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Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Season of KDE Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:38pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" MATE Stable Is Ready for Download – Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:32pm
Story KWayland Server Component Coming For KDE Plasma 5.2 Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:27pm
Story Where is M13? Review – A Simple and Powerful Galactic Atlas Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:16pm
Story Raspberry Pi and Coder by Google for beginners and kids Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:13pm
Story ‘Where is the nearest?’: Spain shares code for web map-tool Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:07pm
Story Top 4 Linux screenwriting software Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 11:03pm
Story Ubuntu Touch RTM Update 10, Important Milestone Achieved – Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 10:51pm
Story GenodeOS 14.11 Now Supports Intel's Wireless Hardware Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 10:49pm
Story Fedora 21 RC Is Out and Ready for Testing Rianne Schestowitz 28/11/2014 - 10:44pm

First-Person Shooter Games for Linux II: Nexuiz and OpenArena

Filed under
Gaming

tuxarena.blogspot: Today I will continue with two other first-person shooter (FPS) games, natively available for Linux: Nexuiz and OpenArena. They both are currently maintained and the wonderful thing about them is that they all are completely open-source, free and usually available in all the major distributions.

Windows 7 pre-beta build: What’s inside

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet: Microsoft isn’t going to show Windows 7 to attendees of the Professional Developers Conference (PDC) in Los Angeles until Tuesday, October 28. But new info about what’s part of the pre-beta build that will be provided to show-goers is beginning to trickle out.

Review: Gentoo 2008.0 and beyond Part 1

Filed under
Gentoo

ericsbinaryworld.com: Another distro in the seven distros included in Linux Format Magazine issue #110 is Gentoo 2008.0. This is an interesting release given the recent news that, at least for the time being, Gentoo is not going to be releasing these discs anymore. Apparently for both of the last two years there has been a lot of trouble with compiling the LiveCDs.

Puppy 4.1: What’s Not to Like?

Filed under
Linux

linuxdistrochoices.com: I have used Puppy in the past, over a year ago, and I thought it was OK…just OK. Now you have to realize that Puppy is a small form distribution which is designed to use minimail resources and at the same time provide all of the functions that a Desktop user would want. All that said, when Puppy 4.1 came out I decided to look at it again….I am glad I did.

Arch Linux Report Card

Filed under
Linux

eyemeansit.blogspot: I've used Kubuntu, Mepis, PCLinuxOS, but was irked by all the bloat, as well as the need to wait for the next "Intrepid Ibex" or whatever.

odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Why Linux Is Popular with Hardware Companies and Developers

  • The Fastest Way To Upgrade Ubuntu
  • Open Source Coding: A new buzzword for college graduates
  • SourceForge using Drupal
  • Test Firefox 3.1 Beta 1 in Debian Without Changing Your Existing Installation
  • No need for VMware Tools in openSUSE 11.0
  • Ridiculous Resumes - Unix, Linux And Everything In Between
  • Security Flaw Is Revealed in T-Mobile’s Google Phone
  • The TV Server I Always Wanted, Part 2 -- Options
  • Firefox Removes its License Agreement From Ubuntu
  • How to fix an Ubuntu crash

ZIM - A Desktop Wiki / Note Taking App

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Wikis are great for collaboration and note taking. ZIM is one such package that helps you create a wiki on your desktop. Or in other words you can use it as an excellent note taking application.

Linux Hater's Blog goes bye bye

Filed under
Linux
Web

linuxhaters.blogspot: It was fun while it lasted folks. I'm closing up shop. Moving on. It turns out, the more hate I dished out, the less I had to hate on.

Listen to Linux

Filed under
Linux
  • FLOSS Weekly 46: SCALE

  • Linux Outlaws 60 - ...Poking a Hole Into Your Firewall
  • Linux Void Episode 10.1 - Open Force

Everything you Need to Know about Ubuntu 8.10 - Intrepid Ibex

Filed under
Ubuntu

maximumpc.com: Ubuntu 8.10, named Intrepid Ibex, is scheduled for release next week, so we figured it's time to run down the checklist of improvements, fixes, and enhancements since Hardy Heron came out earlier this year.

