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Saturday, 25 Nov 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Firefox 3.1 Alpha 1 now available for download

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: The first developer milestone of the next release of Firefox - code named Shiretoko Alpha 1 - is now available for download. Shiretoko is built on pre-release version of the Gecko 1.9.1 platform, which forms the core of rich internet applications such as Firefox. Please note that this release is intended for developers and testers only.

KDE 4.1 rocks the desktop

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: KDE 4.1 was finally released to the public today. After all the controversy since the release of KDE 4.0, I'm happy to announce that KDE 4.1 simply rocks.

KDE 4.1 Review: The Rocky Road of the New KDE

Filed under
KDE

earthweb.com: With its 4.1 release, KDE is taking few chances. While the 4.0 release's announcement emphasized excitement and significance, the tone of the announcement for 4.1 is more subdued. This time, the announcement talks about maturing technologies and underlying improvements, and the only claim is that the 4.1 desktop "can replace the KDE 3 shell for most casual users."

KDE 4.1 release ups free desktop ante

Filed under
KDE

techworld.com.au: After six months of development since the release of the much publicized 4.0, the KDE project has unveiled version 4.1 which includes many new bug fixes and feature enhancements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Survey: Economy Pushing Users to Open Source

  • Open-source sales growing despite economy
  • What has Grandma go to do with it?
  • 10 things you didn’t know you could do in Ubuntu
  • 5 things you didn’t know about linux kernel code metrics
  • Desktop Drapes: Another GNOME Wallpaper Changer
  • How to install Launchy on Ubuntu 8.04 (Hardy Heron)
  • How to speed up booting into GNOME
  • nUbuntu Development Kicking Off Again - Security LiveCD
  • The Geekiest Nighthmare
  • Rwanda: 5,000 Laptops for Students Arrive
  • Dear Mr. Shuttleworth
  • Stable kernel 2.6.25.13 Released
  • Dual Boot Ubuntu with Windows Vista/XP
  • LiMo kills Linux smartphone
  • Foxconn says ACPI issues are AMI’s fault
  • OLS 2008 wrap-up
  • Xataface lets non-technical users edit MySQL data
  • Recent customer wins for open source
  • Using Sysctl To Change Kernel Tunables On Linux
  • GPL Project Watch List for Week of 07/25

No! Wha…oooh…wow. Yes!

Filed under
Linux

ubuntuproductivity.com: Using linux feels a lot like listening to an undiscovered band; it’s the new band none of my friends have listened to. When they first experience it they want it. I have it. I feel special. You know the story…

Is Microsoft really any more trustworthy?

Filed under
Microsoft

practical-tech.com: Lately, Microsoft has been trying really, really hard to appear as open source’s best friend. All I can say is: “With friends like these, who needs enemies?”

Also: Could Microsoft actually be getting an open-source clue?

Implicit Save KDE vs GNOME

Filed under
Software

obso1337.org: One of the interesting things I learned at the last Ubuntu Developer Summit was the widespread use of implicit save in the GNOME environment. In many cases, implicit save makes a lot of sense and makes the configuration and interaction with options much more natural.

VPS Setup Part 1 - Update Ubuntu and Configure iptables

Filed under
HowTos

dailycupoftech.com: Since the whole VPS (Virtual Private Server) thing is going so well for me, I thought that I would let my readers know about some of the steps that I took to set it up. In this episode I will be talking about updating the initially installed image and configuring the linux firewall using iptables.

OpenOffice.org Tips and Tricks Part I

Filed under
OOo
HowTos

linuxplanet.com: This tutorial series will take you through some tips and tricks on migrating from MS Office to OpenOffice.org 2.4. You'll see how to replicate some of the functionality and features that are lacking in OpenOffice.org

Wine @ Work: Running MS Office and IE on Linux

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux-mag.com: In this article, I show you how to install Wine, Microsoft Office 2003, and Internet Explorer using my Red Hat derivative system (CentOS 5.1) as the host. You can give your system some Wine by compiling from source code, or by installing pre-compiled binaries from your distro’s repositories.

Package Management

Install extra packages on the ASUS Eee PC

  • Install extra packages on the ASUS Eee PC

  • Cracking Open the ASUS Eee 901 20G ultra-portable
  • More evidence of Microsoft "tying up" the Asus EeePC

ECS GeForce 8800GT

Filed under
Hardware
  • ECS GeForce 8800GT

  • Linux-friendly Beagle fetches $150
  • Diminutive green server for those with Linux leaning

Countdown to LinuxWorld - 7 Days...

Filed under
Linux
  • Countdown to LinuxWorld - 7 Days...

  • LinuxWorld 2008 features cloud, virtualization topics
  • Installfest at LinuxWorld could seed national program
  • LinuxWorld Expo Preview: Four Canonical and Ubuntu Linux Trends
  • LinuxWorld Conference & Expo Announces Finalists for Product Excellence Awards

A Quick Look at OpenOffice.org Writer 3.0 Beta 2

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta 2 is available in preparation for an official September release. Here are some quick first impressions of the Writer word-processor program.

