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Friday, 01 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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A survey of Linux file managers

Filed under
Software

Linux file manager ontogeny encapsulates the history of GNU/Linux. File managers began as command-line and generic graphical tools and progressed to desktop-specific ones, gaining sophistication along the way, with mouse controls, for example, replacing buttons. Today, the more than a dozen options highlighted here will suit users with widely varied interests.

Glipper will make GNOME much more usable

Filed under
Software

One key feature GNOME has lacked, in comparison to KDE, is a clipboard manager like KDE's Klipper. That's now about to change, thanks to the efforts of a project called "Glipper."

Howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Linux play encrypted DVDs

  • Recover Data from a Damaged hard disk using dd_rhelp
  • Ubuntu Quicktip - adding extra fonts to your Ubuntu install
  • Open Source Monitoring 101- A Refresher
  • Mount your widows Partitions and make it read and writable
  • Alternate Desktop Manager - Xfce / Fluxbox / Enlightenment / Blackbox / Openbox / Afterstep / FVWM / WindowMaker
  • beryl + ubuntu edgy on dell latitude d600

Naming Apache Geronimo JNDI and connection pools for Java resource, Part 2

Filed under
News

This article, the second installment in this series, shows you how Apache Geronimo, JNDI, and Java Message Service (JMS) resource groups interrelate. Plus you'll learn how to build a JMS resource connection and access it in a simple Geronimo application using JNDI.

Neuros OSD Review

Filed under
Hardware

The Neuros OSD promises a lot - it claims to be the first open source Linux-based embedded media center and it "records video and links your PC, portables and entertainment center". Bold claims, but can it live up to them? Linuxlookup.com has a two page review of the Neuros OSD from both a developer and user perspective.

Setting Up A PXE Install Server For Multiple Linux Distributions With Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to set up a PXE (short for preboot execution environment) install server with Ubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft). A PXE install server allows your client computers to boot and install a Linux distribution over the network, without the need of burning Linux iso images onto a CD/DVD, boot floppy images, etc. This is handy if your client computers do not have CD or floppy drives, or if you want to set up multiple computers at the same time (e.g. in a large enterprise), or simply because you want to save the money for the CDs/DVDs. In this article I show how to configure a PXE server that allows you to boot multiple distributions: Ubuntu Edgy/Dapper, Debian Etch/Sarge, Fedora Core 6, CentOS 4.4, OpenSuSE 10.2, and Mandriva 2007.

Is KDE 4 The Desktop Answer?

Filed under
KDE

I just read an article about this in ComputerWorld Australia. The article is an interview and talks about some of what will be new in KDE 4. Having used KDE for close to 10 years now, I am clearly a fan but I am not sure KDE 2, 3, 4 or 27 is the answer.

Disgruntled Debian developers delay Etch

Filed under
Linux

Debian GNU/Linux 4.0, codenamed Etch, had been due to arrive by December 4, 2006, but it's been delayed because some developers have deliberately slowed down their work.

Some Howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install and use SSH Server on Ubuntu 6.10

  • Local DNS Cache for Faster Browsing on Ubuntu
  • How to Backup Kontact

Learn 10 good UNIX usage habits

Filed under
Linux

Adopt 10 good habits that improve your UNIX command line efficiency - and break away from bad usage patterns in the process. This article takes you step-by-step through several good, but too often neglected, techniques for command-line operations. Learn about common errors and how to overcome them, so you can learn exactly why these UNIX habits are worth picking up.

Is Linux Ready for Small Biz?

Filed under
Linux

Many small businesses have avoided Linux for a variety of reasons: not enough applications, complexity of installation or that it requires too much technical know-how to run. The technology has matured over many years, which raises the question: how valid are these considerations today?

Why now is the best time to switch to linux

Filed under
Linux

Today’s Linux is leaps and bounds ahead of yesterday’s. It is absolutely amazing to see how far Linux has come in 10, 5, and even 1 year ago. It is now a full featured lock and load desktop operating system that easily rivals windows. Now if we could only remove the fear factor that I discussed earlier get people to see the light.

Sabayon Linux 3.2 Mini Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Sabayon Linux is a relatively new distribution that is known for its looks with the inclusion of AIGLX, XGL, and Beryl. After the recent release of Sabayon Linux 3.2, the Mini Edition of the 3.2 branch has now been updated. Updates include newer ATI and NVIDIA proprietary display drivers, full NTFS read/write support out-of-the-box, and many other package updates and changes. It also looks very nice from the desktop side with its LiveCD. The Screenshots.

Immune your files from accidental deletion

Filed under
HowTos

Okay, when you accidentally type
rm LoveLetterFromJane.txt
Your file are gone, can’t resume it at trash, there are no trash, the document are important to you! Oh My God!! you smack your box!

Jono Bacon: Features vs. Freedom

Filed under
Ubuntu

Recently there has been a lot of discussion bubbling up regarding the possibility that Ubuntu will ship proprietary 3D drivers by default for some video cards. My aim here is not to discuss the specifics of that decision, which is still being fleshed out and ratified, but to instead define my views on the bigger picture behind the discussion - features vs. freedom.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 182

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Distributions in 2006

  • News: Fedora revamps RPM, KNOPPIX 5.1, Debian release update, Arch Linux Office Install CD, Dreamlinux interview
  • Released last week: SabayonLinux 3.2 "miniEdition", VectorLinux 5.8
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2007, K12LTSP Linux 6.0
  • New distributions: Kuliax
  • Reader comments

Read more in this year's final issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Review: Thunderbird 2.0 Beta 1 Adds New Look And Feel

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla, the developer of the free Thunderbird e-mail client, has taken a good program and made it better with the release of the version 2.0 beta 1. It is rare that a beta release is not buggy, clunky, and generally a mess -- especially when, as word has it, the developers are changing the code base -- but I was pleasantly surprised by its stability and the dearth of issues.

