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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mageia, Mandriva and IBM: Battle of Giants srlinuxx 04/10/2011 - 8:02pm
Story The new Novell srlinuxx 04/10/2011 - 7:56pm
Story Official Oneiric T-Shirts Appear in Ubuntu Shop srlinuxx 04/10/2011 - 5:44pm
Story The current (and poor) state of Firefox srlinuxx 04/10/2011 - 5:38pm
Story KDE to Say Buh-Bye to Screensavers srlinuxx 1 04/10/2011 - 5:17pm
Story Fedora 16: Linux home for lost Ubuntu GNOMEs srlinuxx 04/10/2011 - 4:27pm
Story Installing Nginx With PHP5 (And PHP-FPM) And MySQL Support On Fedora 15 falko 04/10/2011 - 7:26am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 04/10/2011 - 7:20am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 04/10/2011 - 7:09am
Story Kernel.org is back srlinuxx 04/10/2011 - 7:01am

Ubuntu: Who Needs Vista?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Back in my university days, when Netscape was the latest web browser on the scene and the Pentium MMX was the power user’s processor of choice, UNIX was part of my everyday life. Since graduating, my chosen desktop operating system has been Windows of some variety.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 197

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

Browser aims to open up the web

Filed under
Moz/FF

The key developers behind forthcoming changes to the Firefox browser reveal their plans for how the popular program will change.

The difference between online and offline, the web and the desktop will blur in the near future, Mozilla's Mike Schroepfer has said.

Debian Etch: first impressions

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Debian deserves some extra attention. The latest release is being distributed and I have no doubt that it will be installed on quite a few machines over the coming days and weeks. Personally I want to try it on the iMac Indigo and on a virtual machine under VMware. The netinstal images were a breeze to download and that was enough for now.

Mandriva Spring 2007.1 Releases to Early Seeders

Filed under
MDV

Comme supposé hier soir, l'heure des Early Seeders est arrivée !

Trop tard pour moi, le coffre de la voiture est déjà plein. Les enfants sont installés. Il ne manque plus que le conducteur Smile

A bientôt.

More Here.

The Linux Foundation Announces LSB Update and New Testing Tools

Filed under
Linux

The Linux Foundation has announced an update of the Linux Standard Base (LSB) and the release of a new testing toolkit. The update to LSB 3.1 introduces new automated testing toolkits for distributions and application vendors, linking development more closely to certification.

Bandwidth monitoring with vnStat

Filed under
HowTos

If you want to monitor and manage your Internet bandwidth, perhaps to make sure your ISP is not overbilling you, try vnStat, an open source, Linux-based application that gives you a clear picture of your bandwidth usage. This command-line application is simple to install and easy to use.

Firefox captures users with its add-on tools

Filed under
Moz/FF

Tens of millions of Internet users have switched to the Firefox Web browser, often for its protection from scammers and spyware writers who generally tailor their coded mischief for Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser.

But security isn't the only virtue to Firefox.

Mozilla: Why Desktop E-Mail Crucifies the Browser

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

In an era when applications are moving into the web browser, the maker of the world's most popular open-source e-mail client wants you to stay on the desktop. Later this month, Mozilla will release Thunderbird 2, the latest version of its cross-platform e-mail application. The current version, 1.5, has almost 50 million users worldwide and has been translated into 35 languages.

This Week's KDE Commit-Digest

Filed under
KDE
-s

This week in the KDE Commit-Digest we find some really nice goodies. Of course there are plenty of the less glamorous but quite necessary commits as well. All together, things are proceding along at an exciting pace.

Brasero does the CD burning job in GNOME

Filed under
Software

My system76 desktop machine came with a CD-RW/DVD-RW drive that I’ve finally got around to trying out. I wasn’t too concerned about how it would work with GNU/Linux, since I suspected CD and DVD burning should be relatively well-supported by now. Of course, you never know until you try.

openSUSE Linux : Helping the world avoid unnecessary agony

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

My brother and I presented our father with a new AMD Athlon 64 X2 Dual Core 3800+ machine that we got him for his birthday. He was excited and surprised, which came as no surprise.

