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Friday, 27 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Cacti bandwidth monitoring tool in debian etch

Filed under
HowTos

Cacti is a complete network graphing solution designed to harness the power of RRDTool’s data storage and graphing functionality. Cacti provides a fast poller, advanced graph templating, multiple data acquisition methods, and user management features out of the box. All of this is wrapped in an intuitive, easy to use interface that makes sense for LAN-sized installations up to complex networks with hundreds of devices.

TUX Issue #19 Now Available

Filed under
Linux

Issue number 19, November 2006, of TUX now is available. Subscribers, you can download this issue here or simply follow the Download TUX button on the right to download the current issue.

The magic sysreq options introduced

Filed under
HowTos

The sysreq key is a "magical" key combination to which your Linux kernel will respond, regardless of whatever it is doing. On x86 you press the key combo 'ALT-SysRq-'

Ubuntu Tricks - How to mount Windows partitions read/writable

Previously I looked at mounting your NTFS drive on your Ubuntu box using raw Fuse to do it. Now we’re going to look at what may be a better way to do it. It’s certainly easier and from reports, NTFS-3G is a bit more stable as well. This Howto is written specifically for and from Ubuntu 6.10 - Edgy Eft but should work on any Debian based distro.

Ubuntu 6.10 Review

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Reviews
Ubuntu

If you're a Linux enthusiast you probably noticed what a great month we've had. Slackware 11.0 was released on the 3rd. Mandriva 2007 was released the same day and showed us how integrated XGL, Compiz and AIGLX could be. Fedora Core 6 was released on the 24th and brought us an amazing Gnome 2.16 desktop with fabulous artwork. Ubuntu 6.10 came on the 26th and we couldn't wait to review it.

Krita Team Seeking Artwork for User Gallery

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KDE

With Krita's recent 1.6 release enhancing its usability for professional artwork, the Krita team is looking into creating a gallery where Krita users can contribute their art made with it.

What lies ahead for Nvu

Filed under
Software

Nvu has been one of my favorite open source web editors since its 1.0 release in 2005. However its been more than a year since no new version has been released, so there had been speculation that the project had been canceled by Daniel Glazman. Last Monday I caught up with him in an IRC session, and I want to share some stuff that he discussed.

29.8% of XP users may move to Linux over Vista

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Linux

For the past couple of weeks there has been a poll active on the front-page of this site asking users what they feel their best option is with Vista poking it's glossy head over the horizon. Those of us who wish to remain legal have a crisis on our hands. So, the question: What will you do when Vista lands?

Why Chicago Chose Linux

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Linux

As the platform architect for the city of Chicago, Amy Niersbach had a decision to make. The city’s IT infrastructure needed some refreshing. Chicago wanted to rid itself of its vintage mainframes, and its aging Sun Solaris servers were costly to maintain. The Windy City needed a major migration. But to what?

kickoff season

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SUSE

openSUSE 10.2 beta 1 has recently been released and one of the highlights of this release is Kickoff – the revolutionary and redesigned KDE menu for openSUSE 10.2.

Linux distros Ubuntu, Trustix, and Suse accused of email spam

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Linux

Some Linux distributions - specifically Ubuntu, Trustix, and Suse - stand accused of sending potential email spam. This is because once signed up to their email lists, it is next to impossible for users to unsubscribe.

How are you syncing files across systems?

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Software

So I’ve been taking an informal poll of the sysadmins I know to find out how people are managing the synchronization of files across a server farm. Looks like there are three popular ways of handling this, which I’ll list in no particular order:

Open standards group to beat Microsoft at its own game

The first "dynamic coalition" resulting from the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) has vowed to get governments interested in adopting open standards for both hardware and software.

Raster image editors: A comparative look at the GIMP and Krita

Filed under
Software

With the release of Krita 1.6, it seems like a good time to compare the two big raster image editors for Linux. Coming as they do from the divergent GTK+ and KDE programming camps, it can be hard to assess the differences between the GIMP and Krita without being swayed by politics and emotion. Let's take a cold, hard look at the two, and compare the features side by side.

Explosions Reported at Building Housing PayPal

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Web

San Jose firefighters Tuesday night responded to reports of explosions from within a four-story building in San Jose that has also drawn responses from a bomb squad and a hazardous materials team.

Mark Shuttleworth: Consistent Packaging

Filed under
Ubuntu

A long, long time ago, packaging was an exciting idea. There were disputes over style and process, there was innovation. There were reasons to prefer .deb over .rpm over emerge and it’s binary packages…

Jono Bacon: Community Specs at the Ubuntu Developer Summit

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Ubuntu

On Saturday I fly out to San Francisco with Scott James Remnant for the Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS). As many of you will know, a bunch of specs have been suggested for the UDS. These are the specs:

How To Install VMware Server On Debian Sarge

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HowTos

This tutorial provides step-by-step instructions on how to install the free VMware Server (version 1.0.1) on a Debian Sarge system. With VMware Server you can create and run guest operating systems (virtual machines) such as Linux, Windows, FreeBSD, etc. under a host operating system. In this article we use Debian Sarge (3.1) as the host operating system.

