Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 16 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Top 10 Reasons I am converting from Microsoft to Linux

Filed under
Linux

gaycheckml: All the problems I have been having with Windows, Adobe products and cost of upkeep I have been playing and testing Ubuntu as a workstation and server.

Dell and Ubuntu: Still in the Closet

Filed under
Ubuntu

thefoulfish: I’ve been planning on getting a new PC, and figured I should check out the new Ubuntu PCs over at Dell. Dell started selling Ubuntu desktops not long ago, but the relationship kind of reminds me of a secret affair. Dell and Microsoft are still together, but Dell likes to hop in bed with Ubuntu occasionally. Of course, Ubuntu gets the short end of the stick because Dell is only leading them on.

Why Is PCLinuxOS 2007 Better Than Ubuntu ?

Filed under
PCLOS

pkblogs.com: I am one of Linux enthusiast like you people, and have used almost all major Linux distros in past. I am very impressed with PCLOS 2k7, even more than i was with Ubuntu. So here it goes as if why PCLOS 2k7 is better than Ubuntu :

An Exciting (open)SUSE Week

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers: This week was so filled with events and news that it easily qualifies for the most exciting openSUSE week yet: On Monday the rush until feature and version freeze of openSUSE 10.3 started in the evening. The Final Draft of the openSUSE Guiding Principles was posted. The announcements that both Lenovo and Dell will start to pre-load SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop and offer support.

Linux: Continuing 2.6.20.y -stable

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Greg KH and Chris Wright have been maintaining a -stable 2.6.x.y patchset for the 2.6.x and 2.6.(x-1) kernels since March of 2005. Thus, with the current stable release being 2.6.22, they maintain -stable patches for 2.6.22 and 2.6.21.

The open-source community's double standard on MySQL

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Deja vu. Remember 2002? That's when Red Hat decided to split its code into Red Hat Advanced Server (now Red Hat Enterprise Linux) and Fedora. Howls of protest and endless hand-wringing ensued: How dare Red Hat not give everything away to freeriders everywhere? Enter 2007.

Linux World - Real World Success Story in the Making

Filed under
Linux

velocitywebdev: I had the opportunity to meet a lot of people at Linux World. One really caught my attention to a lot of problems that our education system faces today. In particular, inner city schools, or schools that are deprived of some of the things middle to upper class schools experience.

Big business on free software

Filed under
OSS

monitor.co.ug: Software costs money. Some people avoid this cost initially by slyly using an unauthorized version, or what is called pirated software. Ugandan businesses don't love Linux. The most efficient way to immediately migrate to Linux is to contact a Linux-friendly company, such as Red Hat or Novell.

Half-Life 2: Deathmatch on Linux

Filed under
Gaming
HowTos

kahvipapu.com blogs: The original single player Half-Life 2 runs fine with Wine, even HL2DM runs fine when playing locally. But joining online game always crashed it. Gladly, someone came up with a solution! Wine has lately improved by amazing leaps, even DirectX support is nowadays pretty good.

Vista and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

BlindConfidential: For the past couple of weeks I’ve also been running VMWare and a Ubuntu distribution of the cap Linux operating environments. I’m enjoying being back in a UNIX environment for the first time in many years.

Automaker Peugeot Converts 20,000 Desktops To Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Information Week: Peugeot is planning to give Linux desktops to a wide variety of computer users, including sales force workers and workers on the manufacturing floor.

Running AMD64 Ubuntu Feisty Fawn (7.04) on an Asus P5N32-E SLI

Filed under
Ubuntu

tracylogan.com: One of the primary needs I have when shopping for a new motherboard is, like all right-thinking people, whether it will work well under Linux. Unfortunately, it's also relatively difficult to find out that information -- the manufacturers don't bother, the review sites rarely mention it, and even the Linux hardware sites are skewed by human nature: Most people only post about problems, not successes. Not so with this post!

Mozilla Aims To Warn Users About Dangerous Sites

Filed under
Moz/FF

information week: With the number of malicious Web pages mushrooming over the past several months, the Mozilla Foundation is looking to help users defend themselves. Window Snyder, who is Mozilla's "chief security something-or-other," says the company is taking a two-pronged approach.

Make your windows stay on top, toggle it

Filed under
HowTos

linux by example: Do you wish to have a shortcut way to make your window stay on top and toggle it after without needing it anymore ? Any EWMH compatible Windows Manager(WM) may support it, WM such as GNOME (metacity), fluxbox, xfce, compiz, beryl etc.

How to Convert chm files to HTML or PDF files

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu geek: CHM files, known as Microsoft Compressed HTML Help files, are a common format for eBooks and online documentation. It is a proprietary format for online help files, developed by Microsoft and first released in 1997 as a successor to the Microsoft WinHelp format.

