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Friday, 20 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Steam for Linux Now Has More Than 600 Games Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 12:26pm
Story Weekend in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 12:13pm
Story PCLinuxOS Magazine August 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 8:14am
Story Ubuntu Touch Image #157 Comes With Mir And Unity 8 Improvements, Among Others Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:11am
Story The Best Lightweight Graphical Email Clients Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 7:08am
Story Let's Use Linux and Android SDK for Better Android App Development Roy Schestowitz 03/08/2014 - 6:59am
Story Randa Meetings Interview Four: Myriam Schweingruber Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 10:17pm
Story Nouveau vs. NVIDIA Power Monitoring Results Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 10:08pm
Story Linux Advocates in the Wild Rianne Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:50pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 02/08/2014 - 9:32pm

Battle of the Titans - Mandriva vs openSUSE: The Rematch

Filed under
MDV
SUSE
-s

Last fall when the two mega-distros openSUSE and Mandriva both hit the mirrors, it was difficult to decide which I liked better. In an attempt to narrow it down, I ran some light-hearted tests and found Mandriva won out in a side-by-side comparison. But things change rapidly in the Linux world and I wondered how a competition of the newest releases would come out. Mandriva 2008.1 was released this past April and openSUSE 11.0 was released just last week.

24 hours with openSUSE 11.0

Filed under
SUSE

bear454.blogspot: 24 hours. Not 'a day'; not figuratively; I've spent 24 hours with the recently released update to my long-running favorite OS. OpenSUSE Linux 11.0 is revolutionary, but my enthusiasm is tempered by substantial regressions.

Also: OpenSUSE 11.0 on a Lenovo ThinkPad T61

few early howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Firefox 3 Tips & Tricks

  • Quick documents from the desktop
  • How to personalize a package’s CFLAGS in Gentoo
  • Resolve Windows (Netbios) Hostname in Ubuntu
  • Simple Perl Script To Ease Console Server Use On Linux And Unix
  • How to install Mplayer codecs in openSUSE 11-x86_64

Kernel space: drivers that don't make the kernel scene

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: Linux supports most hardware "out of the box" without adding a driver. Most of the missing drivers are proprietary, from uncooperative manufacturers, but there are a few where the license is right but the actual code is still missing. Why?

Another Programming Language for Kids, but This One Is Impressive

Filed under
Software

codingexperiments.com: I just spent today spending my time with an interesting little app, Scratch. It’s a cool little application that introduces children and early teens to programming and animation.

My Newfound Love for Xfce!

Filed under
Software

ericsbinaryworld.com/blogs: For the past week to two weeks I’ve done something I had’t done in years - I switched my default desktop environment in my GDM login screen. I’ve been logging into Xfce instead of my usual Gnome. There are basically three reasons why I’m loving Xfce over Gnome.

Interview with Jean-Philippe Guillemin, Zenwalk’s creator

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

oneopensource.it: Zenwalk is one of the most promising Linux distribution. Based on Slackware, the distro is lightweight, simple and stable. We decided to make some questions to Jean-Philippe Guillemin, Zenwalk’s creator, regarding future plans and developments about this “GNU-Linux Operating System”.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Lessons of the Linux revolution

  • VirtualBox B0rken By Gutsy Kernel Upgrade
  • OpenLX and KalCulate pair Linux distro with proprietary accounting app
  • Report: Open Source City in Liverpool
  • Jim Zemlin: Nokia Launches a Full Scale War for the Mobile OS
  • Kiss VMWare's rump good-bye
  • Linux vs. Closed-Source Kernel Modules
  • Firefox: checking for updates?
  • Mozilla Developer News June 24
  • Vi Assistant
  • Open source tour of Europe: The Netherlands
  • Mandriva: Compatibility & Drivers I
  • Europcar buys into Red Hat's allegedly nonexistent desktop
  • Open Source vs. Profit: Google Android (iPhone 3G), Linux (Microsoft Vista)
  • A low-cost education-use mobile computer 'LUKID'
  • Gdium, another Eee PC competitor
  • LOLspeak creeping into code

openSUSE 11.0 x86_64 Review

Filed under
SUSE

dtschmitz.com: I have finished setting up openSUSE 11.0 on my HP dv2000z AMD Turion64 X2. Up to version 10.3 I was running the 32-bit version of SUSE and decided now was a good time to do a 'New' install and give x86_64 a spin.

I Did It - Ubuntu Linux on my Laptop

Filed under
Ubuntu

browncoatcat.wordpress: The great thing about Linux, all the distributions, not just Ubuntu is that people share what they have learnt, and it is always possible to find help with a problem. So in this spirit of sharing, here is how I got my new laptop to work with Ubuntu Linux.

