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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 04 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 2010 Was a Big Linux Year srlinuxx 1 23/12/2010 - 12:08am
Story What if the whole world ran Linux? srlinuxx 2 23/12/2010 - 12:02am
Story Ubuntu Wayland: Shuttleworth's post-Mac makeover srlinuxx 2 22/12/2010 - 11:03pm
Story Soccer Cup Solitaire For GNU/Linux Released srlinuxx 22/12/2010 - 10:16pm
Story Big business better use open source srlinuxx 22/12/2010 - 10:14pm
Story Linux Mint 10 Review srlinuxx 1 22/12/2010 - 9:02pm
Story Top 10 Linux distributions srlinuxx 1 22/12/2010 - 9:01pm
Story Allegations of OpenBSD Backdoors May be True, Updated srlinuxx 1 22/12/2010 - 9:00pm
Story GTK+3 Now Uses X Input 2 By Default, New Back-End Caps srlinuxx 22/12/2010 - 8:03pm
Story Red Hat vs. Windows for server share: The battle just heating up srlinuxx 22/12/2010 - 6:06pm

Does an OS have to be costlier than the hardware on which it is run ?

Filed under
Linux

Does an OS have to be as costly or even more than the hardware on which it runs? This seems to be the question that I am forced to ponder myself again and again. When I open the day's newspaper, I am besieged by ad after ad offering to sell PCs at bargain prices, some of them as low as $250.

OS Users are Attack Dogs

Filed under
Misc

If there was one commonality to describe the "hardcore" users from all three computing platforms, it would have to be the fact that many of them spend too much time making excuses for their OS' inadequacies. When they're not doing this, they're hard at work poking and prodding their least favorite columnists.

NASA tests Linux-based planetary surface exploration robots

Filed under
Linux

A Linux-based NASA lunar rover is on maneuvers -- and Internet webcams -- this week in the Arizona desert near Meteor Crater. The K-10's maneuvers are related to a NASA project tasked with building extra-vehicular activity (EVA) hardware and developing EVA procedures for planetary surface exploration.

Give Linux one more chance -- this time you won't regret it

Filed under
Ubuntu

If you have an old PC lying around (or even a brand new one), this may be the time to give Linux another try. Yes, I know, you expect Linux, the free operating system developed by volunteers worldwide, to be nerdy and hard to use.

Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks by Rickford Grant

Filed under
Reviews

Sometimes I wonder what separates the geeks from the non-geeks. I’ve always assumed I fell into the geek category based on my job and the hours spent with computers on my own time. But, after reading Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks, I must not be much of a geek because I found this book to be quite interesting!

Create your own Planet

Filed under
HowTos

Major open source projects like GNOME, KDE, Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, and Apache all have something in common -- they all have Planet feed reader sites set up to aggregate developer blog feeds. The Planet software was developed to power Planet GNOME and Planet Debian, but now it's being used by dozens of open source projects. With just a few simple steps, you can set up a Planet aggregator to watch your favorite blogs or to help publicize your favorite project.

Bart Decrem Flocks off

Filed under
Software

THE FOUNDER Web browser outfit Flock seems to have quit the company and headed off in search of pastures new. Bart Decrem has stepped down as CEO and is looking to build another company.

Who are the Hacker Bloggers?

Filed under
Misc

In many ways, an open source project is just like a business. There is a product - admittedly one with a price tag of zero - serving customers; ideally, the managers, aka project leaders, would like more people to use that "product". So doesn't this imply that those in the open source "business" should be blogging away just like their commercial brothers and sisters?

Howto Install Java

Filed under
HowTos

While many distributions already have Java installed, several don't. Installing Java in Firefox or Mozilla is really quite an uncomplicated process, but can look daunting to a Noob.

Avoiding slow package updates with package diffs

Filed under
HowTos

If you're using the unstable or testing distribution of Debian GNU/Linux you will almost certainly have noticed that apt-get uses daily-diffs for its package updates. In many common situtations this is more bandwidth efficient, however it isn't always appropriate.

Mandriva 2007 Right Around the Corner?

Filed under
MDV

While folks were looking for a RC2 to be released today, news of the final being released to early seeders hits the Mandriva Club.

Mandriva powers up a serious business-server Linux

Filed under
MDV

Mandriva Linux, formerly Mandrake Linux, on Sept. 14 will ship a major upgrade to its business server-oriented Linux distribution. The company claims that Mandriva Corporate Server 4 is fully compliant with the LSB (Linux Standard Base), and therefore should have interoperability with products from other LSB-compliant vendors.

Gnome 2.16 and Debian

Filed under
News

Gnome 2.16 is out... so when will it hit Debian?

How to enable numlock at startup automatically in Gnome on CentOS?

Filed under
HowTos

CentOS is a great desktop, but unfortunately, the NUMLOCK key isn't enabled by default when you start your computer, which is annoying when you start typing numbers and you realise it doesn't work as expected.

