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Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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MyahOS 3.0 Tech Demo 1 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Toward the end of last week the first tech demo for the upcoming MyahOS 3.0 was released. The Myah 3.0 Tech Demo 1 LiveCD is optimized for i686 systems and is built using the Linux-Live scripts and has a lot of new packages including the Linux 2.6.20.2 kernel, GCC 4.1.2, X.Org 7.2, and Xfce 4.4.

Linux Foundation Expands Membership

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation (LF), the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, has announced three new members who represent the increasing opportunity for Linux as it continues to mature on devices.

What Do You Love and Hate about Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

As Ubuntu is the best thing that happened to me in the last year or so (I was a Fedora user before), I will take a moment and write this article about it.

I’m Going Back To Windows

Filed under
Linux

No. Not me personally. It’s the threat that we, as Linux users and developers, hear constantly. It’s on the forums, mailing lists and IRC. These ridiculous threats, that if something in the Linux operating system is not fixed or handled to their liking, they’re running back to Windows. To me, it seems to be getting worse and worse.

Why Linux LiveCDs are Important? How Useful are They?

Filed under
Linux

There a plenty of linux live cd, check out frozentech.com, scroll down the list and you will see this line:

Currently displaying 315 LiveCD/DVDs

With various tools such as Kadischi, linux live script, Ubuntu Customization Kit etc, you can easily come out your own live cd. What you required is just the matter of time to fine tune and customized your software included in your live cd.

Pick a License, Any License

Filed under
OSS

I hate software licenses. When I read a software license, what I see is a bunch of officious, mind-numbing lawyerly doublespeak. Blah, blah, blah.. kill me now.

How to script songs lyrics retrieval

Filed under
HowTos

I recently wrote a simple bash script to incorporate a lyrics database into some of my music-handling scripts. I took advantage of one of the benefits of open source software by finding an existing application that performed this task and inspecting the code to see how the developers did it.

Installing Beryl On An Ubuntu Feisty Fawn Desktop With An ATI Radeon Graphic Card

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can install and configure Beryl on an Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) desktop with an ATI Radeon graphic card. With Beryl, you can make your desktop use beautiful 3D effects.

Quake 4 1.4.1 Beta Available

Filed under
Gaming

The Quake 4 1.4.1 Beta patch is now available for download. We hope everyone enjoys the new content, features and fixes!

Experimental Sugar SDK LiveCD

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

I have stopped producing the LiveCD development builds to save space and time it takes to get out the daily builds. They are set to be replaced by the SDK LiveCD builds which will be built less frequently, usually during major sugar API changes and along with the stable builds. The first one is now available at

http://olpc.download.redhat.com/olpc/streams/sdk/build1/livecd/

Open XML takes next step toward becoming a standard

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft 's bid to have its Open XML file format approved as an ISO standard took another step forward Monday when that organization put the measure on a voting ballot sent to its member countries.

Red Hat spreads virtualization

Filed under
Linux

One of Red Hat Inc.'s leading Canadian partners believes the latest version of the open source server will prove to be a boon for his firm. “It think it's going to be great,” Paul Kerr, president of Toronto's Scalar Decisions, said of the release this month of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5.0.

“I think it will mean a big impact for our business.”

Miguel, Mono and Microsoft

Filed under
OSS

A little over five months has gone by since the Microsoft-Novell deal was signed but some details still remain unknown.

Debates over GPLv3, Novell and Microsoft

Filed under
OSS

A post on OSNews regarding Novell's official response to the recent draft of the GPLv3 led to a discussion on the merits (or lack thereof) of the Novell-Microsoft deal. Not surprisingly, most respondents have a negative view of the agreement.

Defense kicks off open-source encryption program

Filed under
OSS

The Defense Department has launched a new program to encourage the use of open- source encryption software within DOD systems.

Software suspend under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Suspending a computer means to turn it off in a special way, so that when you power it on again it resumes what it was doing, like nothing had happend. There are two common ways of suspending a computer: suspending to RAM and suspending to disk.

Suspend to disk

11 Things You Haven't Seen Yet in Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

A lot of websites have jumped at the chance of showing you the latest pieces of Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn. But they all have focused on the same things, the very same features that Ubuntu has touted as being the staple of Feisty Fawn. Yet there's a lot more under the hood that really makes life in Feisty a lot easier.

Open source expert speaks out on GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

Mark Radcliffe joins us this week to give his expert opinion on the latest draft of GPLv3. Mark is a friend and one of the industry's premier IP attorneys, especially with open source licensing questions. He is outside counsel for the OSI and chairs Committee C in the GPLv3 drafting process.

In other words, he knows his stuff.

Memories of OS/2

Filed under
OS

OSNews reports that OS/2 is 20 years old today. Wow, that makes me feel ooooold. My first experience with OS/2 was the 2.0 version (I think) around the end of highschool. According to Wikipedia 2.0 was released in 1992, so that's about right. I think I remember going with Fred to go over to someone's house to copy it even (lots of floppy disks).

The Daylight Saving change: no savings, no point

Filed under
Misc

The US government's plan to boost energy savings by moving Daylight Saving Time forward by three weeks was apparently a waste of time and effort, as the technological foibles Americans experienced failed to give way to any measurable energy savings.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more