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Friday, 22 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint 17 "Qiana" Cinnamon and MATE Flavors Get Second Release with Major Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:13pm
Story Paying With Your Time Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:09pm
Story What would you do with millions of pounds? Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 7:04pm
Story KDE Connect turns your Android phone into a touchpad for your PC Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 6:58pm
Story LG Chromebase now available on Amazon for $329 Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 3:37pm
Story Samsung Likely To Launch Galaxy S5 Prime Soon Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 3:31pm
Story A Tiny Chinese Startup Has Made My Favourite New Smartphone Of The Year Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 3:22pm
Story The Samsung Galaxy Z: Tizen OS a big Risk? Specifications and Comparison Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 3:18pm
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 10:28am
Story Benchmarking Linux 3.16 File-Systems On An SSD Rianne Schestowitz 29/06/2014 - 6:39am

Mozilla to release Firefox 3.1 this year

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: Although Mozilla hasn't even released the final version of Firefox 3.0, its developers are already hammering out plans for the next edition, which may come as soon as late 2008, according to posts written by company executives.

Microsoft Supporting ODF? -- Close, But No Cigar

Filed under
OSS

groklaw.net: I wish I could wholeheartedly applaud the Microsoft announcement about native support for ODF, but I can't. Of course, it's better to have native support for ODF, no matter what motives may have influenced Microsoft's announcement, and I'm glad about that for the sake of end users. But it hasn't happened yet. Was the word 'vaporware' not coined for Microsoft?

How big is the open source funding pipeline?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: Venture Capital Journal has published an interesting article analyzing the state of venture capital funding in open source software. While some of the data is somewhat lacking* the article makes up for it with insight from the likes of Robin Vasan, Peter Fenton, Amit Pandey, Cameron Lester, Harold Goldberg, Larry Augustin, Lisa Lambert and Leo Spiegel.

X.Org 7.4 Creeps Closer To Release

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this month we had shared the progress of X.Org 7.4 with the features slated to be included in this next X release, what features have been postponed, and the repeated delays that always seem to plague the X.Org development community. Since then there still has yet to be any official update on its status, but the Wiki continues to claim a May 2008 release.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu, women, men, children, and the digital divide

  • Ubuntu Linux Boot CD - don’t leave home without it
  • Embedded Mandriva Linux in Samsung Network Printers?
  • 50 Reasons Why I Love Linux
  • Mal-what? Firefox 3 vs. Bad People
  • Firefox 3 will release with system-killing performance problem
  • ET: Quake Wars v1.5 Released
  • Becta: The Story Continues....
  • ODF Alliance sceptical of Microsoft supporting ODF dropping ISO OOXML
  • Marketing Linux in libraries
  • Multipointer X for “Minority Report” XO-2
  • New Drupal Book: Learning Drupal 6 Module Development
  • Microsoft can’t support Open XML
  • Are there in this world any examples of successful usage of GPL in business?

Puppy Linux 4.0 on a Dell Inspiron 1150 Review

Filed under
Linux

penguinway.net: I got a chance to check out the latest Puppy release this week. I booted the Puppy 4.0 “Dingo” CD on my trusty Dell Inspiron 1150 notebook. The system has a Pentium 4 2.4 Ghz Celeron, 1 gig of memory, and a 80 gigabyte hard drive.

Review: Everex gPCmini with gOS Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

desktoplinux.com: Everex's gPC mini is a small, quiet, powerful $500 computer with a hip Linux-based operating system designed for MySpace users and others who appreciate the entertainment value of PCs. With a few simple hardware tweaks, the gPC is sure to delight fun-loving PC users of all ages.

open graphics card available for preorder

Filed under
Hardware

hackaday.com: the open graphics project has started accepting preorders for their ogd1, a graphics card with a completely open source design. this initial release is billed as a high-end fpga prototyping kit specifically designed to test computer graphics architectures.

42 of the Best Free Linux Games

Filed under
Gaming

linuxlinks.com: "Can I game on it" is a frequently asked question we hear from Windows users toying with the idea of trying Linux for the first time. Well, the simple answer is yes! To demonstrate the level of sophistication available, we have put together a list of 42 high quality Linux games that all have the virtue of being free to play.

Interview: Mark Shuttleworth, Founder of the Ubuntu Project

Filed under
Interviews

guardian.co.uk: In 1999, the South African-born Mark Shuttleworth sold his internet company, Thawte, which provided digital certificates for websites, for more than $500m (£254m). After he started the Ubuntu project - named after an African word meaning "Humanity to others", which has since become the most popular GNU/Linux distribution.

some more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Using Last To Its Full Potential On Linux

  • CuteFlow - Document circulation and workflow system Setup in Ubuntu
  • Mutt Addressbook
  • How to find files, using command line (locate)
  • Quick Command Line Tip - Whois from the Command Line
  • Using Ubuntu's Gnome configuration editor
  • How to adjust the auto-hide delay in Gnome panels
  • Fedora 9: Livna Repo RPM Installation

Red Hat, SUSE update their enterprise Linux OSes

Filed under
Linux

idg.no: Linux vendors Red Hat Inc. and Novell Inc.'s SUSE division Wednesday unveiled updates for their enterprise Linux operating systems, adding new capabilities and hardware support in between the next major releases of their products.

