Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 26 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linaro adds five with partner program srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 5:12pm
Poll How's Fedora 15 srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 8:22am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 7:37am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 7:26am
Story How to use KDE 4 Desktop Activities srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 7:16am
Story Linux Mint 11 - Vital Service or Prolonging Agony? srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 7:14am
Story Linux Australia wants to boost its PR stocks srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 7:12am
Story Popular Linux Game 'Frogatto' Updated to Version 1.1 srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 3:54am
Story Second Firefox 5 Beta Coming This Friday srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 3:52am
Story GNOME 3.0.2 Bug-Fix Release Arrives srlinuxx 27/05/2011 - 3:51am

Adobe Photoshop 7 using Wine on old PIII 600mhz

Filed under
Software

Following on from the last post I`d like to write a little something about my experience of running Photoshop 7 on this machine. Its a subject that I expect a number of people will be interested in.

What is this ss program thingy?

Filed under
HowTos

The "ss" program is an acronym for "sockstat" or socket statistics. Don't we geeks love our acronyms Smile. This program was written by Alexey Kuznetsov. But what does it do?

Opera OLPC Edition

Filed under
OLPC
Software

This is a special edition of the Opera desktop version - the Opera OLPC Edition.

Linux: Page Replacement Design

Filed under
Linux

A university student studying operating systems asked about why the Linux kernel uses two chained lists in its LRU (least recently used) page replacement algorithm. Andrea Arcangeli, whose virtual memory subsystem was merged into the 2.4.10 kernel, explained, "back then I designed it with two lru lists because by splitting the active from the inactive cache allows to detect the cache pollution before it starts discarding the working set."

Test of current RealPlayer/HelixPlayer nightly builds

Filed under
Software

After I wondered what the current state of the HelixPlayer/RealPlayer development is I asked the developers. The answer was that there is still no date given, but that I could help them by testing the players in my setup. And since that isn’t difficult at all I downloaded the rpms and gave them a try.

Run new packages on older distros with backports

Filed under
Software

If you run a stable system, you don't have to miss out on the latest and greatest releases of your favorite applications -- just use a backport to get a package of a new release that's been "back-ported" to your older distribution.

Ubuntu Quicktip - Converting Mac .dmg images into .iso images

Filed under
HowTos

I recently came across a handy script that allows you to convert a Mac OSX or Apple’s iPod (iPod firmware generated images) to standard .iso files.

GIMP 2.3.14 Development Release

Filed under
Software

Version 2.3.14 is another development snapshot to wet your appetite for the upcoming GIMP 2.4 release. The source code can be downloaded from the usual places.

Jono Bacon: Misinformation: The Enemy Of Community

Filed under
OSS

Building and running communities is hard work. What is seen by some as simply a means of providing enough hands on deck to get things done is actually a much larger and more complex web of relationships, politics, resources and diplomacy.

Linspire's CNR to go multi-Linux, remain free

Filed under
Software

Linspire announced today that it plans to expand its CNR ("Click 'N Run") digital download and software management service to support multiple desktop Linux distributions beyond Linspire and Freespire, initially adding Debian, Fedora, OpenSUSE, and Ubuntu, using both .deb and .rpm packages. And, the standard CNR service will remain free.

Wal Mart endorses Novell, Microsoft deal

Filed under
SUSE

Wal Mart is a huge fan of the Novell-Microsoft collaboration, it said today. It already uses lots of Microsoft products inhouse and had pressed vendors to provide intellectual property assurance for quite a while.

Also: HP doesn't like Linux

Tee for two

Filed under
Software

For all the console warriors out there I am sure you know about shell redirection and piping the output of commands to another command or to a file. Those pipes are not made of glass so if you want to monitor the data as it flows through the pipe you are out of luck. There is a solution.

Why 2007 Won't Be the Year of Linux (and why it doesn't matter)

Filed under
Linux

It used to be that every January, you'd see a number of articles talking about why Linux was destined to take off in the coming year. If I were good at using spreadsheets (I prefer my 'text file / awk / bc' method), I could present you with a graph showing the decline in these public displays of optimism over the years. Now here we are in January of 2007 and a search on Google's news page has not come up with one writer willing to make the claim that 2007 will be the year Linux ``makes it''.

UK ISP devotes profits to foster OSS development

Filed under
OSS

In 2003, Jason Clifford started an Internet service provider (ISP) in Hertfordshire, England, called UK Free Software Network. What sets UKFSN apart from other ISPs is the fact that it gives away its profits to fund students working on free and open source software (FOSS) projects.

Gimmie: A New Panel for Gnome

Filed under
HowTos

Gimmie is an elegant way to think about how you use your desktop computer.Gimmie is a new concept of the panel designed to shift the direction of the desktop beyond the standard WIMP model (Windows, Icons, Menu, Pointer) towards one directly representing the concepts that modern desktop users use every day. It is being considered for inclusion in Gnome 3.0.

Will OLPC change Linux?

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

During a tutorial that Chris Blizzard gave at Linux.conf.au, there were quite a few interesting ideas and concepts raised that presented an interesting blueprint for Linux in the future.

