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Sunday, 25 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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How Linux Helped Chickens, Environmentalists, and a Pirate

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: I’ve worked with a Japanese company called Plat’Home, maker of small, tough, eco-friendly servers, for the past nine months or so. They ran a contest this summer about ideas. They called it the “Will Linux Work? Contest.” They collected ideas from Linux lovers on how they would use Linux in interesting and sometimes challenging ways.

Hell freezes over: Ballmer considering open-source browser

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

cnet.com: I fully expected to die never having heard a positive word escape Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's lips with regard to open source. Based on Ballmer's comments made in Sydney on Friday, however, it may be time for me to start picking out my funeral arrangements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Why Microsoft fears Linux

  • What Outsourcers Can Learn from Open-Source Communities
  • Fedora 10 preview release shines like a star
  • Is Sun taking open source a little too far?
  • Open Sources Episode 2: This time we pay attention
  • Follow The Netbook Road
  • Netbook conundrum -- Windows or Linux?
  • Sun still radiating open source
  • Fork you very much: Gist brings revision tracking to pastes
  • Road-Tripping With Linux
  • DRM firmware adopted by mobile Linux stack
  • OIN: Making the world 'safe for Linux'
  • New critical vulnerabilities in VLC media player
  • Debian Linux
  • Decided to stay on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Mandriva Testcases
  • The Case for a New Open Source License
  • Dell Inspiron Mini 9 battery consumption test
  • Kiss Firefox EULA goodbye
  • At ApacheCon, Microsoft jumps on open source bandwagon

10 Cool Linux Apps You Maybe Didn’t Know About

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Software

makeuseof.com: Ubuntu comes pre-installed with a wealth of apps - covering almost every task you need to do, while still managing to fit on a CD. Are you ready to discover some pretty cool apps that don’t get the attention they deserve? Let’s check them out.

GNU/Linux is user-friendly - and logical too

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Linux

itwire.com: Over at iTWire, we are often in the position where we disagree with a fellow writer and say so. This morning, I found my colleague Davey Winder's piece "Opinion: why Linux sucks at being user friendly" to be a litle too general to pass without comment.

some howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Comparison of Python virtual machines

  • What to do if every kernel update break your bootloader settings
  • auto-apt : on-demand package installer
  • 3 More Things Every Good Linux Adminstrator Knows
  • Automatically mount encrypted filesystems at login with pam_mount
  • Tables in OpenOffice.org Impress: New and Unstylish
  • Why Firefox Rocks on Linux: Great Firefox Tricks, Part III
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux
  • More Quick Ways To Find CPU Bottlenecks On Linux

Amarok Insider - Issue 13 Released

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Software

kde.org: Issue 13 of Amarok Insider, the official Amarok newsletter is out. It discusses the evolution of Amarok's interface, reveals the release plans, covers some of the biggest features of the upcoming version 2.0, and much more. Download links for Windows and OS X versions of the Amarok 2.0 beta are included.

Fluxbox - Why You Might Want to Try It

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Fluxbox

fosswire.com: When you think about desktop environments on Linux/Unix, you’ll probably think GNOME and KDE. Rather than using an integrated suite of programs, you can simply use a standalone window manager and then just run any of the apps you want. Fluxbox is such a window manager.

Wi-Fi Linux network bug found, fixed

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Software

blogs.computerworld: These days, most of us can use our Wi-Fi cards on Linux using native drivers. Some of us, though, are still stuck with using Windows drivers on Linux. This kludge is usually done by using the Windows driver with NDISwrapper. Unfortunately, it's recently been discovered that there's a crack in the kludge.

IBM Lotus Adds Mac OS X, Ubuntu Linux Support To Symphony Apps

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Software

crn.com: Expanding its efforts to offer an alternative to Microsoft's Office desktop applications, IBM is making its free Lotus Symphony office productivity suite available for Apple's Mac OS X and Canonical's Ubuntu Linux.

Creative Gives In, They Open-Source Their X-Fi Driver

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OSS

phoronix.com: The Sound Blaster X-Fi sound card driver for Linux from Creative Labs was awful. That's simply the nicest way to put it. However, Creative Labs today has finally turned this situation around and they have open-sourced the code to this notorious driver.

Collabora funds development of open source video editor PiTiVi

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Software

linux.com: Open source multimedia specialist Collabora is hiring developers to work on the nonlinear video editor PiTiVi. The Cambridge, UK-based company contributes heavily to the GStreamer media framework and other GStreamer-dependent projects, so PiTiVi is a natural fit -- and it fills a sorely needed niche on the Linux desktop.

openSUSE 11.1 countdown

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SUSE

dev-loki.blogspot: The openSUSE release countdown banners have been updated, with new languages (pt_BR, hu, id, bg, jp and wa) as well as counting down to 11.1. And as it is rendered on the server, it always points to the right number of remaining days before 11.1 release.

More Work On Red Hat's Wayland Project

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Software

phoronix.com: Since publishing the world's first look at Wayland, a nano display server for Linux with an integrated compositing manager, there has been much interest in this emerging Red Hat project. While this project is still in its infancy, below are a few more notes about recent changes with Wayland.

Will Linux ever be a mainstream desktop play?

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: I strongly suspect that there are inherent tradeoffs between the flexibility and choice associated with open source and the unified approach (epitomized by Apple) that tends to be associated with good user interface design. But the bigger issue with mainstreaming the Linux PC has nothing to do with design and everything with where we are in technology history.

No More Doom And Gloom, Please

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: It seems that more and more bloggers are writing doom and gloom articles or attention grabbing headlines to that effect. Recently one blogger has taken it upon himself to write about the virtues of Windows 7 and make pronouncements that it will kill Linux on netbooks and “instant on” computers. Others write that the success of Ubuntu will kill other distros and poses a threat to Linux as a whole. I say, enough already.

Why Linux sucks at being user friendly

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Forget the OS wars, Apple and Microsoft do not need to wield any weapons today. Linux seems to be doing a good enough job of shooting itself in the foot when it comes to appealing to your average PC user.

Mac OS X 10.5 vs. Ubuntu 8.10 Benchmarks

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Linux

phoronix.com: Last week we published Ubuntu 7.04 to 8.10 benchmarks from a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 and had found Ubuntu's performance degraded peculiarly over the past year and a half. This time around we're switching out the hardware we're testing on to Intel's newer Core 2 series and we're comparing the performance of the x86 and x86_64 editions of Ubuntu 8.10 against Apple's Mac OS X 10.5.5.

The Future of Gnome

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: Neil Patel of Canonical recently posted an outline of the new user interface concepts that Gnome developers envisioned during the “Gnome User Experience” conference in Boston a couple of weeks ago. But are the concepts a good move?

What Linux Needs to Stay Competitive

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: For some time, Windows Vista’s perceived failure has given Linux a free ride. It has been nice, but it will not remain. From the looks of things, Windows 7 will be a solid release. With this competition, what does Linux need to stay competitive?

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More in Tux Machines

Introducing the potential new Ubuntu Studio Council

Back in 2016, Set Hallström was elected as the new Team Lead for Ubuntu Studio, just in time for the 16.04 Xenial Long Term Support (LTS) release. It was intended that Ubuntu Studio would be able to utilise Set’s leadership skills at least up until the next LTS release in April 2018. Unfortunately, as happens occasionally in the world of volunteer work, Set’s personal circumstances changed and he is no longer able to devote as much time to Ubuntu Studio as he would like. Therefore, an IRC meeting was held between interested Ubuntu Studio contributors on 21st May 2017 to agree on how to fill the void. We decided to follow the lead of Xubuntu and create a Council to take care of Ubuntu Studio, rather than continuing to place the burden of leadership on the shoulder of one particular person. Unfortunately, although the result was an agreement to form the first Ubuntu Studio Council from the meeting participants, we all got busy and the council was never set up. Read more

