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Saturday, 23 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Debian Release Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 6:56am
Story Open-source IoT kit runs OpenWRT, mimics Arduino Yun Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 12:25am
Story Debian 7 Wheezy and Debian 8 Jessie Might Become LTS Releases Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 9:26pm
Story World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 7:12pm
Story BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 7:07pm
Story Mixing the Ingredients Together – Announcing OpenMandriva Lx 3 Alpha Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 7:00pm
Story Scientists Use Ubuntu to Interpret Hubble Telescope Data Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 6:56pm
Story GNOME 3.17/3.18 Schedule available Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 6:24pm
Story Enterprises still miss the real point of open source Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 5:15pm
Story Hidden Options in Ubuntu 15.04 Can Make It Much Better Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 4:57pm

Canonical Announces Availability of Ubuntu 9.04

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Canonical Announces Availability of Ubuntu 9.04 Desktop Edition

  • Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope slices boot time in half
  • Ubuntu Server Edition 9.04: Progress with HP
  • New Ubuntu 9.04 installed - not many dead
  • Ubuntu: Dell and Zealots
  • Ubuntu 9.04 Arrives, But Where Are the Channel Partners?
  • Upgrading from Intrepid to Jaunty
  • First look: Ubuntu 9.04 RC

Oracle buys MySQL shocker

Filed under
OSS
  • Oracle buys MySQL shocker (and they get the rest of Sun too)

  • The five biggest changes out of Sun/Oracle
  • OpenSolaris, Linux Could Merge Under Oracle
  • Oracle-Sun: an enterprise catastrophe
  • Oracle's Sun Purchase Raises New Questions
  • What the Oracle Acquisition of Sun Means for Linux
  • Shuttleworth: Oracle now largest open source player
  • What does Oracle mean for Sun's open source efforts?
  • What Sun can do now - and why you should help.
  • Oracle Buys Sun. Linux Gets a Boost.
  • What Might Oracle Do With OpenOffice?
  • Shuttleworth: Oracle's Sun buy validates open source
  • Oracle buys Sun, but does it buy open source?
  • Oracle buys Sun: understanding the impact on open source
  • MySQL conference kicks off; too early for Oracle buzz

Has Microsoft lost its war on open source?

Filed under
Microsoft

infoworld.com: Is Microsoft a friend or foe of open source? Going by the company's actions, Microsoft can't seem to decide whether to make love or war. But if it's war, Microsoft appears to lack the legal weaponry to defeat or even disturb its adversaries.

Home Education and Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: Home education is all the rage and for good reasons. How can Open Source Software help?

Ubuntu inside Windows: the Good, Bad and the Ugly

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: Recently there has been tremendous buzz surrounding a method of running a full Ubuntu Linux installation within Windows. Unlike similar alternatives for Windows, however, the user is not installing Linux only to have to reboot out of Windows to enjoy their new Linux install.

PC-BSD 7.1 vs. Kubuntu 9.04 Benchmarks

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: Earlier this month PC-BSD 7.1 was released. With the Phoronix Test Suite now having enhanced support for PC-BSD, we decided to see how well PC-BSD 7.1 performs against Kubuntu 9.04.

Oracle buys Sun - what now for MySQL, Java and OOo?

Filed under
Software

tuxradar.com: Oracle has announced it is purchasing Sun Microsystems for just over $7 billion. The official word from Oracle is that the purchase gives it two key assets - Java and Solaris - but open sourcerers will understandably be more interested in MySQL and OpenOffice.org.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 299

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Opinion: FOSS needs a central bug tracker

  • Tips and tricks: Reverting to older kernel under Ubuntu
  • News: Ubuntu takes pre-orders for Jaunty, Mandriva supports Smolt, Easy Peasy focuses on interface improvements, interview with Fedora developer
  • Released last week: Sabayon Linux 4.1 "GNOME", SliTaz GNU/Linux 2.0
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Studio and Mythbuntu 9.04
  • New additions: Satux
  • New distributions: Desktop Paraná, Lihuen
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

PC-BSD 7.1 Operating System Review

Filed under
BSD

extremetech.com: PC-BSD is another option for those who want an alternative to Windows but who might not be interested in Linux or Mac OS X. PC-BSD is an operating system that is based on FreeBSD and uses the KDE desktop.

Review: Backups with Back in Time

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Backing up generally isn’t a fun activity, but always proves to be worth it when that disaster you are not expecting happens.

Evolution Gripes

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: I’ve used Evolution, the default email client in Ubuntu, for a couple of years to manage numerous mail accounts. In general, I think it’s a great application. But as with everything in life, there’s always room for improvement.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How To search for an string in a file using grep

  • User Guides for Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope
  • Ultimate Resources for Ubuntu
  • The Current State of Linux Distros
  • A quick guide to backups using tar
  • Working with VESA 1.2
  • The GNOME Help Browser
  • How to Quickly View Calendar in Terminal
  • How to add rc.local support to Debian
  • I am now an official Linux Fan
  • glibc 2.10 news
  • Cross-Platform Open Source Video Game: Nexuiz
  • Upgrade Ubuntu with a CD Image
  • Computing Energy Usage…
  • Fix Your Crap 1: Want Tracker Support in Nautilus?
  • Too Many Choices?

Six Linux softphone's list

Filed under
Software

go2linux.org: VoIP has improved a lot since its first days, today a lot of multinational business are using it as a reliable way to keep stay in touch.

SliTaz 2.0: Screenshot Tour

Filed under
Linux

linuxinfusion.com: If you are looking for something small to run on an older computer, SliTaz is definitely a worthy contender to look into. Do not let the small size of the ISO fool you. It contains more than enough software to get you going.

To Ubuntu bashers: Stop sulking and get a life

Filed under
Ubuntu

manishtech.wordpress: Looks as if Ubuntu bashing has become a fashion lately. After getting fed up with MS, Apple and Adobe now its chance for Ubuntu to face the wrath of the trolls.

No Minix code in Linux Ever -- More Evidence

Filed under
Linux

groklaw.net: I saw an article the other day, repeating the mistaken view that there was Minix code in an early version of Linux. I knew that was not true, because for one thing Linus told us it was not true years ago. And Andrew Tanenbaum confirmed.

How slow can Linux go?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld.com: If it has a CPU, you can run Linux on it. Xboxes or iPhones, cars or calculators, Linux can live quite happily on any of these devices. But, when it comes to the desktop or laptop, how much processing power do you need to run a modern Linux desktop?

A Review of Popular Window Navigators for Linux

Filed under
Software

thelinuxcauldron.wordpress: After a long time, I said to myself, can I lose that bottom panel? I really wanted something semi-flashy that had function, giving me access to my favorite shortcuts.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #138

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #138 for the week of April 12th- April 18th, 2009 is now available.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat Woes and Fedora 29 Plans

  • Shares of open-source giant Red Hat pounded on weaker outlook
  • Fedora 29 Aims To Offer Up Modules For Everyone
    The latest Fedora 29 feature proposal is about offering "modules for everyone" across all Fedora editions. The "modules for everyone" proposal would make it where all Fedora installations have modular repositories enabled by default. Up to now the modular functionality was just enabled by default in Fedora Server 28. The modular functionality allows Fedora users to choose alternate versions of popular software, such as different versions of Node.js and other server software components where you might want to stick to a particular version.

GNU Make, FSFE Newsletter, and FSF's BLAG Removal

  • Linux Fu: The Great Power of Make
    Over the years, Linux (well, the operating system that is commonly known as Linux which is the Linux kernel and the GNU tools) has become much more complicated than its Unix roots. That’s inevitable, of course. However, it means old-timers get to slowly grow into new features while new people have to learn all in one gulp. A good example of this is how software is typically built on a Linux system. Fundamentally, most projects use make — a program that tries to be smart about running compiles. This was especially important when your 100 MHz CPU connected to a very slow disk drive would take a day to build a significant piece of software. On the face of it, make is pretty simple. But today, looking at a typical makefile will give you a headache, and many projects use an abstraction over make that further obscures things.
  • FSFE Newsletter June 2018
  • About BLAG's removal from our list of endorsed distributions
    We recently updated our list of free GNU/Linux distributions to add a "Historical" section. BLAG Linux and GNU, based on Fedora, joined the list many years ago. But the maintainers no longer believe they can keep things running at this time. As such, they requested that they be removed from our list. The list helps users to find operating systems that come with only free software and documentation, and that do not promote any nonfree software. Being added to the list means that a distribution has gone through a rigorous screening process, and is dedicated to diligently fixing any freedom issues that may arise.