Why You Cannot Forge an Open Source Forge

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: One of the striking developments on the open source enterprise software scene has been the rise and rise of the forge. These are typically adjuncts to the main commercial sites that try to foster a vibrant developer community centred on the relevant open source code.

Fresh Gentoo Install

Filed under
Gentoo

ronaldsteelman.com: Recently I decided that it was time I picked up some flavor of Linux and give it a try. I’ve installed Gentoo in the past, with some difficulty, but never stuck with it for long. The second time around with Gentoo wasn’t as bad as the first.

Also: Moving on from Gentoo…
And: Gentoo Software that never made it Sad

OLPC: following in the steps of Microsoft

Filed under
OLPC

itwire.com: When Nicholas Negroponte, the founder of the One Laptop Per Child project, said two months ago that the project needed to be managed "more like Microsoft" he was speaking nothing but the truth.

GCC 4.2.4, Bug Fix Release

Filed under
Software

kerneltrap.org: Joseph Myers announced the availability of GCC 4.2.4 saying, "GCC 4.2.4 is a bug-fix release, containing fixes for regressions in GCC 4.2.3 relative to previous GCC releases." He adds, "as always, a vast number of people contributed to this GCC release -- far too many to thank individually!"

Ubuntu will be more popular than Microsoft by 2010

Filed under
Ubuntu

andrewbetts.com/blog: Using extremely complicated analysis I can confirm that Microsoft will be less popular than Ubuntu Linux in the year 2010.

Compro Technology accused of GPL violation

Filed under
OSS

hexus.net: An eagle-eyed user of the Linux Kernel Mailing List archive, going by the name of Jo Shields (who many of you may know), has accused Compro Technology of violating the General Public License (GPL).

Does open source mandate change in copyright law?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: In their paper Money Ruins Everything, Australian law professor Dan Hunter and economist John Quiggin (right) argue that open source and Internet creativity mandate changes in copyright law, which now favor industries whose costs have disappeared.

Half way through UDS

Filed under
Ubuntu

jonobacon.org: Well, we are half way through the Ubuntu Developer Summit, and the week is going very, very well. We have been having some excellent, productive discussions, and are having a lot of fun in the evenings.

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More in Tux Machines

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

  • A different approach to kernel configuration
    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet. Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.
  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window
    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.
  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack
    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits. He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Beautify Your KDE Plasma 5 Desktop Environment with Freshly Ported Adapta Theme

Good morning! It's time to beautify your KDE Plasma 5 desktop environment, and we have just the perfect theme for that as it looks like the popular Adapta GTK theme was recently ported to Plasma 5. Read more

Roughing it, with Linux

I have been traveling for about two weeks now, spending 10 days camping in Iceland and now a few days on the ferry to get back. For this trip I brought along my Samsung N150 Plus (a very old netbook), loaded with openSUSE Linux 42.3. Read more

Red Hat: Ansible Tower, Patent Promise, and Shares Declining

  • Red Hat’s automation solution spreading among APAC enterprises
    Red Hat recently shared revealed its agentless automation platform is spreading among enterprises in APAC countries like Australia, China, India and Singapore. The company asserts its Ansible Tower helps enterprises cut through the complexities of modern IT environments with powerful automation capabilities that improve productivity and reduce downtime. “Today’s business demands can mean even greater complexity for many organisations. Such dynamic environments can necessitate a new approach to automation that can improve speed, scale and stability across IT environments,” says head of APAC office of technology at Red Hat, Frank Feldmann.
  • Red Hat broadens patent pledge to most open-source software
    Red Hat, the world's biggest open source company, has expanded its commitment on patents, which had originally been not to enforce its patents against free and open source software.
  • Red Hat expands Patent Promise
    Open-source software provider Red Hat has revised its Patent Promise, which was initially intended to discourage patent aggression against free and open-source software. The expanded version of the defensive patent aggregation scheme extends the zone of non-enforcement to all of Red Hat’s patents and all software under “well-recognised” open-source licenses. In its original Patent Promise in 2002, Red Hat said software patents are “inconsistent with open-source and free software”.
  • Red Hat Inc (RHT) AO Seeing a Consistent Downtrend
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) noted a price change of -0.14% and RingCentral, Inc. (RNG) closes with a move of -2.09%