OpenBSD 4.0 Review

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Reviews
BSD

In an era when the next edition of Microsoft Windows is pushed back more than a year, and popular GNU/Linux distributions are almost expected to have their release dates delayed by weeks or months, it's nice to know that at least one operating system releases on schedule without all kinds of showstopping bugs and problems. OpenBSD 4.0 was released on November 1 with its usual mix of new hardware support and enhanced operating system features.

Debian Weekly News - October 31st, 2006

Filed under
Linux

The Debian Weekly News seems to be back in business. Today they published this years 40th issue. I hope this doesn't mean the end of Ben's Debian Weekly Nudes, but nevertheless, here's a link to this week's official Debian Weekly newsletter.

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More in Tux Machines

FOSS in 3D Printing

  • Open source wifi enabled 3D printer controller Franklin speeds up with new release
    3D printing hit the mainstream a few years ago thanks in part to the open-source 3D printer market. The origins of this transition had to do with expiring patents held by the traditionally held commercial 3D printing companies. Since then, several small businesses have sprung up around the emerging low-cost 3D printer market. Some of these companies embraced the open-source mentality, while others are seeking shelter with patents.
  • Hackaday Prize Entry: Open-Source Myoelectric Hand Prosthesis
    Hands can grab things, build things, communicate, and we control them intuitively with nothing more than a thought. To those who miss a hand, a prosthesis can be a life-changing tool for carrying out daily tasks. We are delighted to see that [Alvaro Villoslada] joined the Hackaday Prize with his contribution to advanced prosthesis technology: Dextra, the open-source myoelectric hand prosthesis.
  • BCN3D Technologies releases open source files for BCN3D Sigma 3D printer
    As our readers will know, an important part of the 3D printing community is the idea of accessibility. Of course, it is more than just an idea, as everyday makers around the world share their 3D designs and models for free, and even 3D printing companies exercise an open-source philosophy with DIY 3D printers and accessible models. Recently, Barcelona based 3D printer developer BCN3D Technologies decided to further embrace the additive manufacturing open-source philosophy with their latest initiative, Open Source 360º. As part of the initiative, the company has announced that it will share all of its engineering, design, and fabrication information used in the manufacturing of their flagship product, the BCN3D Sigma 3D printer.
  • Shellmo: Aquatic 3D printed robot for fun and education
    Recently I came across a very interesting open hardware project called Shellmo. What caught my eye was that it's a 3D printed crustacean that seems to have no apparent real world use, though with a little creativity I can see educational implications. Shellmo is a unique, almost cartoon-like creatures that could captivate the imagination of children while at the same time affording them an opportunity to 3D print their own robot. With the current emphasis on STEM in education, Shellmo appears to be the kind of project that would stimulate student interest.

LibreOffice Liberation

  • Sun, sea, and open source: How Spain's Balearic islands are trying to turn into a tech paradise
    However, work remains to be done, especially on civil servants' desktops. "We started by replacing MSN Office", explains Villoslada. "Thanks to free office suite LibreOffice 5, we may overcome compatibility problems with documents coming in from different versions of MSN Office. We already have 1,000 Office licenses which are not necessary anymore, and we plan not to renew over 5,500 licenses purchased in 2007", he adds.
  • The Document Liberation Project: What we do
    While The Document Foundation is best known for LibreOffice, it also backs the Document Liberation Project. But what exactly is that? We’ve made a short video to explain all…

Kali Linux Alternative: BackBox Linux 4.6 Released With Updated Hacking Tools

BackBox Linux, a Kali Linux alternative, is here with its latest version i.e. BackBox Linux 4.6. Based on Ubuntu Linux, this hacking operating system is now available for download with updated hacking tools and Ruby 2.2. Read more

Chromebook and GNU/Linux

  • Turn Your Old Laptop into a Chromebook
    Once the drive is ready with bootable CloudReady, plug it into the target PC and boot the system. It may take a while for the system to boot into Chromium OS. Once booted, you will see the screen shown in Figure 3.
  • Running Linux and Chrome OS Together Using Crouton
    Leo Laporte is a longtime technology commentator and also the host of the show “The Screen Savers,” on the TWiT Netcast Network. In this video he explains how to install Linux on a Chromebook using Crouton, an open source tool developed by Google employee David Schneider.