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Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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'Lame Duck challenge' met, so software is free

Filed under
Software

PR: The catastrophic cratering of the global economy, falling gas prices and President George W. Bush's recent executive activities have indirectly prompted Saint Paul gadfly software developers CodeWeavers, Inc., to provide free software for every American on Oct. 28, company officials reluctantly announced today.

11 secrets for lazy Linux cluster admins

Filed under
Linux

Discover how to reduce Linux cluster admin effort, regardless of number of nodes.

Netbooks: The Linux Trojan Horse

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

techradar.com: For better or worse, Linux has always had a reputation as being the geeks' OS. With netbooks, this isn't the case. Neither the Windows nor Linux systems on the market are really being sold as computers as such, but a handy device that people buy for specific functions.

Also: How many distros can a healthy netbook market stand?

Torvalds: Real quality means taking it personally

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: The Linux Foundation (LF) has posted a ten-minute video interview with kernel coordinator Linus Torvalds. Held during the Linux Foundation's recent Linux Kernel Summit, the interview reveals the Linux founder speaking out on issues ranging from kernel/userland interactions to why Linux has so many interfaces.

ubuntu, ubuntu, ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Shuttleworth: "I don't think anyone can make money from the Linux desktop."

  • Review: Ubuntu 8.10, 3G tethering works very well
  • Can the New Ubuntu Save You Money?
  • Canonical is not cash flow positive
  • Notes from Setting Up Ubuntu Server on Linode
  • Official 8.10 release news: where they messed up
  • Seen on campus: 2 Ubuntu Laptop Success Stories
  • Canonical may need 3-5 more years of funding
  • Ubuntu 8.10 due Thursday; profitability not so fast
  • Mark Shuttleworth and the Grand Linux Vision
  • New Ubuntu Initiatives
  • Help us test the Kubuntu 8.10 Candidate CDs

Could a Linux Gaming Console Ever Work?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ostatic.com: A few days ago, Kristin covered Envizions Computer Entertainment's announcement that it will deliver its EVO Linux-based gaming console on November 18th. She predicted that the announcment would probably stoke the long-standing fire surrounding whether Linux can ever be a viable gaming platform, and indeed it did.

Results of the 1st openSUSE Board Election

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: So the polls are closed now and all votes have been accounted for and confirmed valid, and we are now proud to announce the election results!

John Galt is dead or Linus shrugs

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet: John Galt is the lead character in Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged. Galt represents Rand’s ideal of objectivism, of free market absolutism and rule by those few who dominate the market. Linus is the anti-Galt.

Please Vote in our Latest Poll

Filed under
Site News

If you haven't yet, would you please vote in our latest poll submitted by bigbearomaha concerning your preferred Linux install media? I was wanting to use the results in an article, but there aren't nearly enough votes to be valid right now. Vote away!

Ubuntu: Vendors need to step up

Filed under
Ubuntu

theregister.co.uk: "Intrepid Ibex", distributed as Ubuntu 8.10, goes live today for distribution later this week, and the economic crunch certainly makes the Linux variant more compelling.

Also: Ubuntu goes more mobile with 8.10 release

Linux incognito part three: Windows Vista

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Here's how to skin Linux to give a Windows Vista appearance. You can help provide a familiar look and feel to your Windows-trained friends and family as you coax them towards Linux. Or you can enjoy the satisfaction of having something looking like Vista actually run with stability.

Opera Sings an Ode to Browsers Everywhere

Filed under
Software

blogs.nytimes: I have to confess, I haven’t paid much attention to Opera Software until recently. The Norwegian company has been an also-ran in the browser market for 13 years. On Friday, I had a chance to sit down with its co-founder and chief executive, Jon Stephenson von Tetzchner. I can’t say that I’m convinced that Opera is now poised to take the Web by storm.

5 Interesting Linux Distro Names

Filed under
Linux

yabblog.com: Debian? Ubuntu? Sidux? Pardus? Mepis? Gentoo? Whoa! Why are these Linux distros so strangely named? Why not name a OS simply - door, room or window? Although, Linux distros have very strange names but it is interesting to know, why they are called so?

Review: 64 Studio 2.x

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: 64 Studio is a Linux distribution built upon Debian with both 64 bit processors, and the designer in mind. It takes the best of Debian, strips out the unnecessary extras, then rebuilds it as a one stop shop for those doing everything from print to web design.

Ubuntu 8.10 - Comprehensive Review of 10 Main Features

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.taragana.com: Ubuntu, right from its release, has been a very popular open source operating system for Linux lovers around the world. With its new release (Ubuntu 8.10 codenamed Intrepid Ibex) due in just 3 days' time, the hype and speculations are really reaching their heights.

Innovation Week in Africa – Young business innovators are making money with Open Source.

Filed under
OSS

opensource.org: All through last week, I spent my time in Ghana at the Ghana-India Kofi Annan Center for Excellence in ICT ( AITI-KACE ) in Accra. It has been an incredibly refreshing experience for me, personally, and for the hundreds of students, developers, businesses, bankers and educators that are participating in the forum.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 276

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Editorial: Three versus Four

  • News: Ubuntu unveils Intrepid Ibex, Fedora finalises feature list, Mandriva coordinates worldwide install fest, openSUSE explains beta release process, DesktopBSD moves to KDE 4
  • Released last week: Debian GNU/Linux 4.0r5, PC-BSD 7.0.1
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 8.10, OpenBSD 4.4
  • New additions: AsteriskNOW
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Ubuntu 7.04 to 8.10 Benchmarks: Is Ubuntu Getting Slower?