today's leftovers

  • My Experience with MailSpring on Linux
    On the Linux Desktop, there are quite a few choices for email applications. Each of these has their own pros and cons which should be weighed depending on one’s needs. Some clients will have MS Exchange support. Others do not. In general, because email is reasonably close to free (and yes, we can thank Hotmail for that) it has been a difficult place to make money. Without a cash flow to encourage developers, development has trickled at best.
  • Useful FFMPEG Commands for Managing Audio and Video Files
  • Set Up A Python Django Development Environment on Debian 9 Stretch Linux
  • How To Run A Command For A Specific Time In Linux
  • Kubuntu 17.10 Guide for Newbie Part 7
  •  
  • Why Oppo and Vivo are losing steam in Chinese smartphone market
    China’s smartphone market has seen intense competition over the past few years with four local brands capturing more than 60 percent of sales in 2017. Huawei Technologies, Oppo, Vivo and Xiaomi Technology recorded strong shipment growth on a year-on-year basis. But some market experts warned that Oppo and Vivo may see the growth of their shipments slow this year as users become more discriminating.
  • iPhones Blamed for More than 1,600 Accidental 911 Calls Since October
    The new Emergency SOS feature released by Apple for the iPhone is the one to blame for no less than 1,600 false calls to 911 since October, according to dispatchers. And surprisingly, emergency teams in Elk Grove and Sacramento County in California say they receive at least 20 such 911 calls every day from what appears to be an Apple service center. While it’s not exactly clear why the iPhones that are probably brought in for repairs end up dialing 911, dispatchers told CBS that the false calls were first noticed in the fall of the last year. Apple launched new iPhones in September 2017 and they went on sale later the same month and in November, but it’s not clear if these new devices are in any way related to the increasing number of accidental calls to 911.
  • Game Studio Found To Install Malware DRM On Customers' Machines, Defends Itself, Then Apologizes
    The thin line that exists between entertainment industry DRM software and plain malware has been pointed out both recently and in the past. There are many layers to this onion, ranging from Sony's rootkit fiasco, to performance hits on machines thanks to DRM installed by video games, up to and including the insane idea that copyright holders ought to be able to use malware payloads to "hack back" against accused infringers. What is different in more recent times is the public awareness regarding DRM, computer security, and an overall fear of malware. This is a natural kind of progression, as the public becomes more connected and reliant on computer systems and the internet, they likewise become more concerned about those systems. That may likely explain the swift public backlash to a small game-modding studio seemingly installing something akin to malware in every installation of its software, whether from a legitimate purchase or piracy.

Server: Benchmarks, IBM and Red Hat

  • 36-Way Comparison Of Amazon EC2 / Google Compute Engine / Microsoft Azure Cloud Instances vs. Intel/AMD CPUs
    Earlier this week I delivered a number of benchmarks comparing Amazon EC2 instances to bare metal Intel/AMD systems. Due to interest from that, here is a larger selection of cloud instance types from the leading public clouds of Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud, Microsoft Azure, and Google Compute Engine.
  • IBM's Phil Estes on the Turbulent Waters of Container History
    Phil Estes painted a different picture of container history at Open Source 101 in Raleigh last weekend, speaking from the perspective of someone who had a front row seat. To hear him tell it, this rise and success is a story filled with intrigue, and enough drama to keep a daytime soap opera going for a season or two.
  • Red Hat CSA Mike Bursell on 'managed degradation' and open data
    As part of Red Hat's CTO office chief security architect Mike Bursell has to be informed of security threats past, present and yet to come – as many as 10 years into the future. The open source company has access to a wealth of customers in verticals including health, finance, defence, the public sector and more. So how do these insights inform the company's understanding of the future threat landscape?
  • Red Hat Offers New Decision Management Tech Platform
    Red Hat (NYSE: RHT) has released a platform that will work to support information technology applications and streamline the deployment of rules-based tools in efforts to automate processes for business decision management, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

Vulkan Anniversary and Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers

  • Vulkan Turns Two Years Old, What Do You Hope For Next?
    This last week marked two years since the debut of Vulkan 1.0, you can see our our original launch article. My overworked memory missed realizing it by a few days, but it's been a pretty miraculous two years for this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • Generic FBDEV Emulation Continues To Be Worked On For DRM Drivers
    Noralf Trønnes has spent the past few months working on generic FBDEV emulation for Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) drivers and this week he volleyed his third revision of these patches, which now includes a new in-kernel API along with some clients like a bootsplash system, VT console, and fbdev implementation.