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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 18 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ArchBang New Release 2015 Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 4:46am
Story Nokia Lumia 1020 Ubuntu OS Features Leaked Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 4:41am
Story The Good & Bad Of ZFS + HAMMER File-Systems On BSD Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 4:01am
Story BSD Community is Too Insular Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 3:57am
Story OpenPGP Smartcards and GNOME Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 3:32am
Story A small update to our "User Liberation" video Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 3:30am
Story Hats Off to Mozilla Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 3:28am
Story North Korea Linux 3.0 (Red Star OS) screenshot tour Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 2:32am
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 2:31am
Story LG tips new 4K TVs running WebOS 2.0 Rianne Schestowitz 03/01/2015 - 2:26am

Replacing Linux with Windows saves £1 million

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Microsoft A UK company says its switch from Linux to Windows will save it £1 million (almost $A2.3 million). How does that work?

Mandriva's New CEO’s first 30 days

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MDV We recently had to let some valuable members of staff go, notably amongst community members and distribution. It’s always a difficult decision to make and I would like to thank them for the contribution they made to Mandriva during all these years.

Working with multimedia files - Part 1

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HowTos This is the first of the three articles on how to use and manipulate multimedia formats: Flash, video and audio. In this first article, we will concentrate on Flash files.

Microsoft's Firefox surprise

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Moz/FF Microsoft's announcement of an OOXML plug-in for Firefox is one of those intriguing moments when a tiny piece of the future sprouts through the winter soil.

KNDISwrapper is half-done, but far from half-baked

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Software If any process ever cried out for a graphical interface, it is using NDISwrapper to enable wireless devices to run on GNU/Linux using Windows drivers. KNDISwrapper promises to remove much of the labor. But, so far, it only partly delivers on that promise by neglecting the hardest part of working with NDISwrapper.

Oracle contributes data integrity code to Linux kernel

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Linux Oracle has contributed data integrity protection code, partly developed with the hardware vendor Emulex, to the Linux kernel, the vendors announced Tuesday.

How Windows Users Are Changing Linux And What We Should Do About It

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linuxcanuck.wordpress: There is no doubt that people are leaving Windows, many going to the Mac and some are turning to Linux. This is partly due in part to dissatisfaction with Vista. The reason isn’t important. What is happening to the Linux community is.

The world's worst way to market Linux

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blogs.computerworld: At first, it sounds like a good idea. Nanchang, the capital of China's eastern Jiangxi province, is requiring Internet cafe operators to replace pirated server software with legal copies of Red Flag Linux or Windows Server. What's not to like?

Review: Crunchbang Linux

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Linux I decided to take a look at a new Ubuntu 8.10 derivative with the unlikely name "#! CrunchBang" Linux. CrunchBang can use all the GTK+ (GNOME) applications but replaces the GNOME Desktop/Windows Manager with the lightweight high performance Openbox WM.

10 of the Best Songbird Add-ons

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Software The first stable version of Songbird has been unleashed. Considered by many as the Firefox of media players due to its extensibility, this open source iTunes replacement has a bright future ahead.

Real World Benchmarks Of The EXT4 File-System

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Software With the EXT4 file-system being marked as stable in the forthcoming Linux 2.6.28 kernel, and some Linux distributions potentially switching to it as an interim step until the btrfs file-system is ready, we decided it was time to benchmark this journaled file-system for ourselves.

Linux netbooks look likely to save Australian government education election promise

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Linux The New South Wales (NSW) Department of Education and Training (DET) has today revealed its required specifications for custom-built laptops it intends to issue to students from grades 9 to 12 by the middle of 2009.

Ubuntu or Fedora?

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Linux Last week Fedora Linux released its latest version, Fedora 10. We take a look at how it stacks up against Ubuntu 8.10, released a month before.

Playing the numbers game 2008: number of Linux installations world wide

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liquidat.wordpress: The number of Linux users and installations is impossible to estimate. But there are several different statistical information available which can be used to at least get a rough idea of the number of Linux installations world wide.

Video: Fedora 10

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Linux Fedora 10 is out, and to celebrate that milestone, Fedora Project leader Paul Frields sat down with Red Hat community guru Greg DeKoenigsberg to talk about where Fedora’s been over the past five years and where it’s going.

A media player for the times: Songbird

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Software After about two years in the works, Pioneers of the Inevitable have released Songbird, a Mozilla-based music player, with which, POTI aims to do for music what Mozilla did with Firefox: provide an open source customizable multiplatform music player.

10 Ways To Trick Out Your Netbook for Free

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Software Netbooks are all the rage at the moment, with Asus predicting that it will sell 5 million of its Asus Eee PC netbooks by the end of this year. In this post, you’ll find 10 ways to pimp out your Windows or Linux netbook, without breaking the hardware resources bank.

Mingle brings group video chat to Linux

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Software The developers at Collabora have extended Jingle—a multimedia chat protocol for XMPP—so that it can support audio and video conversations with more than two participants. Support for this new XMPP extension, which they call Mingle, could eventually land in Empathy, the GNOME instant messaging client.

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