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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 18 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

today's extra links:

Filed under
News
  • A quick overview of Linux kernel crash dump analysis

  • Linux, Speedtouch USB modem and ADSL = major headache!
  • Linux Goes Legit
  • How to install Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn) in OS X using Parallels Desktop 3.0
  • Freespire 2.0 Review
  • Linux: The Original Process Scheduler
  • Xandros Licenses MS Exchange Protocols
  • Where does SCO go from here?
  • Bash eternal history
  • Simply Mepis 6.0 64
  • Opera-9.23 Is Out, So Lets Install It In Debian And/or Ubuntu
  • Microsoft PR bunnies love Firefox - shocka
  • What does your favorite text editor say about you?

High-speed military networking device runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices: A U.K.-based embedded software consultancy says it recently implemented a Linux driver and other software for a marine-based military application involving high-speed, fiber-optic networking.

Also: How Linux became a mobile phone OS

LinuxMCE Partners with KDE for New Release

Filed under
KDE

the dot: After an extensive beta testing period a new version of LinuxMCE, release 0704, was recently made available to the public that shows how we can indeed have our media center cake and eat it too. Read on for details of this release and future plans for KDE integration.

50 Reasons to Dump Windows

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxhaxor.net: I wanted to write 5 reasons to dump windows over linux, but soon I was so overwhelmed by rush of reasons that I could find, that I ended up making a list of 50 reasons.

Sunny forecast for Linux kernel predictions

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: One of the first things many decision-makers want for any given software product is a roadmap, so they can plan around releases. However, the Linux kernel is and always has been bereft of a roadmap. To counter this, the Linux Foundation announced today that it is offering a Linux Weather Forecast to help provide some guidance to developers and organizations that need to know where the kernel is going.

Buying an HP Pavilion laptop for GNU/Linux

Linux Journal: In contrast to HP's printer division, the laptop division has almost no awareness whatsoever of non-Windows operating systems. Coming to the store armed with an Ubuntu Live CD, I eventually settled on an HP Pavilion dv2410ca. A quick investigation showed that the laptop could boot Live CDs for the latest versions of Debian and Ubuntu.

Nice Shorts:

Filed under
Software
  • Nice Awn mock up

  • Firefox 3 gets smooth tab scrolling
  • KDE4 Rev 680445 - Dolphin File Manager Preview
  • I Choose Debian Lenny Over Ubuntu
  • Howto restrict su command to superuser only in Linux
  • New Scribus Icon

Distributed administration using SSH

Filed under
News

Use Secure Shell (SSH) to run commands on remote UNIX systems and, with some simple scripts, put together a system that enables you to manage many systems simultaneously from one machine without having to log in directly to the machines themselves.

Package management abstraction with D-Bus

Filed under
Software

/home/liquidat: Richard Hughes recently proposed to use D-Bus to abstract the package management solutions for Linux. He implemented the abstraction in the “PackageKit” layer and showed a working GUI.

Stable kernel 2.6.22.3 released

Filed under
Linux

The 2.6.22.3 stable kernel update has been released. There's a number of fixes in here, one of which is security-related. "This release has a few bugfixes so all users of the 2.6.22 series are encouraged to update to it. Especially people with laptops, they will appreciate the power savings in this release."

More Here

Can Large Commercial Web Sites Be Run on Free Linux?

Filed under
Linux

eWeek: Many Linux distributions can run large Web sites, but are you prepared to bet your online business on a free Linux distribution? eWEEK IT expert Stephane Saux, IT director at the San Francisco Chronicle, has some answers.

When "RTFM" becomes "Oh, Just Forget It!"

Filed under
Linux

Penguin Pete: There are many ways to answer the questions of a technology newbie. Sometimes it is appropriate to respond in detail, sometimes it is appropriate to tell them that they would be better served by Reading That Fabled Manual or making friends with Google... and sometimes there are people who are beyond any help, at all, at all.

Hardening your systems with Bastille Linux

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: System administrators need to secure their systems while avoiding locking them down so strictly that they become useless. Bastille is a software tool that eases the process of hardening a Linux system, giving you the choice of what to lock down and what not to, depending on your security requirements.

Installing and optimising the Drupal CMS on Debian Etch

Filed under
Drupal
HowTos

Debian Administration: Drupal is an excellent free software content management system, written in PHP. It's a good choice if you have to build a new site for non-technical users or customers.

GNOME Desktop project 10 years old!

Filed under
News

Exactly 10 years ago, on 15th August 1997, Miguel de Icaza started his first announcement about GNOME Desktop project with this words: "We want to develop a free and complete set of user friendly applications and desktop tools, similar to CDE and KDE but based entirely on free software."

Read more

What *NIX has wrong for the desktop: Top 12

Filed under
OS

beranger: Everything *NIX, from GNU/Linux to *BSD, has some overengineered or underengineered concepts that don't fit that well with a desktop or laptop usage. A short list.

50 Open Source Desktop Projects: Good Downloads

Filed under
Software

matt hartley: Behold the vast and sprawling feast of open source downloads. Incredible, ain’t it? Armed with little more than an Internet connection and some extra space on your hard drive, a rich cornucopia awaits you.