OpenSuse 10.2 Review

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

I looked at OpenSuse 10.2 as a Win2k replacement. I’ve been impressed with Suse over the years so I was looking forward to see what Novell brought to the table with 10.2. I am not going to judge a distribution on its setup process (OS installation, mp3 setup, flash setup, adding printer, etc), however I am going to mention some installation pitfalls I ran into during the 10.2 install.

Ubuntu founder doesn't "get" enterprise Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

OK, that's not really true. Mark is a sharp guy, and gets open source as well, indeed, better, than most. But he's completely wrong on his criticism of Red Hat (which Greg of the Fedora Project shoots down). His basic point? Because RHEL is a closed binary, it's proprietary.

Dan Bricklin Wants to Pick Your Brain re Novell-Microsoft Meeting

Filed under
SUSE

Dan Bricklin is hosting a meeting on Monday from 9AM to noon sponsored by the Massachusetts Technology Leadership Council on the Novell-Microsoft deal. I know. Blech. But both Microsoft and Novell are sending representatives to speak, and what Dan is asking for is this: what should he ask them?

openSUSE 10.2

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

openSUSE is a widely known distribution for its huge array of unique tools for managing virtually every part of the system, without having to even think about using the console. It’s also known for the stability of the official packages and releases, and it’s known for a very stable package-system.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • OpenVZ 7.0 Becomes A Complete Linux Distribution, Based On VzLinux
    OpenVZ, a long-standing Linux virtualization technology and similar to LXC and Solaris Containers, is out with their major 7.0 release. OpenVZ 7.0 has focused on merging the OpenVZ and Virtuozzo code-bases along with replacing their own hypervisor with that of Linux's KVM. Under OpenVZ 7.0, it has become a complete Linux distribution based upon VzLinux.
  • OpenVZ 7.0 released
    I’m pleased to announce the release of OpenVZ 7.0. The new release focuses on merging OpenVZ and Virtuozzo source codebase, replacing our own hypervisor with KVM.
  • Announcing git-cinnabar 0.4.0 beta 2
    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.
  • FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals
    In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.
  • Lightweight Sub-CAs in FreeIPA 4.4
    Last year FreeIPA 4.2 brought us some great new certificate management features, including custom certificate profiles and user certificates. The upcoming FreeIPA 4.4 release builds upon this groundwork and introduces lightweight sub-CAs, a feature that lets admins to mint new CAs under the main FreeIPA CA and allows certificates for different purposes to be issued in different certificate domains. In this post I will review the use cases and demonstrate the process of creating, managing and issuing certificates from sub-CAs. (A follow-up post will detail some of the mechanisms that operate behind the scenes to make the feature work.)
  • RcppArmadillo 0.7.200.2.0
    The second Armadillo release of the 7.* series came out a few weeks ago: version 7.200.2. And RcppArmadillo version 0.7.200.2.0 is now on CRAN and uploaded to Debian. This followed the usual thorough reverse-dependecy checking of by now over 240 packages using it. For once, I let it simmer a little preparing only a package update via the GitHub repo without preparing a CRAN upload to lower the update frequency a little. Seeing that Conrad has started to release 7.300.0 tarballs, the time for a (final) 7.200.2 upload was now right. Just like the previous, it now requires a recent enough compiler. As g++ is so common, we explicitly test for version 4.6 or newer. So if you happen to be on an older RHEL or CentOS release, you may need to get yourself a more modern compiler. R on Windows is now at 4.9.3 which is decent (yet stable) choice; the 4.8 series of g++ will also do. For reference, the current LTS of Ubuntu is at 5.4.0, and we have g++ 6.1 available in Debian testing.

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: Debian

  • Debian LGBTIQA+
    I have a long overdue blog entry about what happened in recent times. People that follow my tweets did catch some things. Most noteworthy there was the Trans*Inter*Congress in Munich at the start of May. It was an absolute blast. I met so many nice and great people, talked and experienced so many great things there that I'm still having a great motivational push from it every time I think back. It was also the time when I realized that I in fact do have body dysphoria even though I thought I'm fine with my body in general: Being tall is a huge issue for me. Realizing that I have a huge issue (yes, pun intended) with my length was quite relieving, even though it doesn't make it go away. It's something that makes passing and transitioning for me harder. I'm well aware that there are tall women, and that there are dedicated shops for lengthy women, but that's not the only thing that I have trouble with. What bothers me most is what people read into tall people: that they are always someone they can lean on for comfort, that tall people are always considered to be self confident and standing up for themselves (another pun, I know ... my bad).
  • [GSOC] Week 8&9 Report
    This particular week has been tiresome as I did catch a cold ;). I did come back from Cape Town where debconf taking place. My arrival at Montreal was in the middle of the week, so this week is not plenty of news…
  • Debian on Jetson TK1
    I became interested in running Debian on NVIDIA's Tegra platform recently. NVIDIA is doing a great job getting support for Tegra upstream (u-boot, kernel, X.org and other projects). As part of ensuring good Debian support for Tegra, I wanted to install Debian on a Jetson TK1, a development board from NVIDIA based on the Tegra K1 chip (Tegra 124), a 32-bit ARM chip.
  • RC bugs 2016/01-29

Android Leftovers