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Thursday, 21 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ONLYOFFICE Document Server 3.0 Release and Other News for Open Source Community Roy Schestowitz 23/04/2015 - 7:07am
Story Cortex-A9 Sitara EVM gains Android KitKat BSP Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:50pm
Story GIMP's Porting To GTK3 Continues Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:42pm
Story Eight Ways to Use Open Source for More Effective Data Protection Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:39pm
Story The NHS must embrace open source to improve Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:32pm
Story Is OpenOffice Dying? Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:28pm
Story "No Reboot" Kernel Patching - And Why You Should Care Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:22pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:02pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 11:01pm
Story Sourcegraph: A free code search tool for open source developers Rianne Schestowitz 22/04/2015 - 10:51pm

Do operating systems still matter?

Filed under
OS

ianmurdock.com: Do operating systems (still) matter? If you’re writing an application at the level of Java or PHP, what difference does it make what operating system is running underneath?

Dumping Windows for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

livewithoutwork.com: I have decided after much deliberation that I am no longer going to withstand Microsoft Window’s buggy software.

Linux: Drivers Should NOT be Closed Source

Filed under
Linux

doctormo.wordpress: In one of my previous blog entries about a Dell Support issue some of the comments suggested that the reason we were in this mess was because of the inflexible nature of the Linux kernel.

Changes to the GNOME System Administration Team

Filed under
Software

lwn.net (gnome-announce-list): We'd like to announce a formal system administration team. GNOME has long had an informal sysadmin team that has managed the gnome.org services.

Ubuntu Netbook Remix woes

Filed under
Ubuntu

Envizions Announces 3-D Online Community for Linux Game Console

Filed under
Web

ostatic.com/blog: When I read the press release about EVO's community, called "My Universe," I shuddered violently enough to shake the couch and scare the small dog sitting beside me. I realize that maybe, in the EVO's case, this might not be a fair assumption.

Ubuntu 9.04: Faster, but more of the same.

Filed under
Ubuntu

techiemoe.com: The latest entry, 9.04 "Jaunty Jackalope," promises to be another iterative release, with a couple of new features (faster boot, overhaulted notifications system) but nothing to blow your skirt up.

Washington state rejects open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: National, state and local governments are all waking up to the opportunity open source offers. Washington state, the home of Microsoft, appears to be an exception.

Also: How open source got its wings

Android destined for a set-top box?

linuxdevices.com: Motorola and KDDI are developing a new version of their Linux-based Au Box set-top box (STB) that runs the Android stack.

Where do I find Linux software?

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: But what if you are searching for Linux software? Where do you go? Is there a one stop shop for all of your software needs? Yes and no. Even though that answer is not a resounding YES! there is a plus side.

Mark Shuttleworth: Meta-cycles: 2-3 year major cycles for free software?

Filed under
Ubuntu

markshuttleworth.com: Six-month cycles are great. Now let’s talk about meta-cycles: broader release cycles for major work. I’m very interested in a cross-community conversation about this.

Dconf in GNOME 3.0 : one step further to Windows registry ?

Filed under
Software

linux-wizard.net: Today, while reading LWN.net Weekly Edition for April 9 concerning GNOME 3.0, I noticed the part about dconf. Dconf aims to replace ... gconf already. Yeah, we can't keep a simple technology as simple as reading and writing application configurations settings more than 8 years ...

Switching To KDE From Gnome

Filed under
KDE

customdistros.com: This morning I thought I would shake things up a little and start using KDE instead of Gnome. Installation of KDE is simple enough, but actually using it turned out to be a little different for a KDE newbie such as myself.

10 things you should look for in a netbook

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.techrepublic.com: When you’re evaluating netbooks, you have to weigh the convenience of their small form factor against a variety of limitations. Erik Eckel explains several key considerations that will help you find a suitable middle ground.

Nexuiz 2.5

Filed under
Gaming

freegamer.blogspot: So what are the big selling points of 2.5 from the player side of view? According to the changelog: New HUD, new weapons, new racing game mode, improved look & sound, better bots.

Do you need to worry about the new /dev/mem rootkit problem?

Filed under
Security

blog.ibeentoubuntu.com: A new paper was presented in late March about using /dev/mem to inject and hide a rootkit (PDF), and the method has been getting some press, leading to a little concern.

Lancelot and Raptor menu - the other way

Filed under
KDE
Software

polishlinux.org: Lancelot and Raptor are alternative menus intended for KDE 4. We are, however, at the frosty point, and we should ask ourselves the most important question here - which one to choose.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.30

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: The next major Linux version will include new Wi-Fi drivers for chips from Atheros, Intel, Intersil/Prism and Marvell and new drivers for Intel LAN chips. The kernel will also in future make better use of energy saving features.

Linux Desktop in Peril

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: As I've written before, the Linux desktop in danger of extinction. If operating systems could be placed on the Endangered Species list, I'd lobby for it.

Health Check: openSUSE - Then and now

Filed under
SUSE

h-online.com: openSUSE 11.1, the latest community edition of Novell SUSE Linux, was released just in time for Christmas, to largely favourable reviews. openSUSE remains one of the market leaders, and features the latest and greatest stable releases of most of the important packages that make a classic GNU/Linux distribution, but it has had its troubles during recent years.