Gaim nicer notifications with libnotify on Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy

Filed under
HowTos

Gaim (now renamed to Pidgin, but the version I’m using isn’t that new) comes with a “guifications” plugin to do “notifications”, those little popup “toast” messages to tell you that someone’s messaged you, someone’s logged on or off, all that sort of thing.

How To Build A New Freetype

Filed under
HowTos

I've had several requests for my RPM for freetype2 including sub-pixel rendering for openSUSE 10.2. So here are instructions on how to build your own, including my modified SPEC file. If you're in the USA it might be illegal to download my file, so this file is only for people who live in free countries. Or at least semi-free countries, like the UK.

1. Download freetype2 source rpm

Disabling unused daemons to speed up your boot sequence

Filed under
HowTos

Many Linux distros usually start a lot of daemons when booting, resulting in a long wait before you can get to work after powering on your machine. Some of those daemons are rarely used (or even not al all) by the majority of users. This tutorial describes how to disable unused or rarely used daemons in a proper way, resulting in faster boot sequences and less CPU load.

debug a currently running program with GDB

Filed under
HowTos

Here is a quick tips of GDB. There is a time when I was working on a module that was written in c/c++ hangs in the middle of execution. I have no clue how it happens, and it happens quite rare. I keep guessing and try to feed in more debug print lines to search for the cause of the hangs. Spend few days with no luck, but suddenly I thought of GDB.

Upgrade Debian Sarge to Debian Etch

Filed under
HowTos

Before upgrading your system, it is strongly recommended that you make a full backup, or at least back up any data or configuration information you can’t afford to lose. The upgrade tools and process are quite reliable, but a hardware failure in the middle of an upgrade could result in a severely damaged system

I'm JADed !

Filed under
Linux

In my apparently never-ending quest to revive and refresh my aging 32-bit box I decided to try installing the JAD (JackLab Audio Distribution) system. To recapitulate the source of woe with this particular machine, I'll remind readers that its PS2 ports are physically damaged, forcing me to switch my mouse and keyboard to the USB ports (the problem has something to do with the HID module).

Debian Just Died

Filed under
Linux

Sam Hocevar was elected the new DPL: Debian Project Leader Election 2007 Results.

It's useless to ask "how many voted for Sam", because the Debian elections are using an advanced Condorcet voting system with Schwartz Sequential Dropping, to guarantee that the winner is the candidate that is the less hated, if I am allowed to put it this way.

Review of SimplyMepis 6.5

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Here we are again, another day and another newly released distro. This time I'm investigating the popular SimplyMepis 6.5 which seems to have a thriving community and a strong base of supporters so it seems only right to give this new release the normal treatement.