My top 5 Firefox/Thunderbird annoyances

Filed under
Moz/FF

still don’t have a title: Firefox is constantly gaining marked share (especially here in Europe) and it’s little not-yet-so-popular brother Thunderbird is evolving too. I’m concerned that the quality of their software (especially Firefox under Linux) has decreased in the last months. Here are my top 5 annoyances.

Open-source companies to be acquired by proprietary vendors?

Filed under
OSS

matt asay: Tim believes that open source, at least as defined by open-source licensing, has a short shelf-life that will be consumed by Web 2.0 by proprietary software vendors. In other words, why don't I just give up, sell out, and go home?

Ubuntu servers shut down for attacking others

Filed under
Ubuntu

the inquirer: MAKER OF the Open Sauce Ubuntu software, Cannonical had to shut down five of the eight of its servers after receiving reports that they were attacking other servers.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • OpenShot 2.2 Offers Free, Open Source Pro Editing for 4K and 5K Videos
    4K ultra HD resolution is without a doubt now at least the mainstream near future standard for digital recording, content and display resolution and we don’t expect this to change for at least a few years. The majority of new larger 50 inch+ TVs going on sale today are 4K models, 4K monitors are becoming much more common and now virtually all mid-range to premium digital recording cameras offer ultra HD resolution of at least [email protected] x 2160 pixels and in many cases even higher.
  • Google Drive CLI Client For Linux
    Google Drive is one of the most popular services to store your files in the cloud. You can access to your Google Drive account through a web browser or using a client. This time I’m going to talk about one Google Drive client but without graphical interface, in this tutorial you’re going to know how to use a client through the command line interface to access, download and upload to your google drive.
  • Calligra 3.0 Open-Source Office Suite Officially Released, Krita and Author Out
    After a long time in development, Calligra, the open-source office suite designed for KDE Plasma desktops, makes a comeback in 2017 with the release of the 3.0 milestone. While many GNU/Linux users were able to download and install the new Calligra 3.0 office suite from the official channels of the project or the stable software repositories of their favorite GNU/Linux distribution since last week, an official announcement was published earlier this week.
  • Free Software Foundation Makes ‘Major Overhaul’ In High Priority Projects
    Coolness alert! The Free Software Foundation has announced an updated list of high priority projects on a global scale. Top priorities now include a free software phone operating system, clouds, hardware, voice and video chat, inclusiveness, security and internationalisation of free software. The announcement is available here. It includes a link to the new list. The update followed feedback from about 150 free software community members over the past year. FSF isn’t seeking to run or control the projects, but will encourage them whether they are under their auspices or not, they said.
  • GNU Screen v.4.5.0
    I’m proud to announce the release of GNU Screen v.4.5. This time it’s mostly a bugfix release. We added just one new feature: now it’s possible to specify logfile name by using parameter -L (default name stays screenlog.0). Myself also spent some time to make source code a bit cleaner. As you probably noticed we were going to release 4.5 until Christmas. Unfortunately, we could not do it because of some internal GNU problems. I’m very apologise for that.

OSS Leftovers

  • Why 2017 Will Bring Cheer for Open Source Enthusiasts
    A few years ago, open source was the less-glamourous and low-cost alternative in the enterprise world, and no one would have taken the trouble to predict what its future could look like. Fast-forward to 2016, many of us will be amazed by how open source has become the de facto standard for nearly everything inside an enterprise. Open source today is the primary engine for innovation and business transformation. Cost is probably the last reason for an organisation to go in for open source. An exclusive market study conducted by North Bridge and Black Duck brought some fascinating statistics a few months ago. In the study titled “Future of Open Source”, about 90 percent of surveyed organisations said that open source improves efficiency, interoperability and innovation. What is even more significant is the finding that the adoption of open source for production environments outpaced the proprietary software for the first time – more than 55 percent leverage OSS for production infrastructure.
  • Five ways open source accelerates IoT
    Just having seen Passengers in the theater the other night, I reflected on how soon we might see a self-piloted space vessel like this transporting passengers through deep space. This incredible film features a spacecraft that is a work of IoT art, where things interact with one another to manage some of the harshest conditions imaginable. As an advocate for open source software and the innovation derived from its collaborative development methodology, I have a deep interest in how the journey to an IoT where a future like this is possible can benefit from open source solutions. I would even argue that the acceptance of open source methodologies has helped IoT gain momentum, capture mindshare and quickly deliver real results.
  • How to gain confidence to participate in open source
    As your brain develops, you learn about what you can and should do in the world, and what you can't and shouldn't. Your actions are influenced by surroundings and norms, and many times what keeps you from participating is a lack of self-confidence.

Debian Isn't Difficult, Fedora Elections Winners, Fav Distro

Prospective users still avoid Debian initially because it's difficult to install, or so they believe. It turns out they're not basing their opinions on real life. Keith Curtis wrote up his experience installing Arch on his new Lenovo laptop, after a fairly complete hardware review as well. Jamie Watson got a new notebook too and today shared a bit on getting it ready for Linux. Part of that was booting Mint 18.1 which gave him something to smile about. Elsewhere, the Fedora committee elections results are in and Dominique Leuenberger posted a review of this week in Tumbleweed. Gary Newell test drove Elementary OS 0.4 and OpenSource.com asked, "What is your favorite Linux distribution?" Read more

Games for GNU/Linux