The 'spirit' of open source, now invoked

Filed under
OSS

beranger: Besides the legal aspects of the GPL, some believe there should be a 'spirit' of it too. When I criticized some other projects or companies for not acting in the spirit of the open source, I was ridiculed. Now, this MySQL developer is definitely right.

Slackware Package Management

Filed under
HowTos

tech-articles: Following commands are available in slackware to work with packages.

CompizFusion: ***Updated guide for Ubuntu 7.04***

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: This guide is about as “official” as a 3rd party how-to can get. Amaranth is the Compiz Developer and Maintainer for Ubuntu.

Grandmom’s guide to Linux/Ubuntu: Iso and DAA and Duh, oh my

Filed under
Ubuntu

bloggernews.net: When last we left our intrepid grandmother, she was watching NBC nightly news via MIRO (aka democracy player). So what is next?

Microsoft loses key U.S. OpenXML vote

Filed under
OSS

InfoWorld: Microsoft has lost a key vote in its quest to develop an alternative to the Open Document Format standard, backed by the open-source community.

Also: U.S. org set to vote against Open XML's approval in ISO... this time

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Project launches updated Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 with bug fixes
    An updated version of Debian, a popular Linux distribution is now available for users to download and install. According to the post on the Debian website by Debian Project, the new version is 8.7. This is the seventh update to the Debian eight distribution, and the update primarily focuses on fixing bugs and security problems. This update also includes some adjustments to fix serious problems present in the previous version.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2016
    The number of sponsored hours did not increase but a new silver sponsor is in the process of joining. We are only missing another silver sponsor (or two to four bronze sponsors) to reach our objective of funding the equivalent of a full time position.
  • APK, images and other stuff.
    Also, I was pleased to see F-droid Verification Server as a sign of F-droid progress on reproducible builds effort - I hope these changes to diffoscope will help them!
  • Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Gets a Beta Release, Ships with KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS
    After landing on the official download channels a few days ago, the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Edition operating system got today, January 16, 2017, an official announcement. The KDE Edition is the last in the new Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" stable series to be published, and it was delayed a little bit because Clement Lefebvre and his team wanted it to ship with latest KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment from the Kubuntu Backports PPA repository.
  • Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 — Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu In One ISO
    Linux AIO is a multiboot ISO carrying different flavors of a single Linux distribution and eases you from the pain of keeping different bootable USBs. The latest Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 is now available for download in both 64-bit and 32-bit versions. It features various Ubuntu flavors including Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu.

Top Ubuntu Editing Apps: Image, Audio, Video

It's been my experience that most people aren't aware of the scope of creative software available for Ubuntu. The reason for this is complicated, but I suspect it mostly comes down to the functional availability provided by each application title for the Linux desktop. In this article, I'm going to give you an introduction to some of the best creative software applications for Ubuntu (and other Linux distros). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google's open-source Draco promises to squeeze richer 3D worlds into the web, gaming, and VR
    Google has published a set of open source libraries that should improve the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which could help deliver more detailed 3D apps.
  • Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system
    Point of sale (POS) systems have come a long way from the days of simple cash registers that rang up purchases. Today, POS systems can be all-in-one solutions that include payment processing, inventory management, marketing tools, and more. Retailers can receive daily reports on their cash flow and labor costs, often from a mobile device. The POS is the lifeblood of a business, and that means you need to choose one carefully. There are a ton of options out there, but if you want to save money, adapt to changing business needs, and keep up with technological advances, you would be wise to consider an open source system. An open source POS, where the source code is exposed for your use, offers significant advantages over a proprietary system that keeps its code rigidly under wraps.
  • Can academic faculty members teach with Wikipedia?
    Since 2010, 29,000 students have completed the Wiki Ed program. They have added 25 million words to Wikipedia, or the equivalent of 85,000 printed pages of content. This is 66% of the total words in the last print edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. When Wiki Ed students are most active, they are contributing 10% of all the content being added to underdeveloped, academic content areas on Wikipedia.
  • AMD HSA IL / BRIG Front-End Still Hoping To Get Into GCC 7
    For many months now there's been work on an AMD HSA IL front-end for GCC with supporting the BRIG binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). It's getting late into GCC 7 development and onwards to its final development stage while this new front-end has yet to be merged. Developer Pekka Jääskeläinen has been trying to get in the finishing reviews and changes for getting approval to land this BRIG front-end into the GNU Compiler Collection. It's a big addition and with GCC 7 soon just focusing on wrong-code fixes, bug fixes, and documentation fixes starting on 19 January, there would be just a few days left to land this new front-end for GCC 7 to avoid having to wait until next year for it to debut in stable with GCC 8.
  • Rcpp 0.12.9: Next round
    Yesterday afternoon, the nineth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R. Windows binaries have by now been generated; and the package was updated in Debian too. This 0.12.9 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, and the 0.12.8 release in November --- making it the thirteenth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 906 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further. That is up by sixthythree packages over the two months since the last release -- or about a package a day!