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More in Tux Machines

Proxmox VE 4.3 released

Proxmox Server Solutions GmbH today announced the general availability of Proxmox Virtual Environment 4.3. The hyper-converged open source server virtualization solution enables users to create and manage LXC containers and KVM virtual machines on the same host, and makes it easy to set up highly available clusters as well as to manage network and storage via an integrated web-based management interface. The new version of Proxmox VE 4.3 comes with a completely new comprehensive reference documentation. The new docu framework allows a global as well as contextual help function. Proxmox users can access and download the technical documentation via the central help-button (available in various formats like html, pdf and epub). A main asset of the new documentation is that it is always version specific to the current user’s software version. Opposed to the global help, the contextual help-button shows the user the documentation part he currently needs. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • New Open Source Linux Ransomware Divides Infosec Community
    Following our investigation into this matter, and seeing the vitriol-filled reaction from some people in the infosec community, Zaitsev has told Softpedia that he decided to remove the project from GitHub, shortly after this article's publication. The original, unedited article is below.
  • Fax machines' custom Linux allows dial-up hack
    Party like it's 1999, phreakers: a bug in Epson multifunction printer firmware creates a vector to networks that don't have their own Internet connection. The exploit requirements are that an attacker can trick the victim into installing malicious firmware, and that the victim is using the device's fax line. The firmware is custom Linux, giving the printers a familiar networking environment for bad actors looking to exploit the fax line as an attack vector. Once they're in that ancient environment, it's possible to then move onto the network to which the the printer's connected. Yves-Noel Weweler, Ralf Spenneberg and Hendrik Schwartke of Open Source Training in Germany discovered the bug, which occurs because Epson WorkForce multifunction printers don't demand signed firmware images.
  • Google just saved the journalist who was hit by a 'record' cyberattack
    Google just stepped in with its massive server infrastructure to run interference for journalist Brian Krebs. Last week, Krebs' site, Krebs On Security, was hit by a massive distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack that took it offline, the likes of which was a "record" that was nearly double the traffic his host Akamai had previously seen in cyberattacks. Now just days later, Krebs is back online behind the protection of Google, which offers a little-known program called Project Shield to help protect independent journalists and activists' websites from censorship. And in the case of Krebs, the DDoS attack was certainly that: The attempt to take his site down was in response to his recent reporting on a website called vDOS, a service allegedly created by two Israeli men that would carry out cyberattacks on behalf of paying customers.
  • Krebs DDoS aftermath: industry in shock at size, depth and complexity of attack
    “This attack didn’t stop, it came in wave after wave, hundreds of millions of packets per second,” says Josh Shaul, Akamai’s vice president of product management, when Techworld spoke to him. “This was different from anything we’ve ever seen before in our history of DDoS attacks. They hit our systems pretty hard.” Clearly still a bit stunned, Shaul describes the Krebs DDoS as unprecedented. Unlike previous large DDoS attacks such as the infamous one carried out on cyber-campaign group Spamhaus in 2013, this one did not use fancy amplification or reflection to muster its traffic. It was straight packet assault from the old school.
  • iOS 10 makes it easier to crack iPhone back-ups, says security firm
    INSECURITY FIRM Elcomsoft has measured the security of iOS 10 and found that the software is easier to hack than ever before. Elcomsoft is not doing Apple any favours here. The fruity firm has just launched the iPhone 7, which has as many problems as it has good things. Of course, there are no circumstances when vulnerable software is a good thing, but when you have just launched that version of the software, it is really bad timing. Don't hate the player, though, as this is what Elcomsoft, and what Apple, are supposed to be doing right. "We discovered a major security flaw in the iOS 10 back-up protection mechanism. This security flaw allowed us to develop a new attack that is able to bypass certain security checks when enumerating passwords protecting local (iTunes) back-ups made by iOS 10 devices," said Elcomsoft's Oleg Afonin in a blog post.
  • After Tesla: why cybersecurity is central to the car industry's future
    The news that a Tesla car was hacked from 12 miles away tells us that the explosive growth in automotive connectivity may be rapidly outpacing automotive security. This story is illustrative of two persistent problems afflicting many connected industries: the continuing proliferation of vulnerabilities in new software, and the misguided view that cybersecurity is separate from concept, design, engineering and production. This leads to a ‘fire brigade approach’ to cybersecurity where security is not baked in at the design stage for either hardware or software but added in after vulnerabilities are discovered by cybersecurity specialists once the product is already on the market.

Ofcom blesses Linux-powered, open source DIY radio ‘revolution’

Small scale DAB radio was (quite literally) conceived in an Ofcom engineer’s garden shed in Brighton, on a Raspberry Pi, running a full open source stack, in his spare time. Four years later, Ofcom has given the thumbs up to small scale DAB after concluding that trials in 10 UK cities were judged to be a hit. We gave you an exclusive glimpse into the trials last year, where you could compare the specialised proprietary encoders with the Raspberry Pi-powered encoders. “We believe that there is a significant level of demand from smaller radio stations for small scale DAB, and that a wider roll-out of additional small scale services into more geographic areas would be both technically possible and commercially sustainable,” notes Ofcom. Read more