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: With the release of Ubuntu 8.10 coming out later this week we decided to use this opportunity to explore how the performance of this desktop Linux operating system has evolved over the past few releases. We performed clean installations of Ubuntu 7.04, Ubuntu 7.10, Ubuntu 8.04, and Ubuntu 8.10 on a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 notebook and used the Phoronix Test Suite to run 35 tests on each release that covered nine different areas of the system.

Battle of the Thumb Drive Linux Systems

Filed under
Linux

lifehacker.com: These days, it only takes an increasingly-cheap USB thumb drive and a program like UNetbootin to create a portable Linux desktop you can run on any computer that can boot from a USB port. But check out the list of distributions UNetbootin can download and install—it's huge.

Four layout extensions for OpenOffice.org Writer

Filed under
OOo

linux.com: OpenOffice.org Writer is as much a desktop publishing program as a word processor. That fact, however, has yet to have much influence on the extensions created for Writer -- perhaps because most users prefer manual formatting to organizing themselves with page styles, templates, and other elements of document design. Still, extensions for layout are starting to appear.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks (and Proprietary Opera)

  • Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks Like Waterfox, Pale Moon, or Basilisk
    Mozilla Firefox is an open source project, so anyone can take its code, modify it, and release a new browser. That’s what Waterfox, Pale Moon, and Basilisk are—alternative browsers based on the Firefox code. But we recommend against using any of them.
  • Opera Says Its Next Opera Release Will Have the Fastest Ad Blocker on the Block
    Opera Software promoted today its upcoming Opera 52 web browser to the beta channel claiming that it has the faster ad blocker on the market compared to previous Opera release and Google Chrome. One of the key highlights of the Opera 52 release will be the improved performance of the built-in ad blocker as Opera claims to have enhanced the string matching algorithm of the ad blocker to make it open web pages that contain ads much faster than before, and, apparently than other web browsers, such as Chrome.

Graphics: Glxinfo, ANV, SPIR-V

  • Glxinfo Gets Updated With OpenGL 4.6 Support, More vRAM Reporting
    The glxinfo utility is handy for Linux users in checking on their OpenGL driver in use by their system and related information. But it's not often that glxinfo itself gets updated, except that changed today with the release of mesa-demos-8.4.0 as the package providing this information utility. Mesa-demos is the collection of glxinfo, eglinfo, glxgears, and utilities related to Mesa. With the Mesa-demos 8.4.0 it is predominantly glxinfo updates.
  • Intel ANV Getting VK_KHR_16bit_storage Support Wrapped Up
    Igalia's Jose Maria Casanova Crespo sent out a set of patches today for fixes that allow for the enabling of the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension within Intel's ANV Vulkan driver. The patches are here for those interested in 16-bit storage support in Vulkan. This flips on the features for storageBuffer16BitAccess, uniformAndStorageBuffer16BitAccess, storagePushConstant16 and the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension. This support is present for Intel "Gen 8" Broadwell graphics and newer. Hopefully the work will be landing in Mesa Git soon.
  • SPIR-V Support For Gallium3D's Clover Is Closer To Reality
    It's been a busy past week for open-source GPU compute with Intel opening up their new NEO OpenCL stack, Karol Herbst at Red Hat posting the latest on Nouveau NIR support for SPIR-V compute, and now longtime Nouveau contributor Pierre Moreau has presented his latest for SPIR-V Clover support. Pierre has been spending about the past year adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's "Clover" OpenCL state tracker. SPIR-V, of course, is the intermediate representation used now by OpenCL and Vulkan.

Security: Updates, Tinder, FUD and KPTI Meltdown Mitigation

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Tinder vulnerability let hackers [sic] take over accounts with just a phone number

    The attack worked by exploiting two separate vulnerabilities: one in Tinder and another in Facebook’s Account Kit system, which Tinder uses to manage logins. The Account Kit vulnerability exposed users’ access tokens (also called an “aks” token), making them accessible through a simple API request with an associated phone number.

  • PSA: Improperly Secured Linux Servers Targeted with Chaos Backdoor [Ed: Drama queen once again (second time in a week almost) compares compromised GNU/Linux boxes to "back doors"]
    Hackers are using SSH brute-force attacks to take over Linux systems secured with weak passwords and are deploying a backdoor named Chaos. Attacks with this malware have been spotted since June, last year. They have been recently documented and broken down in a GoSecure report.
  • Another Potential Performance Optimization For KPTI Meltdown Mitigation
    Now that the dust is beginning to settle around the Meltdown and Spectre mitigation techniques on the major operating systems, in the weeks and months ahead we are likely to see more performance optimizations come to help offset the performance penalties incurred by mitigations like kernel page table isolation (KPTI) and Retpolines. This week a new patch series was published that may help with KPTI performance.