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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora 20 and Its Historical Significance Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 10:58am
Story Red Hat's Cloud Success in Government Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 10:37am
Blog entry Tuxmachines.org for sale (update) srlinuxx 4 11/11/2013 - 10:18am
Poll Multi-story News Pages? (Multiple links/lists in one page) Roy Schestowitz 2 11/11/2013 - 4:07am
Story Dutch cyber security centre: Linux suitable for businesses Roy Schestowitz 10/11/2013 - 6:57pm
Blog entry This is "See Ya Around" srlinuxx 6 10/11/2013 - 4:55pm
Story Life on the Forked Road Roy Schestowitz 10/11/2013 - 12:40pm
Story Chrome Clamps Down, Bitcoin Vulnerability & More… Roy Schestowitz 10/11/2013 - 11:38am
Story "Good things happen during the weekend" OpenMandriva LX is Coming! Roy Schestowitz 10/11/2013 - 11:31am
Story Updated NVIDIA GeForce Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux With Team Fortress 2 Roy Schestowitz 09/11/2013 - 12:32pm

Federal Government Votes for Open Source

Filed under
OSS

press release: The Federal Open Source Alliance, an organization devoted to open source education, today announced the results of its “Federal Open Source Referendum” study, the first annual report designed to identify current open source adoption rates and trends in the Federal market. The study reveals Feds’ increasing appetite for open source – 71 percent of respondents note that their agency can benefit from open source.

PCLinuxOS improving its community

Filed under
PCLOS

abhay-techzone.blogspot: Now this is one area where Ubuntu scores heavily over PCLOS. Agreed Ubuntu has got the greatest community amongst all Linux Distributions ( gentoo users may contest this ), however, PCLOS is improving on its community and improving very rapidly.

antiX M-7, The Fat-free Mepis

Filed under
Linux

junauza.blogspot.com: Simply Mepis is a Linux newbie’s dream. It is known for its ease-of-use and its exceptional hardware detection. A new lightweight flavour of Mepis which is intended for older hardware was released recently. It is called AntiX with a code name “Lysistrata”, and so I quickly jumped into trying it out.

Linux, is it ready for the desktop/laptop?

Filed under
Linux

htmlfixit: Having used Linux on servers for many years now, I’m always keen to see if it has progressed enough for me to use as my “daily driver” desktop/laptop OS. The test this time was on a NEC Centrino Laptop. I figured I’d stick with a desktop OS that has as much in common with CENTOS/RHEL as possible. To that end I’ve based this on Fedora Core 7.

Drupal Wins Packtpub Overall 2007 Open Source CMS Award

Filed under
Drupal

packtpub.com: After three intense months of voting, Packt Publishing can today announce that Drupal has won the Overall 2007 Open Source CMS Award. With 18,000 votes on Packt’s website, coupled with the expert opinions from a panel of judges, Drupal succeeds Joomla! as the overall winner and receives a cheque for $5,000.

The Jonney Machine

Filed under
Hardware

forbes: Intel pushed and prodded. Microsoft came in right at the end. How Taiwan's Asustek built its cheap laptop for grown-ups.

Also: Asus Eee PC Full Retail Review Showcase

today's ubuntu headlines

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • How To Install Miro Public Preview 3 (0.9.9.9) on Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu to get visual refresh with Hardy Heron
  • How to Secure Ubuntu With AppArmor
  • Turning the world on its head: running VMware on Ubuntu
  • Is Ubuntu really where it needs to be?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How to install Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) in Parallels Desktop for OS X

  • A survey of existing Linux patents
  • How to connect Motorola V3X to ubuntu 7.04 trough USB
  • Tips and tricks: Gentoo Linux on a Samsung Q45 laptop
  • OOo: Another way to tweak labels, and save the format
  • 1-Click install of GIMP 2.4 on OpenSUSE
  • HP releases multi-level security services for RHEL5
  • Intel and OLPC: Friends that Fight like Brothers
  • GPLv3, bug fixes, and complexity

Why people insist on using /boot

Filed under
Linux

farragut.flameeyes: One of the strangely quite common type of support request involved to some extent the standalone /boot partition. But why people insist on using a standalone /boot partition?

Flock Plugins On Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

matt hartley: So you just downloaded Flock, fell in love with it and believe this is the browser for you. Previously, you already installed all the preferred plugins for Firefox, yet Flock does not see them on Ubuntu?

Also: Simple Firefox optimizations that really matter
And: Mozilla Firefox 2.0.0.9 Now Available

No worries: head of MEPIS Linux is fine

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Users of the popular Linux distribution MEPIS were getting worried about the distribution's leader, who had been rather quiet lately.

Also: MEPIS 7.0 Beta6: The Final Round of Updates

Nokia N810 First Thoughts Review

Filed under
Hardware

tabletpcreview.com: The Nokia N810 is a traditional handheld that will be on the market soon. This is the first in Nokia's Internet Tablet series of devices to include an integrated sliding keyboard and a GPS receiver. It was on display at a tradeshow I attended, so I was able to get some time with this model and put together my first thoughts on it.