Wine 1.1.7 Review - First Steps of Direct3D 10 Implementation

Filed under
Software

vivapinkfloyd.blogspot: I think Wine is one of the most promising and useful applications, especially for those who need to run Windows programs in a Linux environment. A new development release is put up every two weeks or so, and improvements are visible from each version to another.

Reference for Ubuntu Starters

Filed under
Ubuntu

yabblog.com: Synaptic? deb? sudo? apt? Damn! I still remember when I first installed Ubuntu. Here, I will be posting a reference about Ubuntu things! And to end with top 5 Ubuntu resources on web for Ubuntu starters.

Linux Is Making Me Insane

Filed under
Ubuntu

thebigmoney.com: I installed Ubuntu after being repeatedly challenged by a small but vocal group of readers to look beyond my comfort zone. Whenever I write about the relative differences between Apple and Microsoft-based machines, I invariably get comments from people who are irritated that I didn't mention Ubuntu as an alternative.

10 Cool and Funny Firefox Video Ads

Filed under
Moz/FF

junauza.com: Firefox is the only web browser in the world that has tons of enthusiastic followers. I've seen desktop wallpapers, icons, t-shirts, graffiti, and even tattoos that are dedicated to Firefox. But it didn't stop there. Just recently, I saw some videos on YouTube that promotes the use of Firefox.

Java and Linux on the Android - Almost the Perfect Match?

Filed under
Misc

steamingopencup.blogspot: As this blogspot's subtitle states, you'll be reading more about Java and Linux here (aside from physics) than anything else, and I was hoping I'd have the opportunity to write a post that would talk about both of them under the same spotlight. Tonight, I was given that opportunity.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ask Linux.com: Missing memory, built-in webcams, and shared servers

  • How to Install OpenOffice.org 3.0 in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Turn on Font Autohinting
  • Linux Tips: run fsck on a loopback filesystem
  • How to Install And Configure FUPPES on Ubuntu Hardy
  • Fun with Linux Commands-II
  • Sabayon-Funtoo Linux - Howto
  • Multiple Desktop Wallpapers in Ubuntu 8.10
  • Script for adding new users

7 Fantastic Internet Hoaxes

Filed under
Web

informationweek.com: Despite our increasing technological sophistication, we can't help falling for email about Bigfoot, giant mutant cats, doomed tourists, and deadly butt spiders. Admit it. Even you, a savvy veteran e-mail user, have fallen for one or more of these Internet rumors.

A chat with John Lilly, Mozilla CEO

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

mozillalinks.org: John was the Mozilla Corporation Chief Operating Officer for the last few years, and in January this year, he took the high responsibility of succeeding Mitchell Baker as the head of the maker of Firefox.

Open Source - Bundling benefits together

Filed under
OSS

brajeshwar.com: It is of utmost importance to rule out the notion that Linux is “the latest thing” and a “prime money saver”, but stress on the fact that application in real business to streamline the operations is of more significance.

3 Classic First-Person Shooter Games for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

tuxarena.blogspot: A true classic and one of the most played online first-person shooter games, Wolfenstein: ET was supposed to be released as a new mod for Return to Castle Wolfenstein, but the single-player part of the game was abandoned and it was released at no cost, as a standalone multiplayer game.

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More in Tux Machines

LMMS Guide Part 1: Creating Simple Melodies Using Sounds And Instruments

​LMMS stands for Linux Multimedia Studio. It is a very good open-source program that is used to create music tracks using sound files, predefined instruments, and sound effects. LMMS has versions for Windows and macOS in addition to Linux. Their website, of course, lists all of their features offered to users. This article will attempt to provide practical guides and tips for composing songs using LMMS. Read
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How To Create Shell Scripts

Having to type the same command over and over again can be a daunting task and tiresome for that matter. The shell scripts are really easy to create and run saving you from a lot of misery and anguish if you really prefer using the terminal over using the GUI for running tasks. Read
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Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.