KDE 4.1 Beta 2 on OpenSuSE 11.0

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

gordonazmo.wordpress: Decided to give OpenSuSE 11.0 a spin - wasn’t terribly amazed by the 10.3 release, but really curious to see what they did with KDE 4.x. Long story short, they did quite a nice job polishing it to look familiar to KDE 3.5.x users. Too ‘familiar’ and not enough 4.x’ish for my liking, but kudos to them - almost everything worked like you would expect it to work. Played around with it for like an hour, then decided to give KDE 4.1 Beta 2 a spin.

Will a $19.99 Ubuntu Succeed Where the Free Version Hasn’t?

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Canonical, the company behind the Linux distro Ubuntu, has collaborated with software distributor ValuSoft to sell a boxed version of Ubuntu 8.04 into Best Buy retail stores. Is $19.99 a better price point for Ubuntu than $0?

KDE 4.1: Good enough for ME

Filed under
KDE

jucato.org/blog: KDE 4.1 is coming! If all goes according to schedule, we should see it released in a day or so. I’ve migrated my main user to KDE 4 totally, except for a few KDE 3 apps here and there. I just want to share some of the things I’m loving in KDE 4 in general, and KDE 4.1 in particular. With screenshots, of course!

Economic clustering and Free Software release coordination

Mark Shuttleworth: I had the opportunity to present at the Linux Symposium on Friday, and talked further about my hope that we can improve the coordination and cadence of the entire free software stack. I tried to present both the obvious benefits and the controversies the idea has thrown up.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: VirtualBox, TeX Live Cockpit, Mailspring, Qt, Projects, and Maintainers

  • VirtualBox 5.2.2 Brings Linux 4.14 Fixes, HiDPI UI Improvements
    The Oracle developers behind VM VirtualBox have released a new maintenance build in the VirtualBox 5.2 series that is a bit more exciting than their usual point releases.
  • TeX Live Cockpit
    I have been working quite some time on a new front end for the TeX Live Manager tlmgr. Early versions have leaked into TeX Live, but the last month or two has seen many changes in tlmgr itself, in particular support for JSON output. These changes were mostly driven by the need (or ease) of the new frontend: TLCockpit.
  • Mailspring – A New Open Source Cross-Platform Email Client
    Mailspring is a fork of the now discontinued Nylas Mail client. It does, however, offer a much better performance, and is built with a native C++ sync engine instead of JavaScript. According to the development team, the company is sunsetting further development of Mailspring. Mailspring offers virtually all the best features housed in Nylas Mail, and thanks to its native C++ sync engine it uses fewer dependencies which results in less lag and a reduction in RAM usage by 50% compared to Nylas Mail.
  • Removing Qt 4 from Debian testing (aka Buster): some statistics
    We started filing bugs around September 9. That means roughly 11 weeks, which gives us around 8 packages fixed a week, aka 1.14 packages per day. Not bad at all!
  • Products Over Projects
    However, projects are not the only way of funding and organizing software development. For instance, many companies that sell software as a product or a service do not fund or organize their core product/platform development in the form of projects. Instead, they run product development and support using near-permanent teams for as long as the product is sold in the market. The budget may vary year on year but it is generally sufficient to fund a durable, core development organization continuously for the life of the product. Teams are funded to work on a particular business problem or offering over a period of time; with the nature work being defined by a business problem to address rather than a set of functions to deliver. We call this way of working as “product-mode” and assert that it is not necessary to be building a software product in order to fund and organize software development like this.
  • Why we never thank open source maintainers

    It is true that some of you guys can build a tool in a hackathon, but maintaining a project is a lot more difficult than building a project. Most of the time they are not writing code, but [...]

today's howtos

Tizen News

Mozilla Firefox Quantum

  • Can the new Firefox Quantum regain its web browser market share?
    When Firefox was introduced in 2004, it was designed to be a lean and optimized web browser, based on the bloated code from the Mozilla Suite. Between 2004 and 2009, many considered Firefox to be the best web browser, since it was faster, more secure, offered tabbed browsing and was more customizable through extensions than Microsoft’s Internet Explorer. When Chrome was introduced in 2008, it took many of Firefox’s best ideas and improved on them. Since 2010, Chrome has eaten away at Firefox’s market share, relegating Firefox to a tiny niche of free software enthusiasts and tinkerers who like the customization of its XUL extensions. According to StatCounter, Firefox’s market share of web browsers has fallen from 31.8% in December 2009 to just 6.1% today. Firefox can take comfort in the fact that it is now virtually tied with its former arch-nemesis, Internet Explorer and its variants. All of Microsoft’s browsers only account for 6.2% of current web browsing according to StatCounter. Microsoft has largely been replaced by Google, whose web browsers now controls 56.5% of the market. Even worse, is the fact that the WebKit engine used by Google now represents over 83% of web browsing, so web sites are increasingly focusing on compatibility with just one web engine. While Google and Apple are more supportive of W3C and open standards than Microsoft was in the late 90s, the web is increasingly being monopolized by one web engine and two companies, whose business models are not always based on the best interests of users or their rights.
  • Firefox Nightly Adds CSD Option
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: Firefox 57 is awesome — so awesome that I’m finally using it as my default browser again. But there is one thing it the Linux version of Firefox sorely needs: client-side decoration.