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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 25 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Has modern Linux lost its way? (Some thoughts on jessie) Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 11:28am
Story Korora 21 GNOME Edition Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 11:27am
Story What I can say about KDE Plasma 5 that I can’t say about Windows 8 Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 11:17am
Story When Linux Distros Are Abandoned Rianne Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 11:07am
Story Ubuntu phone Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 10:50am
Story Linux 3.20 To Support New HID Hardware, Improve Logitech HID++ Support Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 10:33am
Story Plasma 5.2 review – Fire all weapons! Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 10:04am
Story First impressions of ArchBSD 2014.09.04 Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 9:58am
Story Best Software Ever isn't systemd Roy Schestowitz 10/02/2015 - 9:54am
Story Linux Kernel 3.19 Stable Released, Install/Upgrade In Ubuntu/Linux Mint Mohd Sohail 10/02/2015 - 6:42am

"Green" netbook boasts five-hour battery life

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: CherryPal announced an Atom-based "Bing" netbook that runs Linux or Windows XP, and offers a claimed five hours of battery life. The company also announced an upgraded version of its Linux-based nettop, the CherryPal C114, and launched a "Green Maraschino" open-source Linux distribution supporting the Bing.

The Wide Gulf: Techies and Ordinary Users

Filed under
Linux

jehurst.wordpress: I seriously doubt any of my clients will ever be “Linux newbies” for the simple reason too many Linux people assume “newbie” means someone who will become one of the techies.

Open source developers ride the cloud

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: Nearly half of developers working on open source projects plan to offer applications as Web services offerings using cloud providers, according to results of an Evans Data open source development survey being released on Tuesday.

DVCS Round-Up: One System to Rule Them All?--Part 1

Filed under
Software

linuxfoundation.org: In this review, we will take a look at six different revision control systems. Namely these are git, Mercurial, darcs, Monotone, Bazaar (which is used by the Ubuntu project), and SVK (which is based upon Subversion). All six systems are distributed, and we will take a look at the different workflows supported (or enforced) by them.

Mozilla Wants to Start Watching Where You Click

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.wired.com: In an effort to better understand how people use the web, Mozilla has launched a new data gathering project for usability studies called Test Pilot. It's still just a concept, but as an aggregation model, it shows great promise.

Linux on a Laptop

Filed under
Linux

thestreet.com: There are a number of netbooks on the market, but I wanted to get my hands on one loaded with the Linux operating system, Ubuntu.

Netbooks Poised to Be the New OS Battleground?

Filed under
OS

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: In 2009, it won’t be the “year of the desktop” for any operating system–instead, the coveted trophy seems to be “year of the netbook.”

Apple, Linux Miss Golden Opportunity to Snag Desktop Market Share

Filed under
OS

serverwatch.com: Top-dog OS on the enterprise desktop? Linux and Apple had a golden chance to grab that title, and boy did they blow it!

Like the Pre? Wait Until It's Actually Finished

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

internetnews.com: Palm is taking a page from Apple's iPhone strategy book when it comes to keeping things quiet regarding its newly-announced Pre smartphone and webOS mobile platform.

KDE Voted Free Software Project of the Year

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: Linux Format magazine has unveiled its annual Reader Awards for 2008 and KDE won a 'landslide' victory in the category of Free Software Project of the year in recognition of the 'incredible' work done with KDE 4.

Follow up : On Linux security

Filed under
Linux

linux-wizard.net: Adam on his latest blog named On Linux security is 100% right when he's saying that Linux users should not have a false sense of security and impunity when using Linux. The only ways to be protected against theses kinds of issues are:

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Now Available

Filed under
Linux
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Now Available (PR)

  • Enterprise Linux 5.2 to 5.3 risk report
  • Red Hat revs Enterprise Linux distro
  • What's new in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3
  • Virtualization gets a boost in RHEL 5.3

Looking for Linux, but sold out

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blogs.the451group: I had an interesting time scouring the Internet for the right netbook for my wife. The biggest hangup was trying to find an Acer Aspire One netbook with Linux on it. It’s not that they aren’t made by the manufacturer, it’s that all the Linux netbooks seem to be getting gobbled up.

It’s All About Community

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxcanuck.wordpress: When I think of Linux, I think of community. There is lots more to Linux, but it is community that springs to my mind. That is probably because it is like a Second Life for me. I spend much time out there, in the Linux community. But when I think of community, I think of only one thing, Ubuntu.

Songbird - Sleek , Simple and Feature rich cross-platform Music Player

Filed under
Software

linuxondesktop.blogspot: I had reviewed Songbird close to two years back , and at that time Songbird was impressive but was bug ridden, lacked important features and certain degree of polishing which was expected from an application intended to be used on Desktops. Songbird 1.0 is an entirely different story altogether.