HOWTO compile SuperTux 0.3.0 (Milestone 1.9) on Ubuntu Edgy

Filed under
HowTos

SuperTux 0.3.0 has been out for hours now. What are you waiting for? Debian (unstable) and Ubuntu (Dapper or Edgy) users:

Linux Security: A Big Edge Over Windows

Filed under
Linux

Linux is better at locking down a computer than Windows. The Linux OS uses configuration settings and user permissions to a much more efficient degree than the Windows administrator account.

Open Source Investment Rose 131% in 2006

Filed under
OSS

The amount of venture capital funding invested in the Linux and open source-related vendors tracked by Computer Business Review rose 131% in 2006, vastly outpacing the IT market as a whole.

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July 2016 issue of The PCLinuxOS Magazine released

The PCLinuxOS Magazine staff is pleased to announce the release of the July 2016 issue. With the exception of a brief period in 2009, The PCLinuxOS Magazine has been published on a monthly basis since September, 2006. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is a product of the PCLinuxOS community, published by volunteers from the community. The magazine is lead by Paul Arnote, Chief Editor, and Assistant Editor Meemaw. The PCLinuxOS Magazine is released under the Creative Commons Attribution- NonCommercial-Share-Alike 3.0 Unported license, and some rights are reserved. In the July 2016 issue: * Seven Years Later: A Look Back * Installing A Seeburg 1000 On PCLinuxOS * ms_meme's Nook: Anytime * PCLinuxOS Family Member Spotlight: tuxlink * GIMP Tutorial: Engraved Text * Game Zone: Funklift * PCLinuxOS Recipe Corner * Tip Top Tips: A Simple HTTP Server * PCLinuxOS Puzzled Partitions * And much more inside! This month’s magazine cover image was designed by Meemaw. Download the PDF (8.3 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=2016-07.pdf Download the EPUB Version (6.6 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201607epub.epub Download the MOBI Version (7.6 MB) http://pclosmag.com/download.php?f=201607mobi.mobi Visit the HTML Version http://pclosmag.com/html/enter.html

4MLinux 18.0 Distro Released with Support for LibreOffice 5.2, Thunderbird 45.1

4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki has just informed Softpedia today, July 1, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the final release of the 4MLinux 18.0 operating system. Read more

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • Not Love
    I had seen GNU/Linux once before in my life. At a previous school, the husband of one of the teachers installed it on a PC in my presence. He couldn’t get it working…. Still, I read that GNU/Linux did not crash. I needed that. I was willing to make the effort to download and install GNU/Linux if I could have only that. Our Internet connection was a few KB/s on dial-up… I spent two weekends and five evenings downloading an .iso CD-image with FileZilla or something on a Mac in the lab. I had never burned a CD before but tried once copying the file to the CD. That wouldn’t boot. I discovered CD imaging… So, on the second try, I had a CD that would boot on the machines. I first did one machine and it wouldn’t start X. Having never seen X before, this was a problem but it turned out all I needed was the scanning frequencies for the CRT in a configuration file. Google helped me find those for each of my five different kinds of monitors. Suddenly, the PCs were useful with GNU/Linux.
  • Linux Under the Hood: Silence of the RAM
    Now that I see the events of the last week chronicled clearly in front of my very eyes, maybe the disparaging old junk man was right after all. I’m shameless enough to admit my own idiocy as long as it leads to learning from my mistakes. Maybe Linux isn’t rocket science, but installing RAM was sure beginning to feel like it.
  • Check out our new issue plus win an ebook bundle!
  • 30 days in a terminal: Day 10 — The experiment is over
    When I set out to spend 30 days living entirely in a Linux terminal, I knew there was a distinct possibility I would fail utterly. I mean, 30 days? No GUI software? No Xorg? Just describing it sounds like torture. And torture it was. Mostly. Some moments, though, were pretty damned amazing. Not amazing enough to help me reach my 30-day goal, mind you. I fell short—only making it to day 10.
  • Bad Voltage Episode 70 Has Been Released: Delicious Amorphous Tech Bubble
  • Tokyo: Automotive Linux Summit
    Engineers will gather in Tokyo July 13-14 for the annual Automotive Linux Summit, a conference where auto-industry stakeholders discuss the adoption of an open-source Linux-based platform for in-vehicle infotainment. The two-day summit brings together automotive systems engineers, Linux experts, developers and other players.
  • Oxenfree, an adventure game with supernatural elements, available on Linux
    This well-received indie title has been ported over to Linux. Combining plenty of elements of 80s teen movies and packaging them in a polished adventure, Oxenfree may be worth checking out if you’re a fan of adventure games.
  • Space station management game, The Spatials: Galactology, is confirmed to be coming for Linux
    This is an expanded and reimagined version of the management sim, The Spatials. It’s yet to be released but the developers have confirmed that a Linux version is in the works.
  • Red Hat Storage VP sees different uses for Ceph, Gluster
    Red Hat Storage showed off updates to its Ceph and Gluster software and laid out its strategy for working with containers at this week’s Red Hat Summit in San Francisco.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian