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Thursday, 21 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Elementary OS Freya 0.3 review Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 7:36pm
Story Evolving KDE: Lehman’s Laws of Software Evolution In The Community Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 7:27pm
Story How open source grew up Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 12:03pm
Story F2FS For Linux 4.1 Has New Features & Fixes Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 11:52am
Story GitHub: Now Supporting Open Source License Compliance Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 9:32am
Story Tanglu 3.0 Alpha Out Now Based on Debian 8 Jessie, Offers GNOME 3.16 and KDE Plasma 5 Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 3:35am
Story EXT4 In Linux 4.1 Adds File-System Level Encryption Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 3:29am
Story Manjaro Linux 0.8.13 Pre1 Released for Testing with KDE Plasma 5.2.2 and Xfce 4.12 Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 3:23am
Story Ardour 4.0 released Rianne Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 3:18am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 19/04/2015 - 12:00am

Linux device developers not weird, just mainstream

Filed under
Linux

theregister.co.uk: Developers putting Linux on consumer devices aren't weirdos mining a niche, according to the Intel man who last year volunteered to help maintain embedded Linux.

Supporting Linux in the Microsoft Enterprise

Filed under
Linux

daileymuse.com: Linux adoption in the enterprise data center continues to grow in terms of both numbers of servers and the variety of roles Linux occupies. As these deployments become more pervasive in the enterprise so too does the need for the integration and interoperability.

Does Uptime still matter?

ducea.com: When I started working as a sysadmin (about 10 years ago) there was this obsession about uptime. Everyone considered this the greatest sign that you are doing a good job as a sysadmin if you were able ‘to keep the machine running’ for a long time.

How much legal trouble is Cisco in against the FSF?

Filed under
Legal

blogs.zdnet.com: A new Law.Com analysis indicates Cisco may be in big legal trouble over the FSF lawsuit alleging it misused open source code in its hardware. Until you learn the rest of the story.

Is Linux ready to go to FAT camp?

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch.com: The talking drums keep rumbling throughout the Linux jungle as the tuxified ones ponder the impact of Dutch personal navigation device (PND) vendor TomTom agreeing to terms after being sued by Microsoft.

Mandriva 2009.1 RC2 Screenshot Tour

Filed under
MDV

softpedia.com: Mandriva announced last night the immediate availability of Mandriva Linux 2009.1 RC2. Once again, we thought it would be nice to offer a visual tour of this second release candidate of the upcoming Mandriva 2009 Spring.

Intel Core i7 On Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: By now most of you should be familiar with the Core i7 processor family, which is based upon Intel's Nehalem architecture. The current Core i7 processor selection includes the 920, 940, and 965 Extreme Edition.

The Perfect Server - Ubuntu 8.10 [ISPConfig 3]

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

Red Hat Dismisses Consumer Desktop Linux (Again)

workswithu.com: Sometimes, you have to respect someone for sticking to an opinion and a vision. Other times, you have to wonder if a consistent vision becomes a fatal flaw. I’m still undecided about whether Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst has the correct — or flawed — long term vision.

Some not so wobbly news from wobblyland

Filed under
KDE

martin-graesslin.com/blog: Long time no post on what has changed in KWin lately. So I’m going to show you some new features.

GPL's cloudy future

Filed under
OSS

Jeremy Allison: One of the things about getting older is that you learn to ignore things until you have to do something about them. It’s a learned efficiency, I suppose. I finally realized I have to do some serious thinking about cloud computing.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Fonera 2.0 powered by Linux

  • Linux fails to meet the needs of real users
  • My Sysadmin Toolbox
  • Nokia to release a netbook?
  • A Free Software Thesis
  • Frictional Games' Unknown Teaser
  • LH Strip #3: Mark Shuttleworth Names Other OS
  • Firefox hits 35% market share in Europe, 22% globally
  • Phoronix Test Suite 1.8 Delivers New Automated Testing Capabilities
  • Debian, Gentoo, FreeBSD, GNU/kFreeBSD
  • Ubuntu Linux Preps Newest Version
  • Cherokee: Why it could own the Internet
  • NVIDIA's Release Happiness Continues Into April
  • More Pictures Of Computer Disasters
  • Defending Novell On Wall Street
  • Diagramming with Dia

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Clearing The Contents Of A File

  • FreeBSD commands for Gentoo users — and reverse
  • YUM repo errors
  • Using encrypted filesystems with Linux Logical Volume Manager
  • Creating a Ringtone with Audacity
  • How to clone virtual machines in VMware Server
  • Testing SMTP servers with SWAKS
  • Line wrapping text made easy with fold
  • Creation and Maintenance of a Gentoo Backup
  • Print a Web Page From a Shell Prompt
  • OOo: Using Data Form extension to enter information in spreadsheets
  • Genisoimage - Creates ISO-9660 CD-ROM filesystem images

Linux Fest NorthWest is coming!

Filed under
Linux

lunduke.com: totem350Linux Fest NorthWest is happening April 25th and 26th (Saturday and Sunday) in Bellingham, WA. If you are a Linux nerd and you can find your way to Bellingham, I highly recommend it.

Ubuntu 9.04: What’s New for Desktop Users?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: With Ubuntu 9.04, otherwise known as the Jaunty Jackalope, set to be released in less than three weeks, we begin with a look at the new features that Jaunty brings to traditional desktops.

Review: Debian 5: Lenny

Filed under
Linux

ericsbinaryworld.com: Debian…the father and grandfather of many a Linux distro. I think indirectly Debian is probably running on more computers than any other Linux distro. It’s the basis of Ubuntu, Mepis, Xandros, and many others. And many people use Debian where they need a nice, stable distro.

Revisiting Linux: An Evening With Zombies and Ubuntu Linux 9.04 Beta

Filed under
Ubuntu

jamesdurham.com: I love Linux. It is a fantastic operating system/platform with ridiculous power and flexibility, and I wish I could use it for all my computer needs. I’ve attempted to do just about everything with it, and try as I might, there are some areas where it just doesn’t fill what I need with my creative work.

Are Linux netbooks really returned more often than Windows models?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
Microsoft

computerworld.com: Microsoft says that Windows dominates -- and will continue to dominate -- netbooks because customers are looking for a familiar, PC-like experience, as well as compatibility with their peripherals and software such as Microsoft Office.

Also: Netbooks forward or backward, Linux or Windows

Announcing the “We’re Linux” video contest finalists

Filed under
Linux

linux-foundation.org: The journey that begin during last football season with the realization that Microsoft paid Jerry Seinfeld $10 million for his appearance in their ads is almost over. The judging for the We’re Linux video contest has been completed and I’m pleased to announce the finalists.

GNOME begins to play catch up with KDE

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: The GNOME project has released what it calls a roadmap towards version 3.0. After following a policy that mandated minor changes in its six-monthly releases, GNOME has decided that it would be a mistake to release 3.0 without a "user-visible change."

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel Coverage at LWN (Outside Paywall Now)

  • XArray and the mainline
    The XArray data structure was the topic of the final filesystem track session at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM). XArray is a new API for the kernel's radix-tree data structure; the session was led by Matthew Wilcox, who created XArray. When asked by Dave Chinner if the session was intended to be a live review of the patches, Wilcox admitted with a grin that it might be "the only way to get a review on this damn patch set". In fact, the session was about the status of the patch set and its progress toward the mainline. Andrew Morton has taken the first eight cleanup patches, Wilcox said, which is great because there was a lot of churn there. The next set has a lot of churn as well, mostly due to renaming. The 15 patches after that actually implement XArray and apply it to the page cache. Those could be buggy, but they pass the radix-tree tests so, if they are, more tests are needed, he said.
  • Filesystem test suites
    While the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM) filesystem track session was advertised as being a filesystem test suite "bakeoff", it actually focused on how to make the existing test suites more accessible. Kent Overstreet said that he has learned over the years that various filesystem developers have their own scripts for testing using QEMU and other tools. He and Ted Ts'o put the session together to try to share some of that information (and code) more widely. Most of the scripts and other code has not been polished or turned into a project, Overstreet continued. Bringing new people up to speed on the tests and how they are run takes time, but developers want to know how to run the tests before they send code to the maintainer.
  • Messiness in removing directories
    In the filesystem track at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM), Al Viro discussed some problems he has recently spotted in the implementation of rmdir(). He covered some of the history of that implementation and how things got to where they are now. He also described areas that needed to be checked because the problem may be present in different places in multiple filesystems. The fundamental problem is a race condition where operations can end up being performed on directories that have already been removed, which can lead to some rather "unpleasant" outcomes, Viro said. One warning, however: it was a difficult session to follow, with lots of gory details from deep inside the VFS, so it is quite possible that I have some (many?) of the details wrong here. Since LSFMM there has been no real discussion of the problem and its solution on the mailing lists that I have found.
  • Handling I/O errors in the kernel
    The kernel's handling of I/O errors was the topic of a discussion led by Matthew Wilcox at the 2018 Linux Storage, Filesystem, and Memory-Management Summit (LSFMM) in a combined storage and filesystem track session. At the start, he asked: "how is our error handling and what do we plan to do about it?" That led to a discussion between the developers present on the kinds of errors that can occur and on ways to handle them. Jeff Layton said that one basic problem occurs when there is an error during writeback; an application can read the block where the error occurred and get the old data without any kind of error. If the error was transient, data is lost. And if it is a permanent error, different filesystems handle it differently, which he thinks is a problem. Dave Chinner said that in order to have consistent behavior across filesystems, there needs to be a definition of what that behavior should be. There is a need to distinguish between transient and permanent failures and to create a taxonomy of how to deal with each type.
  • 4.18 Merge window, part 1
    As of this writing, 7,515 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline repository for the 4.18 merge window. Things are clearly off to a strong start. The changes pulled this time around include more than the usual number of interesting new features; read on for the details.
  • Year-2038 work in 4.18
    We now have less than 20 years to wait until the time_t value used on 32-bit systems will overflow and create time-related mayhem across the planet. The grand plan for solving this problem was posted over three years ago now; progress since then has seemed slow. But quite a bit of work has happened deep inside the kernel and, in 4.18, some of the first work that will be visible to user space has been merged. The year-2038 problem is not yet solved, but things are moving in that direction. If 32-bit systems are to be able to handle times after January 2038, they will need to switch to a 64-bit version of the time_t type; the kernel will obviously need to support applications using that new type. Doing so in a way that doesn't break existing applications is going to require some careful work, though. In particular, the kernel must be able to successfully run a system where applications have been rebuilt to use a 64-bit time_t, but ancient binaries stuck on 32-bit time_t still exist; both applications should continue to work (though the old code may fail to handle times correctly). The first step is to recognize that most architectures already have support for applications running in both 64-bit and 32-bit modes in the form of the compatibility code used to run 32-bit applications on 64-bit systems. At some point, all systems will be 64-bit systems when it comes to time handling, so it makes sense to use the compatibility calls for older applications even on 32-bit systems. To that end, with 4.18, work has been done to allow both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the time-related system calls to be built on all architectures. The CONFIG_64BIT_TIME configuration symbol controls the building of the 64-bit versions on 32-bit systems, while CONFIG_COMPAT_32BIT_TIME controls the 32-bit versions.

today's leftovers

GNOME 3.29.3 Released

  • GNOME 3.29.3 released
    GNOME 3.29.3 is now available. This release is primarily notable in that all modules are buildable in this release, which is historically very rare for our development releases. This is an accomplishment! I hope we can keep this up going forward.
  • GNOME 3.29.3 Released As The Latest Step Towards GNOME 3.30
    GNOME 3.29.3 is out today as the latest development release in the road to this September's GNOME 3.30 desktop update. Highlights of the incorporated GNOME changes over the past few weeks include: - Epiphany 3.29.3 and its many notable improvements already covered on Phoronix from a reader mode to disabling NPAPI plugins by default.

Android Leftovers