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Tuesday, 21 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Cygwin - a Unix Environment and Shell on Windows

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: If your daily routine means that you spend much of your time behind a Windows system, yet you love the power and flexibility of a Unix-based environment, you might want to compile some Linux/Unix software, so that it can run natively under Windows.

Six Things I Love About The Opera Browser

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: This isn’t just a list of Opera features, these are what genuinely make life easier for me, and what makes me want to use Opera for my daily web browsing. So for example I haven’t included Mouse Gestures with this list. Why? Because even though it is much more productive, I haven’t yet got in the habit of using it.

5 Most Popular Linux-hackable Gadgets

Filed under
Hardware

junauza.com: Linux is a powerful and versatile operating system that can be utilized to hack just about any electronic hardware device. To prove it, I have here a list of popular gadgets that are already known to run Linux.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 31

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: Issue #31 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: www.opensuse-tutorials.com, Pascal Bleser: Reporting Packman package bugs, and Jigish Gohil: New Compiz plugins.

Nifty tools for your Asus Eee PC

Filed under
Software

linux.com: It didn't take the enterprising community of Asus Eee PC users long to come up with some great tweaking tools for this Linux-based ultra-low-cost laptop. Just a few weeks after the official launch of Eee PC, the first tweaking utilities started to appear on the EeeUser forums.

various howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Mail server benchmarking with Postal

  • Networking with Ubuntu 8.04 and Windows, Part III
  • Commands you might have missed: tree
  • Make Ubuntu look like Vista, like Windows XP
  • A nice conky file, for all
  • Install NVIDIA 177.13 drivers on realtime kernel

More on Masterbaiting Monkeys

Filed under
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds: Don't glorify the security "monkeys"

  • What Linus Torvalds thinks about OpenBSD
  • Torvalds criticises the 'security circus'

KDE 4.1. The promise of a better future!

Filed under
KDE

it.toolbox.com/blogs: For the past week I have been exclusively using KDE4. I had read all the hype and flame wars so I decided to make up my own mind. To that effect I asked my Google eyed friend what to do and installed KDE4 from a third party repository. I did so with an open mind and with a zen like concentration that I learned from Grasshopper on a childhood television show.

Dansguardian w/ Multi-Group Filtering & Squid (Debian)

Filed under
HowTos

This how-to describes how to install and configure Dansguardian with multi-group filtering, Squid with NTLM auth, ipmasq, and dnsmasq to provide a full internet gateway solution for small to medium sized networks. This how-to requires two NICs in order to perform firewalling and transparent proxying.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • openSUSE Gets the JeOS

  • Automation computers run Linux
  • Why I Am Leaning Toward FreeBSD
  • Tilda: Dropping to the command line
  • Open Source Laptop Tracker
  • Open source college revolution?
  • Kernel Vulnerability in Ubuntu
  • Use open source to avoid jail and rescue your weekends
  • KTorrent vs Anti-Cheater
  • The Easy Way To Convert Binary To Decimal
  • Resize an LVM2 logical volume and the ext2 or ext3 filesystem
  • VLC gets a New Face
  • nice customized .bashrc file
  • Finding the name behind the GMail address
  • Gtk+ 3.0, take 2
  • OpenDomain.org owner: Selfless FOSS helper or domain squatter?
  • Triple Boot: Windows Vista, OpenSolaris 2008.05, and Ubuntu 8.04

Firefox 3.0.1 security and stability update now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing stability and security update process, Firefox 3.0.1 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. We strongly recommend that all Firefox users upgrade to this latest release.

Security Bugs and Full Disclosure

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: In an announcement for the 2.6.25.10 stable kernel, Greg KH noted, "it contains a number of assorted bugfixes all over the tree. And once again, any users of the 2.6.25 kernel series are STRONGLY encouraged to upgrade to this release."

Manage Your Photos with Kflickr

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: It’s a scene I’ve seen several times at the Central West End Linux Users Group I help run in St. Louis — a new visitor to the LUG brings her busted Windows machine to the meeting, finally sick enough of that OS to install Linux. But first we have to recover whatever data is still sitting on the hard drive (thank you, Knoppix!)

Judge Kimball Rules at Last

Filed under
Legal

groklaw.net: Judge Kimball rules in SCO v. Novell! I haven't read it yet myself, just quickly skimmed it enough to see that SCO owes Novell some money ($2,547,817 plus interest probably -- SCO can oppose -- from the Sun agreement) and it had no right to enter into the Sun agreement.

GIMP 2.5.2 Development Release

Filed under
GIMP

Getting closer to GIMP 2.6, the GIMP developers released another snapshot from the 2.5 development series. Some improvements include: added a dockable dialog for managing Color tool settings, allow to scroll beyond the image borders, and mark the center of rectangles/bounding rectangles during moves.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Understanding More, Less and Touch

  • How do I install and use fonts in Linux?
  • Installing WMware on Arch Linux
  • Improve system performance by moving your log files to RAM
  • Clean up your deb package management mess
  • The Kernel Boot Process
  • Nouveau nVidia drivers now available in Debian experimental
  • Commands you might have missed: watch
  • 10 step openSUSE 11 dvd installation
  • vim: lightning fast navigation in a large software project

KDE 4 problems highlight shift from community users to consumers

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: The reasons for the user revolt against KDE 4, which we reported on yesterday, are still being sorted out. Judging from the quickness and thoroughness with which KDE 4 was rejected, the audience for free software seems to have shifted from a small group of knowledgeable users that treasures innovation to a larger one that values convention and familiarity and is actively suspicious of change.

Linux for the kids: LinuxWorld Install Fest

Filed under
Linux

practical-tech.com: Over the last few years, LinuxWorld has become the trade show for Linux, the business, rather than Linux, the community. This year, the show will include a blast from the past as it will include a massive install-fest.

Managing a Practice with Linux

Filed under
Linux

lawtech.wordpress: There have been several posts here about Linux in the law office, both as a server environment and as a workstation. My main concern with it on the desktop has always been the lack of native Linux applications that would be needed for lawyers, such as time and billing, financials, and case management.

The Big X Window Manager Guide (with Screenshots)

Filed under
Software

internetling.com: As promised, today we’ll take a look at the various interesting window managers for the X Window System which aren’t (necessarily) a part of a certain desktop environment (that means Enlightenment DR 17 doesn’t count here people, sorry, please take a look at the desktop environment guide).

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today's howtos

Android Leftovers

7 tools for analyzing performance in Linux with bcc/BPF

A new technology has arrived in Linux that can provide sysadmins and developers with a large number of new tools and dashboards for performance analysis and troubleshooting. It's called the enhanced Berkeley Packet Filter (eBPF, or just BPF), although these enhancements weren't developed in Berkeley, they operate on much more than just packets, and they do much more than just filtering. I'll discuss one way to use BPF on the Fedora and Red Hat family of Linux distributions, demonstrating on Fedora 26. BPF can run user-defined sandboxed programs in the kernel to add new custom capabilities instantly. It's like adding superpowers to Linux, on demand. Examples of what you can use it for include: Read more