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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 22 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The past year for Joomla! Framework Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 8:13am
Story UK, Israel sign agreement on open standards, open source Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 8:08am
Story Linux Distro’s, FOSS and the advocates behind them – Some food for thought? Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 8:04am
Story OpenStack's top operating system: Ubuntu Linux Rianne Schestowitz 17/03/2014 - 3:34am
Story Popcorn Time Is Dead Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 11:25pm
Story Linux 3.15 To Support DRM Render-Nodes By Default Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:43pm
Story Meizu to allow other devices to run its Flyme OS? Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:36pm
Story March of the penguins: how we migrate from UNIX to Linux Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:18pm
Story Bitcoin Scoops Linux Media Award at CeBIT 2014 Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 10:16pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 16/03/2014 - 9:14pm

TrueCrypt 5.0 now with Linux GUI

Filed under
Software

masuran.org: The TrueCrypt foundation recently released TrueCrypt version 5.0, the latest version of the Open Source disk encryption software for Linux, Windows and Mac OS X. In this review I’ll use Ubuntu 7.10 to install TrueCrypt 5.0 on.

Marble's Secrets Part II - Walking In The Shoes Of Slartibartfast ...

Filed under
Software

kdedevelopers.org: Part II will show how Marble manages to provide the biggest bang for the byte when it comes to providing map data. It outlines how we managed to get the default map squeezed into the 10MB package that the Marble-Qt version gets shipped with.

PCLinuxOS Day 12 - Triple Boot Attempt

Filed under
PCLOS

ruminationsonthedigitalrealm.org: I wanted to upgrade Ubuntu to 7.10, to install Sabayon Linux and to install PCLinuxOS. Yes, this was going to be a triple boot laptop.

ASUS Eee PC rooted out of the box

Filed under
Security

risesecurity.org: We recently acquired an ASUS Eee PC. The first thing we did when we put our hands at the ASUS Eee PC was to test its security.

Gentoo 2008.0 feature requests closed

Filed under
Gentoo

The Release Engineering team has stopped taking feature requests for the upcoming 2008.0 release of Gentoo so that the release schedule can be met. Bug reports are still welcome however.

Also: KDE 4.0.1 Now in Portage

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • My Server Goes to FreeBSD !

  • R.I.P. Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu VS PCLinuxOS

Design your own desktop with Xfce 4.4

Filed under
Software

xubuntublog.wordpress: Xfce is just as customizable as KDE or GNOME, so I set myself a goal: make Xubuntu look like Windows Vista. Why? Because I can.

SCaLE 6x: I’m Here - Saturday in Review

Filed under
Linux

fedora-tutorials.com: Just left Jono Bacon’s presentation on “The future of the Linux Desktop”. He’s quite an awesome presenter. Afterward, I went down to the exhibit floor and got to say hi to Tom Callaway and actually met Thomas Chung from the Fedora Project. Both of these guys have such exuberance and joy, I love being part of the fedora project.

Also: Today's Keynote Streaming Live in 45 minutes

Can Mozilla be made more secure?

Filed under
Interviews
Moz/FF

computerworlduk.com: Window Snyder has the somewhat offbeat title of "chief security something-or-other" at Mozilla. In an interview, Snyder talked about the state of browser security today and how companies must work together.

Review Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon: Practicalities and working with it

Filed under
Ubuntu

seopher.com: I don't talk about Linux on this site much anymore because my focus has shifted somewhat but I can't avoid writing this post after the past 24 hours. What follows is a mixed review of Ubuntu from a very practical point of view.

They say Linux "Just Works". Yet for some it.....

Filed under
Linux

blogs.ittoolbox.com: I have said it myself and for me in my particular cases it is true. Linux "Just Works". I install it, I install the programs I wish to use and it "Just Works" for me. They install Linux, they want to do the same things that I do and they come up against a brick wall. Why would it be that Linux works for some people and doesn't work for others?

The dark side of open source: Hacking MySQL

Filed under
Software

itwire.com: Open source software advocates – like myself – will point out that a user can have confidence in the application’s integrity because the program code is readily viewable. However, not everyone who reads source code has pure intentions. Here’s how MySQL has been cracked in the past, and how you can keep safe.

The Ultimate Linux Password Management Guide Part 8 gnupg

Filed under
HowTos

maysville-linux-users-group: In this article, we will take a look at using gnupg, a common application already included on most Linux distributions for managing passwords. I am going to show you some tricks with using gnupg to manage passwords.

What linux needs

Filed under
Linux

keatoncasts.grotonma.net: I love linux. The concept, the implementation, the whole ‘geek in a candy store’ feeling you get when choosing which distribution to install next, it’s great. Unfortunately, it still has some major problems that could keep it from being a viable alternative to Windows for some people.

Flash Finally Restored in Linux

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

theoryoforangitivity.blogspot: So flash finally works again in 64-bit linux. For quite a while the new version of flash made it impossible for me use sites like Pandora and YouTube, but the repositories for Ubuntu finally have a new version of flashplugin-nonfree that fixes the problem.