Ubuntu 7.10 is a real contender

Filed under
Ubuntu

stuart.amanzi.co.nz: I had last tried the 7.4 release on my new notebook without much luck as the hardware was a lot newer than the operating system. I wasn’t too hopeful of having much luck installing 7.10 either on my HP 6910p notebook, but a funny thing happened - it just worked!

Interview With Pamela Jones, Editor of Groklaw

Filed under
Interviews

datamation: When Pamela Jones, better known as PJ, started Groklaw, a Web site devoted to covering and explaining legal cases of interest to the Free Software and Open Source communities, she preferred to remain anonymous and showed no desire to become well-known. Groklaw nevertheless became extremely popular very quickly. In this Q & A, she explains how Groklaw operates, what its purposes include, and where it is likely to head in the future.

What The Google Phone Could Do For Linux

Filed under
Linux

Forbes: Even the best technology needs a sugar daddy. Seven years ago, Linux got just that when IBM said it would put $1 billion on the then-nascent open-source operating system, pushing the software into the corporate mainstream. Now the same could be about to happen for Linux with the mobile phone, with Google set to give Linux a major endorsement this November.

Why Novell is like Napster-era Metallica

Filed under
SUSE

c|net blogs: Remember back when Metallica isolated the majority of their fan base with their over-the-top stance against Napster and what it did to the band and the fans that supported them for all those years? That's how I am starting to think of Novell.

November 2007 (#144) Issue of Linux Gazette

Filed under
Linux

This month's Linux Gazette is online and ready to read. Some highlights include Virtualization made Easy, Slow Receivers in a Distributed Data Management System, and Escaping the Clutches of Web 2.0.

Book review: The Essential Blender

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The Essential Blender from No Starch Press is both a reference and instructional guide to Blender, the open source 3-D modeling, rendering, and animation tool. Despite a few flaws, it's a good resource for those struggling with the software.

Book review: Fedora 7 Unleashed

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat Magazine: Have you ever had deja vu? I’ve been reading the new Fedora™ 7 Unleashed book by Andrew and Paul Hudson, and I’ve had that feeling several times.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Someone is putting lots of work into hacking Github developers [Ed: Dan Goodin doesn't know that everything is under attack and cracking attempts just about all the time?]
    Open-source developers who use Github are in the cross-hairs of advanced malware that has steal passwords, download sensitive files, take screenshots, and self-destruct when necessary.
  • Security Orchestration and Incident Response
    Technology continues to advance, and this is all a changing target. Eventually, computers will become intelligent enough to replace people at real-time incident response. My guess, though, is that computers are not going to get there by collecting enough data to be certain. More likely, they'll develop the ability to exhibit understanding and operate in a world of uncertainty. That's a much harder goal. Yes, today, this is all science fiction. But it's not stupid science fiction, and it might become reality during the lifetimes of our children. Until then, we need people in the loop. Orchestration is a way to achieve that.

Leftover: Development (Linux)

  • Swan: Better Linux on Windows
    If you are a Linux user that has to use Windows — or even a Windows user that needs some Linux support — Cygwin has long been a great tool for getting things done. It provides a nearly complete Linux toolset. It also provides almost the entire Linux API, so that anything it doesn’t supply can probably be built from source. You can even write code on Windows, compile and test it and (usually) port it over to Linux painlessly.
  • Lint for Shell Scripters
    It used to be one of the joys of writing embedded software was never having to deploy shell scripts. But now with platforms like the Raspberry Pi becoming very common, Linux shell scripts can be a big part of a system–even the whole system, in some cases. How do you know your shell script is error-free before you deploy it? Of course, nothing can catch all errors, but you might try ShellCheck.
  • Android: Enabling mainline graphics
    Android uses the HWC API to communicate with graphics hardware. This API is not supported on the mainline Linux graphics stack, but by using drm_hwcomposer as a shim it now is. The HWC (Hardware Composer) API is used by SurfaceFlinger for compositing layers to the screen. The HWC abstracts objects such as overlays and 2D blitters and helps offload some work that would normally be done with OpenGL. SurfaceFlinger on the other hand accepts buffers from multiple sources, composites them, and sends them to the display.
  • Collabora's Devs Make Android's HWC API Work in Mainline Linux Graphics Stack
    Collabora's Mark Filion informs Softpedia today about the latest work done by various Collabora developers in collaboration with Google's ChromeOS team to enable mainline graphics on Android. The latest blog post published by Collabora's Robert Foss reveals the fact that both team managed to develop a shim called drm_hwcomposer, which should enable Android's HWC (Hardware Composer) API to communicate with the graphics hardware, including Android 7.0's version 2 HWC API.

today's howtos

Reports From and About Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF)