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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Jumping ship: PCLinuxOS 2007 vs. Mint 3.0 "Cassandra"

Filed under
Linux

the distrogue: Windows and OS X aren't perfect (or BSD or Haiku or whatever), but there are distributions that would be better suited to a complete Linux newbie than Ubuntu. Arguably two of the best are PCLinuxOS and Mint.

A KDE 4.0 release party around January and the Gamma plan

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: For quite some time know the KDE team thought about having a KDE 4 release party some months after the original KDE 4.0 release. According to that plan the KDE 4.0 release in October will be official, but not press-release-official - that one will be celebrated some months later.

running software in PCLinuxOS 2007

Filed under
PCLOS

Xenh12@PCLinuxOS: where PCLinuxOS has a real edge over a distro like Ubuntu, is when it comes to the programs available in synaptic.

Yet another Ubuntu convert!

Filed under
Ubuntu

dasman’s World: I can only take so many mysterious disappearances of my wireless network. It turns out, exactly 146 disappearances! Smile So, when my Vista laptop decided for the 147th time that I was connected to my wireless network “kind of”, I decided enough was enough!

ISO creation and CD/DVD burning from terminal

Filed under
HowTos

vertito.blogspot: How to create ISO images from terminal?
How to create CD/DVD ISO image of files/folder from terminal?
How to create CD/DVD ISO image of CD/DVD disk from terminal?
How to burn ISO image file into floppy or CD/DVD disk from terminal?
How to burn ISO image file into floppy or CD/DVD disk from Gnome F7?
How to burn DVD .IMG file to DVD disk from terminal?

Plain Text Versions of Sed, ed and AWK Cheat Sheets

Filed under
HowTos

catonmat.net: Ever since I published my personal sed, ed and awk cheat sheets in .pdf and .doc formats, I have been receiving suggestions that I should also create plain text versions of them.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu prepares Gutsy Gibbon

  • Ubuntu's displayconfig-gtk
  • Testing the Ubuntu Mobile Kernel
  • Nine (more) open-source companies to watch
  • Oxygen style shaping up.
  • Shared source: don't throw the babysteps out with the bathwater
  • Open Source licence proliferation could threaten business IT
  • Kenya: Who Needs Free Software in a World of Dwindling Charity?
  • Moving from FreeBSD to Linux - why?
  • Is there a desktop Linux revolution?
  • Why Can’t We Compute in the Cloud?
  • Microsoft and Open Source: Friends or Foes?
  • Model train software spat threatens future of open source
  • Under the hood of the $100 laptop

New Awn Look Preview

Filed under
Software

The Linux Movement: Now a little while ago I posted about a new Awn mock up that looked really great designed by Awn forum user Meek. Well to be exact I posted about it on August 15. Now why is that date important? Thats about when the idea was first posted on the Awn forum. This is now 9 days later, and we have a working preview of this mock-up already! Now that is progress!

This Just In: China Votes "No with Comments" on OOXML

Filed under
OSS

consortiuminfo.org: This just in: China has unanimously voted "no, with comments" on OOXML. As I had noted in an earlier blog entry, China had been signalling some displeasure with Microsoft and OOXML in recent weeks, via Xinhua, the official government news agency, so this is not totally a surprise.

Multimedia Linux computer fits in USB key

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices: A start-up in the French Alps near Grenoble is readying its second Linux SBC (single-board computer) the size and shape of a USB memory stick. Calao's USB-S8815 is based on a 333MHz ARM9 processor, runs Linux 2.6, and has 128MB each of flash and RAM.

Kazehakase on steroids

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress.com: All right, if you’re still using Firefox, you need to put down the mouse right now. Just put it down. Let go. Relax your index finger for a few minutes. Most of the about:config tweaks that work for Firefox also work for Kazehakase.

Nano-review of Ubuntu 7.10 alpha 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

blogbeebe: Downloaded, burned, and booted into Ubuntu 7.10 alpha 5 just to kick the virtual tires. Impressed over all with the quality of this alpha release, and I can see (and appreciate) where Canonical is going with Ubuntu.

Also: Ubuntu 7.10 “Gutsy” Tribe 5 : A Review

OSX-Like Widgets with Ubuntu, Screenlets, and Compiz Fusion

Filed under
HowTos

tom-buntu: Screenlets are themed mini-applications programmed in Python. They are comparable to the widgets in OSX and Windows. This post will guide you through installing Screenlets and setting them up with Compiz Fusion to work similarly to widgets in Apple’s OSX.

Perfectly Cromulent Image Cropping with the GIMP

Filed under
HowTos

Moving to Freedom: I’m guessing that most people with a digital camera or a web site have spent time cropping pictures. There are lots of programs that can do this. In this post I hope to show you that the GIMP is a great tool for cropping pictures.

ET: Quake Wars Enters Beta For Linux

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix: This week the Linux client for Enemy Territory: Quake Wars has entered beta. Unlike the Windows client, the Linux client is not available as a public beta.

Why Home Users Absolutely Shouldn't Use Linux

Filed under
Linux

covarr.blogspot: All over the place, I'm seeing websites and blogs claiming that everybody needs to switch to Linux. Some say Ubuntu, some say Debian, and some say Slackware, but they all seem to agree on Linux in general. I have created a list of five reasons why they are wrong.

A Quick introduction To FVWM - Virtual Desktop Windows Manager for Linux

Filed under
Software

credence: FVWM image pictureFVWM is one of the big mysteries of the open source world. It is an extremely versatile window manager, configurable up to every possible aspect. However, many beginners are somewhat scared because they do not know exactly how to go about learning to use FVWM. This is what we will talk about here.

PackageKit progress

Filed under
Software
MDV

Fabrice Facorat: Previously I talked about PackageKit, a DBUS system to handle packages, especially for the updates mecanism. So what's new on PackageKit front ?

Also: Expérimental X11 intel driver

Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "The elections for five of the ten members of the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board[TAB] are held every year, currently the election will be at the 2007 Kernel Summit in a BOF session," James Bottomley, the TAB chair, announced on the Linux Kernel mailing list.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India