Servers: Kubernetes, Oracle's Cloudwashing and Embrace of ARM

  • Bloomberg Eschews Vendors For Direct Kubernetes Involvement
    Rather than use a managed Kubernetes service or employ an outsourced provider, Bloomberg has chosen to invest in deep Kubernetes expertise and keep the skills in-house. Like many enterprise organizations, Bloomberg originally went looking for an off-the-shelf approach before settling on the decision to get involved more deeply with the open source project directly. "We started looking at Kubernetes a little over two years ago," said Steven Bower, Data and Infrastructure Lead at Bloomberg. ... "It's a great execution environment for data science," says Bower. "The real Aha! moment for us was when we realized that not only does it have all these great base primitives like pods and replica sets, but you can also define your own primitives and custom controllers that use them."
  • Oracle is changing how it reports cloud revenues, what's it hiding? [iophk: "probably Microsoft doing this too" (cloudwashing)]
     

    In short: Oracle no longer reports specific revenue for cloud PaaS, IaaS and SaaS, instead bundling them all into one reporting line which it calls 'cloud services and licence support'. This line pulled in 60% of total revenue for the quarter at $6.8 billion, up 8% year-on-year, for what it's worth.

  • Announcing the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for ARM
    Oracle is pleased to announce the general availability of Oracle Linux 7 for the ARM architecture.
  • Oracle Linux 7 Now Ready For ARM Servers
    While Red Hat officially launched RHEL7 for ARM servers last November, on Friday Oracle finally announced the general availability of their RHEL7-derived Oracle Linux 7 for ARM. Oracle Linux 7 Update 5 is available for ARM 64-bit (ARMv8 / AArch64), including with their new Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 5 based on Linux 4.14.

Graphics: XWayland, Ozone-GBM, Freedreno, X.Org, RadeonSI

  • The Latest Batch Of XWayland / EGLStream Improvements Merged
    While the initial EGLStreams-based support for using the NVIDIA proprietary driver with XWayland was merged for the recent X.Org Server 1.20 release, the next xorg-server release will feature more improvements.
  • Making Use Of Chrome's Ozone-GBM Intel Graphics Support On The Linux Desktop
    Intel open-source developer Joone Hur has provided a guide about using the Chrome OS graphics stack on Intel-based Linux desktop systems. In particular, using the Chrome OS graphics stack on the Linux desktop is primarily about using the Ozone-GBM back-end to Ozone that allows for direct interaction with Intel DRM/KMS support and evdev for input.
  • Freedreno Reaches OpenGL ES 3.1 Support, Not Far From OpenGL 3.3
    The Freedreno Gallium3D driver now supports all extensions required by OpenGL ES 3.1 and is also quite close to supporting desktop OpenGL 3.3.
  • X.Org Is Looking For A North American Host For XDC2019
    If software development isn't your forte but are looking to help out a leading open-source project while logistics and hospitality are where you excel, the X.Org Foundation is soliciting bids for the XDC2019 conference. The X.Org Foundation is looking for proposals where in North America that the annual X.Org Developers' Conference should be hosted in 2019. This year it's being hosted in Spain and with the usual rotation it means that in 2019 they will jump back over the pond.
  • RadeonSI Compatibility Profile Is Close To OpenGL 4.4 Support
    It was just a few days ago that the OpenGL compatibility profile support in Mesa reached OpenGL 3.3 compliance for RadeonSI while now thanks to the latest batch of patches from one of the Valve Linux developers, it's soon going to hit OpenGL 4.4. Legendary open-source graphics driver contributor Timothy Arceri at Valve has posted 11 more patches for advancing RadeonSI's OpenGL compatibility profile support, the alternative context to the OpenGL core profile that allows mixing in deprecated OpenGL functionality. The GL compatibility profile mode is generally used by long-standing workstation software and also a small subset of Linux games.