What this Firefox user misses about Chrome

Filed under
Software

news.cnet.com: Call me fickle, but I switched my default browser back to Firefox for the time being. In doing so, I discovered the features I really miss about Chrome.

New Features in OpenOffice.org 3.1, an Early Look

Filed under
OOo

oooninja.com: OpenOffice.org 3.1 is 65 days away, and developers are finishing up more than 1000 issues targeted for this Microsoft-Office-killer packing an army of new features, enhancements, and bug fixes.

Opera 10 Alpha - Preview

Filed under
Software

tuxarena.blogspot: Opera 10 is the next generation of the popular, closed-source web browser built in Qt, and available on UNIX (including both Linux and FreeBSD), Mac and Windows platforms.

What’s new in KDE 4.2? A Review:

Filed under
KDE

meldroc.com: Sometime around the end of the month, the KDE developers will unleash the official 4.2 release upon the world, and it will be picked up by your distro creator of choice sometime soon afterwards. At any rate, KDE 4.2 will include a bunch of new features, and some sorely needed bug-fixes. So, how does it hold up so far?

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More in Tux Machines

Security: Updates, GrayKey, Google and Cilium

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Hackers Leaked The Code Of iPhone Cracking Device “GrayKey”, Attempted Extortion
    The mysterious piece of hardware GrayKey might give a sense of happiness to cops because they can get inside most of the iPhone models currently active, including the iPhone X. The $30,000 device is known to crack a 4-digit iPhone passcode in a matter of a few hours, and a six-digit passcode in 3 days, or possibly 11 hours in ideal scenarios. That’s why security experts suggest that iOS users should keep an alphanumeric passcode instead of an all-number passcode.
  • Someone Is Trying to Extort iPhone Crackers GrayShift With Leaked Code
    Law enforcement agencies across the country are buying or have expressed interest in buying GrayKey, a device that can unlock up-to-date iPhones. But Grayshift, the company that makes the device, has attracted some other attention as well. Last week, an unknown party quietly leaked portions of GrayKey code onto the internet, and demanded over $15,000 from Grayshift—ironically, the price of an entry-level GrayKey—in order to stop publishing the material. The code itself does not appear to be particularly sensitive, but Grayshift confirmed to Motherboard the brief data leak that led to the extortion attempt.
  • It's not you, it's Big G: Sneaky spammers slip strangers spoofed spam, swamp Gmail sent files
    Google has confirmed spammers can not only send out spoofed emails that appear to have been sent by Gmail users, but said messages also appear in those users' sent mail folders. The Chocolate Factory on Monday told The Register that someone has indeed created and sent spam with forged email headers. These not only override the send address, so that it appears a legit Gmail user sent the message, but it also mysteriously shows up in that person's sent box as if they had typed it and emitted themselves. In turn, the messages would also appear in their inboxes as sent mail.
  • Cilium 1.0 Advances Container Networking With Improved Security
    For last two decades, the IPtables technology has been the cornerstone of Linux networking implementations, including new container models. On April 24, the open-source Cilium 1.0 release was launched, providing a new alternative to IPtables by using BPF (Berkeley Packet Filter), which improves both networking and security. The Cilium project's GitHub code repository defines the effort as Linux Native, HTTP Aware Network Security for Containers. Cilium development has been driven to date by stealth startup Covalent, which is led by CEO Dan Wendlandt, who well-known in the networking community for his work at VMware on software-defined networking, and CTO Thomas Graf, who is a core Linux kernel networking developer.

Applications: KStars, Kurly, Pamac, QEMU

  • KStars 2.9.5 is out!
    Autofocus module users would be happy to learn that the HFR value is now responsive to changing seeing conditions. Previously, the first successful autofocus operation would set the HFR Threshold value of which subsequent measurements are compared against during the in-sequence-focusing step.
  • Kurly – An Alternative to Most Widely Used Curl Program
    Kurly is a free open source, simple but effective, cross-platform alternative to the popular curl command-line tool. It is written in Go programming language and works in the same way as curl but only aims to offer common usage options and procedures, with emphasis on the HTTP(S) operations. In this tutorial we will learn how to install and use kurly program – an alternative to most widely used curl command in Linux.
  • Pamac – Easily Install and Manage Software on Arch Linux
    Arch Linux is one of the most popular Linux distribution available despite its apparent technicality. Its default package manager pacman is powerful but as time always tells, it is a lot easier to get certain things done using a mouse because GUI apps barely require any typing nor do they require you to remember any commands; and this is where Pamac comes in. Pamac is a Gtk3 frontend for libalpm and it is the GUI tool that Arch Linux users turn to the most when they aren’t in the mood to manage their software packages via the terminal; and who can blame them? It was specifically created to be used with Pacman.
  • QEMU 2.12 Released With RISC-V, Spectre/Meltdown & Intel vGPU Action
    QEMU 2.12 is now officially available as the latest stable feature update to this important component to the open-source Linux virtualization stack.

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