Dell's AMD computers now available

Filed under
Hardware

Following Michael Dell's announcement yesterday, Dell today released configuration pages for its initial AMD-based systems this morning. The computers can be ordered now.

RHEL5 Beta1 Client: Astonishment (scratch, scratch...)

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

And it worked. The new RHEL5 Beta1, which is a public beta — so I could D/L and test it. Unfortunately for "them", I am not interested in Xen, so I don't even know if it works. I can say however that it looked speedy to me.

Linux-enabled ThinkPad

Filed under
Linux

At only an inch thin and just over 2 kg, the new Linux-supported ThinkPad T60p strikes the balance between productivity and portability, giving electronic design engineers the processor speeds and memory requirements necessary for industrial-strength applications such as computer aided design (CAD).

OOoBasic crash course: Replacement therapy

Filed under
HowTos

In a perfect world everyone would write in standard English and all publications would use a universal style guide. In the real world, however, you have to deal with different versions of English (British, American, Australian, etc.), and every publication has its own set of writing guidelines. If you write for several markets, things can get pretty complicated. But instead of wasting time on language idiosyncrasies, you can let an OOoBasic macro do the donkey work. Let's create a macro that converts from British English to US English. You can easily modify it later for other text conversion purposes.

Linux and tomato sauce: The cost of choice

Filed under
Linux

When a user decides to try Linux, they're overwhelmed with choices before, during, and after the installation. People don't want infinite choices. They sometimes want the ability to choose, but they rarely want to be forced to choose.

The Future of Hardware Compatibility Lists in Linux

Filed under
Linux

A while back, I made a comment with regard to how great it would be to have a single, collective HCL (hardware compatibility list) for all of the popular Linux distributions. At the time, I felt very strongly that if we had a one single collective database of hardware that was known to work with the latest distributions, life would be a lot easier.

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More in Tux Machines

Black Lab Brings Real-Time Kernel Patching to Its Enterprise Desktop 8 Linux OS

A few moments ago, Softpedia has been informed by Black Lab Software about the general availability of the sixth DP (Developer Preview) build of the upcoming Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 OS. Sporting a new kernel from the Linux kernel from the 4.2 series, Black Lab Linux Enterprise Desktop 8 Developer Preview 6 arrives today for early adopters and public beta testers with real-time kernel patching, which means that you won't have to reboot your Black Lab Linux Enterprise OS after kernel upgrades. "DP6 offers you a window into what's new and whats coming when Black Lab Enterprise Desktop and Black Lab Enterprise Desktop for Education is released. As with our other developer previews it also aids in porting your applications to the new environment," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO, Black Lab Software. Read more

USB stick brings neural computing functions to devices

Movidius unveiled a “Fathom” USB stick and software framework for integrating accelerated neural networking processing into embedded and mobile devices. On April 28, Movidius announced availability of the USB-interfaced “Fathom Neural Compute Stick,” along with an underlying Fathom deep learning software framework. The device is billed as “the world’s first embedded neural network accelerator,” capable of allowing “powerful neural networks to be moved out of the cloud, and deployed natively in end-user devices.” Read more

ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk

  • Open Source ImageMagick Security Bug Puts Sites at Risk
    ImageMagick, an open source suite of tools for working with graphic images used by a large number of websites, has been found to contain a serious security vulnerability that puts sites using the software at risk for malicious code to be executed onsite. Security experts consider exploitation to be so easy they’re calling it “trivial,” and exploits are already circulating in the wild. The biggest risk is to sites that allows users to upload their own image files. Information about the vulnerability was made public Tuesday afternoon by Ryan Huber, a developer and security researcher, who wrote that he had little choice but to post about the exploit.
  • Huge number of sites imperiled by critical image-processing vulnerability
    A large number of websites are vulnerable to a simple attack that allows hackers to execute malicious code hidden inside booby-trapped images. The vulnerability resides in ImageMagick, a widely used image-processing library that's supported by PHP, Ruby, NodeJS, Python, and about a dozen other languages. Many social media and blogging sites, as well as a large number of content management systems, directly or indirectly rely on ImageMagick-based processing so they can resize images uploaded by end users.
  • Extreme photo-bombing: Bad ImageMagick bug puts countless websites at risk of hijacking
    A wildly popular software tool used by websites to process people's photos can be exploited to execute malicious code on servers and leak server-side files. Security bugs in the software are apparently being exploited in the wild right now to compromise at-risk systems. Patches to address the vulnerabilities are available in the latest source code – but are incomplete and have not been officially released, we're told.

Canonical to Offer Snappy Ubuntu 16 Images for Raspberry Pi 2, DragonBoard 410c

As you may know (or not), the Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) is taking place these days, between May 3 and May 5, on the Ubuntu On Air channel, where the Ubuntu devs are laying down plans for the future. We've already reported the other day that the next major release of the popular Linux kernel-based operating system, Ubuntu 16.10, which has been dubbed by Canonical and Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth as Yakkety Yak, won't ship with the long-anticipated Unity 8 desktop interface as the default session. Read more