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More in Tux Machines

Funding for Open 'Core' Companies

'Proper' GNU/Linux on Google OSes

  • Google’s Fuchsia OS will support Linux apps
    Google’s non-Linux-based Fuchsia OS has added an emulator for running Debian Linux apps. Like its upcoming Linux emulator for Chrome OS, Fuchsia’s “Guest” app will offer tighter integration than typical emulators. Google has added a Guest app to its emergent and currently open source Fuchsia OS to enable Linux apps to run within Fuchsia as a virtual machine (VM). The Guest app makes use of a library called Machina that permits closer integration with the OS than is available with typical emulators, according to a recent 9to5Google story.
  • Here are the latest Chrome OS devices that will support Linux apps
    The ability to run Linux apps in virtual machines in Chrome is expanding beyond Google's flagship Pixelbook line of Chromebooks. The feature, for which plans were first discovered in late February, was formally announced by Google at I/O 2018. Unlike the existing solution, Crouton, support for Linux apps does not require enabling developer mode on Chrome OS, allowing users to install Linux apps without needing to sacrifice security protections. In addition to the Pixelbook, support for the new Crostini virtual machine feature has also come to the original Samsung Chromebook Plus, the detachable HP Chromebook X2, and the ASUS Chromebook Flip C101. Likewise, according to a report from xda-developers, the feature is coming to the Acer Chromebook Spin 13 and Chromebook 13, as well as 2018-era Chromeboxes, which all share the same board ID "fizz." Of these, the Acer Chromebox CX13 series and ASUS Chromebox 3 series both have multiple SKUs, maxing out with an Intel Core i7-8550U paired with 16GB RAM and 64GB storage for $750.
  • Linux App Support Is Coming To Acer Chromebook Flip C101
    Acer’s Chromebook Flip C101 is now officially the latest Chrome OS device expected to be in-line for virtualized Linux app support, following a new commit pushed to the Chromium Gerrit on June 15. That places the Flip C101 in a very select club alongside Google’s Pixelbook, the HP Chromebook x2, and the first generation Samsung Chromebook Plus. Of course, there’s no official date with regard to when Linux App support will arrive for the Chromebook Flip C101. If previous trends are followed, then it shouldn’t take too long at all for its official arrival in the Canary Channel of the OS. That comes following a commit indicating that support for the new feature has been moved from the Samsung Chromebook Plus to the devices’ shared parent board. Since only the Chromebook Plus and Chromebook Flip C101 share that board, dubbed “Gru,” that suggests that both devices will support Linux apps in a virtual environment.

Linux Foundation: New Study, Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), and Hyperledger Fabric

Graphics: AMDGPU, Nvidia, Apple's Harm to Science

  • AMDGPU DRM Driver To Finally Expose GPU Load Via Sysfs
    The AMDGPU DRM driver appears to finally be crossing the milestone of exposing the current GPU load (as a percentage) in a manner that can be easily queried via sysfs. For years I've been frustrated via the lack of standardization of sysfs/debugfs files among the DRM drivers and some seemingly basic information not being exposed in such a manner that easily benefits various desktop plug-ins, those wanting to script basic monitors/checks/etc around such outputs, and use-cases like with the Phoronix Test Suite for easily querying this information too for its sensor recording. One of the frustrations with the Radeon Linux stack has been that there wasn't a trivial way to read the GPU load usage as a percentage... There's been ways if installing third-party utilities like RadeonTool, but no universal solution nor one that doesn't require root and would be widely available.
  • Radeon Software 18.20 Stable Released With Official Ubuntu 18.04 LTS Support
    The Radeon Software "AMDGPU-PRO" 18.20 hybrid driver stack is now available with official support for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 17.20. Two months after the debut of the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS "Bionic Beaver" release, the Q2'2018 Radeon Sotware for Linux driver update has arrived with support for this latest long-term support release. Radeon Software 18.20 was officially released last week but seemingly went under everyone's radar until now.
  • Nvidia Releases a Batch of Open Source Tools for AI
    Graphics processors increasingly used as hardware accelerators for deep learning applications are also being deployed with the Kubernetes cluster orchestrator as another way to accelerate the scaling of training and inference for deep learning models. The two-front approach includes Nvidia’s (NASDAQ: NVDA) release to developers this week of a Kubernetes on GPU capability aimed at enterprises training models on multi-cloud GPU clusters. Previously, Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) launched a beta version of GPUs on its Kubernetes Engine aimed at accelerating machine learning and image processing workloads.
  • AI caramba! Nvidia devs get a host of new kit to build smart systems
    Nvidia has released a bunch of new tools for savvy AI developers in time for the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference in Salt Lake City on Tuesday.
  • Chemists criticise mooted shutdown of 3D visualisation tools
    End of support for Apple’s OpenGL programming interface could pull the plug on molecular modelling software Researchers are voicing concerns over a move that may affect many 3D visualisation programs that are commonly used in computational research. Apple’s Macintosh operating systems (macOS) is set to end support for OpenGL, the programming interface frequently used to display 3D graphics in medical and scientific visualisation software, which has existed since 1992. Nearly all open source and commercial chemistry visualisation programs that are used to display atoms, molecules, bonds and protein ribbons – such as Mercury, VMD and PyMOL – use the system.