Kgdb Light

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: "While this is probably one of the last days of the merge window, please still consider pulling the 'kgdb light' git tree," began Ingo Molnar, explaining "This is a slimmed-down and cleaned up version of KGDB that i've created out of the original patches that we submitted two weeks ago."

more new user experiences

Filed under
Linux
  • I Am A Linux User

  • Living With Linux, Day 2
  • 10 days in linux

few more howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Installing Instantbird 0.1 on Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon

  • HowTo Set Default Sound Card in Gentoo
  • Help, my motherboard doesn't see my SATA drives
  • Batch photo editing, The Linux way
  • SSHMenu - Conveniently Connect to Remote Machines From the Panel
  • How to invoke Firefox from Thunderbird under Linux

OSGGFG 3.1: Tee Wars

Filed under
Gaming

mrcopilot.blogspot: TeeWars is an online multi-player platform 2d shooter. Thats a mouthful, game play involves running, jumping, shooting and dying .. a lot.

TrueCrypt 5: Encrypt your drive in GUI

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: A few days ago TrueCrypt 5.0 has been released, a great tool for encrypting your hard drives. It can be used to encrypt existing partitions or create a virtual one located in a single file. In this article we cover the changes in version 5.0 and provide you some useful benchmarks.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME 3.25.3 Released, GTK Development

  • GNOME 3.25.3 Now Available
    GNOME 3.25.3 is now available as the latest stepping stone towards September's release of GNOME 3.26.
  • GNOME 3.26 Desktop Environment Development Continues, New Milestone Is Out Now
    Matthias Clasen has informed the community via an email announcement that the third milestone of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment is now ready for public testing. After a one day delay, GNOME 3.25.3 is now available, and it's the third development release of the upcoming GNOME 3.26 desktop environment that could be used by default in popular GNU/Linux distributions, such as the Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark) or Fedora 27, both due for release later this year. It brings a bunch of updates and new features to several of its components and apps.
  • Eight years since first release and still no usable theme?
    Well, let me be frank. Ever since gtk-3.0 I've been skeptical of it, especially of the theming aspect. In gtk-2 we had (and still have) many themes ranging from trash to excellent, almost every kind of taste could have been satisfied. Not so in gtk-3. First issue is constant changes to theming API, meaning that despite there being hundreds of themes, only handful of them actually work right :( And among them, I still have yet to find one that would work on my fairly usual 15,6″ laptop screen with 1366×768 px resolution. Basicaly I have two issues.

Microsoft Dirty Tricks and Entryism

Security: Windows Causes Chaos, Routers With Back Doors, Patching of UNIX/Linux

  • Traffic lights in Australia hit by WannaCry ransomware [Ed: Well, who uses Microsoft Windows to manage traffic?!?!]

    Radio station 3aw reports that dozens of pole based traffic calming measures are infected and that this came as a surprise to the local minister and Road Safety Camera Commissioner when radio reporters told him about it.

  • Honda shuts down factory after finding NSA-derived Wcry in its networks
    The WCry ransomware worm has struck again, this time prompting Honda Company to halt production in one of its Japan-based factories after finding infections in a broad swath of its computer networks, according to media reports. The automaker shut down its Sayama plant northwest of Tokyo on Monday after finding that WCry had affected networks across Japan, North America, Europe, China, and other regions, Reuters reported Wednesday. Discovery of the infection came on Sunday, more than five weeks after the onset of the NSA-derived ransomware worm, which struck an estimated 727,000 computers in 90 countries. The mass outbreak was quickly contained through a major stroke of good luck. A security researcher largely acting out of curiosity registered a mysterious domain name contained in the WCry code that acted as a global kill switch that immediately halted the self-replicating attack.
  • GhostHook: CyberArk finds new way to attack Windows 10

    Researchers at CyberArk Labs have discovered a new way of gaining access to the innards of Windows 10 64-bit systems that can bypass existing safeguards, including the kernel patch protection known as PatchGuard that Microsoft developed to improve system security.

  • John McAfee claims 'every router in America has been compromised' by hackers and spies

    Technology pioneer John McAfee believes that every home internet router in America is wide open to cyberattacks by criminal hackers and intelligence agencies. He makes the claim speaking after revelations from WikiLeaks that the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) targets the devices.

  • 'Stack Clash' Smashed Security Fix in Linux
    What's old is new again: an exploit protection mechanism for a known flaw in the Linux kernel has fallen to a new attack targeting an old problem.
  • Continuous defence against open source exploits
    Register for next month's expo for the public sector DevOps community to hear key speakers from the front line of public sector digital transformation and see the latest technologies at first hand. Andrew Martin, DevOps lead in a major government department, has been added to the line-up of speakers to talk about the importance of getting the approach to security right with open source software.
  • IoT goes nuclear: creating a ZigBee chain reaction [iophk: "use 6lowpan instead"]

    If plugging in an infected bulb is too much hassle, the authors also demonstrate how to take over bulbs by war-driving around in a car, or by war-flying a drone.

  • Passengers given a freight as IT glitch knocks out rail ticket machines

    The network of machines are operated by the individual franchises, but share a common infrastructure from German software company Scheidt and Bachmann.

OpenBSD Development News

  • OpenBSD now has Trapsleds to make life harder for ROPers
  • Historical: My first OpenBSD Hackathon

    I was a nobody. With some encouragement, enough liquid courage to override my imposter syndrome, and a few hours of mentoring, I'm now doing big projects. The next time you're sitting at a table with someone new to your field, ask yourself: how can you encourage them? You just might make the world better.

    Thank you Dale. And thank you Theo.

  • Finish the link-kit job
    We've had the linkkit components in the tree for a while, but it has taken nearly 20 rounds between rpe/tb/myself to get the last few bits finished. So that the link kit is cleanly used at reboot, but also fits in with the practices kernel developers follow.