of GIMP is the option of plugins. There is a wide database for them and there’s a plugin for almost any task you might need to carry out. GIMP is extremely extensive, and it’s the choice of the FOSS community, thanks to the fact that it’s also open source. However, there are also some disadvantages. For example, GIMP has no direct RAW support yet (you have to install a plugin to enable it, which means a split workflow). It also has quite a bit of a learning curve as compared to Photoshop or Lightroom.
  • Introducing Spyder, the Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment
    If you want to use Anaconda for science projects, one of the first things to consider is the spyder package, which is included in the basic Anaconda installation. Spyder is short for Scientific PYthon Development EnviRonment. Think of it as an IDE for scientific programming within Python.
  • SMPlayer 18.2.2 Released, Install In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Via PPA
    SMPlayer is a free media player created for Linux and Windows, it was released under GNU General Public License. Unlike other players it doesn't require you to install codecs to play something because it carries its own all required codecs with itself. This is the first release which now support MPV and some other features such as MPRIS v2 Support, new theme, 3D stereo filter and more. It uses the award-winning MPlayer as playback engine which is capable of playing almost all known video and audio formats (avi, mkv, wmv, mp4, mpeg... see list).

Funding: Ethereum and Outreachy

  • How Will a $100 Mln Grant Help Ethereum Scale?
    On Feb. 16, six large-scale Blockchain projects OmiseGo, Cosmos, Golem, Maker and Raiden, that have completed successful multi-million dollar initial coin offerings (ICOs) last year, along with Japanese venture capital firm Global Brain have created the Ethereum Community Fund (ECF), to fund projects and businesses within the Ethereum ecosystem.
  • Outreachy Is Now Accepting Applications For Their Summer 2018 Internships
    This week Google announced the participating organizations for GSoC 2018 for students wishing to get involved with open-source/Linux development. Also happening this week is the application period opened for those wishing to participate in the summer 2018 paid internship program.