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Monday, 20 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux @ About.com Rianne Schestowitz 02/09/2014 - 12:29am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 9:21pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 9:21pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 9:21pm
Story Mozilla Firefox 32 Officially Released Rianne Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 8:59pm
Story Time For the GNU/Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 8:52pm
Story 5 tips on migrating to open-source software Rianne Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 8:52pm
Story A web browser for the Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 8:43pm
Story Nouveau X.Org Driver Released With DRI3+Present, Maxwell, GLAMOR Rianne Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 8:34pm
Story AMBIANCE & RADIANCE COLORS THEMES UPDATED WITH XFCE FIXES Rianne Schestowitz 01/09/2014 - 8:25pm

Easiest way to try linux on windows

Filed under
Software

jamesselvakumar.wordpress: Ever had these questions in your mind..?
- You are a windows user but want to try linux
- You are interested in trying linux but don’t want to ditch windows either
- You want linux and windows in your machine without disturbing each other

Linux, Laptops and Dual Displays

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

zdnet.co.uk/blog: I need to update some information related to a post that I made last week about multiple displays with Linux. In a nutshell, I have a laptop and a port replicator with a display connected to it. That gives rise to three basic "states" for display.

Apache’s open source governance model

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: The core Apache servers power the web: combining dominant market share with dominant performance and stunning software reliability - and because that combination is unusual, we have to ask why and how?

Benchmarking Microsoft Word 95 through Word 2007

Filed under
Software

oooninja.com: The responses to benchmarking multiple versions of OpenOffice.org varied. Common responses were oversimplification of the results and some unrealistic expectations. To put that data into perspective, here is a benchmark for Microsoft Word 95 through 2007.

Mozilla to release first Firefox 3.1 preview Friday

Filed under
Moz/FF
  • Mozilla to release first Firefox 3.1 preview Friday

  • Firefox 3.1 Alpha 1 code freeze is on
  • about:mozilla - Developer News July 22

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Deleting files from root's trash folder in Ubuntu

  • Sharing folders between Windows and Linux
  • Part 2: Building a Secure & Redundant Intranet Server With Gentoo - Apache - PHP5 - MySQL
  • Linux tools to convert file formats
  • How to install microdia on debian and ubuntu based
  • Nautilus Tips and Tricks
  • Setting up Rails Development Environment on Ubuntu GNU/Linux
  • How To Find Hard Disk Revolutions Per Minute (RPM) Speed From A Shell Prompt
  • Test Drive Adobe Flash Player 10 Beta 2 in Ubuntu

Bill Gates vs. Linus Torvalds: Who has a bigger ego?

Filed under
OS

junauza.com: If you are Bill Gates or Linus Torvalds, it is totally understandable to have an ego the size of the biggest planet. The two has been known to make comments that will forever keep the geek pride alive. If you want proof, just read the following quotes.

Open source still the best way to develop software

Filed under
OSS

practical-tech.com: The open-source way of creating programs is still the best way, just don’t confuse it with being the perfect way — there’s no such thing.

Ubuntu Puts Big Emphasis on Small PCs at OSCON

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcworld.com: This week at OSCON, the annual open-source conference in Portland, Oregon, Canonical is showing off a new version of its Ubuntu Linux operating system that's designed specifically for Intel Atom-based Netbook PCs. Ubuntu Netbook Remix and Mobile Internet Device editions of Linux are gearing up to compete with Windows.

Dictators in free and open source software

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Some people seem to challenge the idea that most (if not all) free software projects need a benevolent dictator—that is, somebody who has the last say on every decision. They are quick to point out Linus Torvalds’ past “mistakes” (see the brackets): using BitKeeper to manage the kernel, not allowing “pluggable” schedulers in Linux, etc. As a software developer, I feel that a dictator is absolutely necessary in every free software project. Here is why.

Exactly who, is Linux for?

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Is Linux for everyone? Is Linux destined to be the Great Replacement? Will Linux ever reach billions on billions of installs in the world? Not likely. If Linux isn't for everyone, then who is it for?

Gaming on Ubuntu (Linux)

Filed under
Gaming

look2linux.com: From browsing the site I found that we get a lot of comments here that say things like “I am not switching to Linux because then I can’t play my games!” and “Ubuntu sucks because I can’t play games!”. Well, here is the thing… you can. There are tonnes and tonnes of games out there for you to try and play. There are even sites and programs dedicated to getting your windows games up and running.

Nvidia on KDE 4.1: a greedy problem

Filed under
KDE
Software

liquidat.wordpress: KDE 4.1 was released as a RC recently and will soon be released. While it will be a very usable and stable desktop environment ready to be used almost everywhere most users with NVIDIA cards will not be pleased: their proprietary driver spoil the fun.

Why windows why??

Filed under
Microsoft

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Rant mode on. Why does windows make it so difficult to transfer settings? Why does windows go out of its way to be incompatible with itself? Why is windows purposely designed to make our lives a nightmare? Why can't I take a windows hard disk out of one machine and put it in another and have it work? Why?

Mark Shuttleworth: life on mars, Ubuntu in emerging markets

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: After the technical sessions concluded, some OSCON attendees headed across town to see Mark Shuttleworth, the charismatic founder of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, give a presentation to local Portland group Legion of Tech.

Why Linux is Not on the Desktop

Filed under
Linux

blogcritics.org: Let me start by saying that I love Linux. So when I saw the site Why Linux is Better, I was kind of nodding my head in agreement to many of its reasons. But then I thought about it:

IBM nears a decade of Linux and open source

Filed under
OSS

techtarget.com: After nearly a decade of active involvement in open source, IBM's commitment to Linux is broad and deep, said Inna Kuznetsova, the director of IBM Linux strategy – a sentiment shared by most, though not all, IBM observers.

what is KDE?

Filed under
KDE

chani.wordpress: whenever people ask me that question, I have trouble answering. what is KDE? it’s not just a desktop environment any more, not by a long shot. it’s a whole universe of software projects (one of which is a desktop environment).

Kernel Log: No unstable series; Linux 2008.7; dealing with security fixes

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Along with 2.6.27 development ramping up, there is a variety of other Linux kernel news. Shortly after the release of Linux 2.6.26, someone on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) asked what sort of changes – either potentially or already in the works – might give rise to a 2.7 development series.

Macedonia and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

aidworkerdaily.com: A few weeks ago, while my wife was still in Macedonia, I asked her to install Ubuntu. Shortly after returning to the States my wife called her father and asked him if he had a minute so that she could explain to him how to get online. His response was, “Don’t worry about it. I figured it out on my own.”

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