Acer Aspire One

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

cnet.com.au: The Acer Aspire One is better than most netbooks. It's fantastic for anyone who wants a small, cheap machine on which to type and surf the Web. However, its battery life lets it down slightly.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Chroot users with OpenSSH: An easier way to confine users to their home directories

  • Booting of a Live CD without a CD or an Emulator
  • Adding XFS Support to RHEL5
  • How to scan and OCR like a pro with open source tools
  • Linux And Unix System Security Wrap-Up - Part 4b
  • Vi Search and Replace
  • Ubuntu Hardy: How To Disable Synaptics Touchpad When Typing
  • Monitoring network performance with speedometer
  • Development with Pluggable Authentication Modules (PAM)
  • Quickzi: How To Add a Line into the middle of a Text File
  • Making Music (Beats) on Linux/Ubuntu with Hydrogen

Arch Linux 2008.06

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: It’s taken some time, but here it is, the spankin new, fresh from the press Arch release, ambitiously called “Overlord”. In this review, I’ll have a look at it, and discuss a bit of the Arch philosophy in general.

Coders now can try mobile Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
Ubuntu

cnet.com: Canonical on Tuesday released its first publicly available developer edition of Ubuntu for mobile Internet devices. Ubuntu MID works on two devices at present, the Samsung Q1U and the Intel Crown Beach.

ASUS Eee PC 901 Linux Edition Review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

slashgear.com: If the ASUS Eee 900 basically amounted to a larger-screened version of the 7-inch original, then the Eee 901 marks its graduation into a distinct model. Thankfully they’ve subjected the 901 to a mild degree of fettling, tweaking case and controls and making for a markedly more attractive proposition.

openSUSE 11.0 Numbers?

Filed under
SUSE
  • Numbers?

  • First on openSUSE 11.0 Based KDE Four Live Release
  • Interview with Christer Edwards, Ubuntu Utah Founder
  • Staying with openSUSE - Switching to GNOME
  • Ubuntu faster than openSUSE?

What does it mean to be an Open Source author? A story from the inside

Filed under
OSS

jroller.com: I hear daily about open source projects, the open source business model, what it means in terms of freedom, choice, risks, investment, etc... What I rarely hear about is what is life like for those who actually contribute and dedicate a part of their life to open source?

Sorry Simon, but you’re still screwing up

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: In an interview with Builder AU Sun’s chief open source officer, Simon Phipps, admits that Sun “screwed up” regarding open source. But he isolates the “screw-up” to 2001-2002, when Sun was still a proprietary company. This is like a candidate for re-election blaming the problems he faces on a predecessor from the other party.

coLinux gets its second wind

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Cooperative Linux (coLinux for short) occupies a unique niche in the field of virtualization -- that of running GNU/Linux natively in Windows. Now, with the current interest in attracting Windows users to GNU/Linux, as evidenced by such tools as Ubuntu's Wubi and Fedora's Live USB-Creator, the technology behind coLinux seems overdue for a closer look.

Open Up To The World Of Opportunities With Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

seofreelisting.com: Linux is a widely used operating system, which has recently launched ubuntu, a program allows the users to customize desktops and perform several functions easily.

Also: Ubuntu "Hardy Heron" -- Observations After Upgrading

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Mastodon 2.0

About 6 months have passed since April, during which the major mainstream breakthrough of our decentralized social network took place. From 20,000 users to almost a million! What better time to run through a couple examples of what’s been introduced since then? Mastodon is defined by its focus on good user experience, polished design and superior anti-abuse tools. In that vein, the web app has received numerous updates. Using the latest browser features, the web app receives real push notifications, making it almost indistinguishable from a native mobile app. It works faster and looks smoother thanks to many performance and design improvements. Read more

Red Hat: Satellite, OpenShift, Government, SoftBank

  • A Red Hat Satellite tutorial to install an update server
    Is server patch management the best part of your job? Stop reading here. Many IT organizations struggle with OS patching processes. For Red Hat administrators who are willing to invest some initial energy to simplify later tasks, Satellite provides infrastructure lifecycle management, including capabilities for provisioning, reporting and configuration management. To this end, follow this Red Hat Satellite tutorial to set up a simple server for updates. Once we review how to install the basic update server, we'll create one example client.
  • Red Hat updates Gluster storage for OpenShift container apps
    Red Hat bolstered Gluster storage for its OpenShift Container Platform, adding iSCSI block and S3 object interfaces, as well as greater persistent volume density.
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  • Red Hat’s Container Technologies and Knowledge Were Chosen by SoftBank to Embrace DevOps
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that several of Red Hat’s open source technologies, including Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform, as well as the knowledge of Red Hat Consulting, were chosen by SoftBank Corp (“SoftBank”), a subsidiary of SoftBank Group Corp., to implement DevOps methodology for its Service Platform Division, IT Service Development Division, Information Technology Unit, and Technology Unit, the company’s in-house IT organization. This large, varied organization develops, maintains and operates SoftBank’s IT systems for internal work and operations, supporting 600 diverse systems.
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Security: Google Play, WPA2, FERC, HackerOne

  • 8 'Minecraft' apps infected with Sockbot malware on Google Play found adding devices to botnet

    Security researchers have discovered that at least eight malware-laced apps on Google Play Store are ensnaring devices to a botnet to potentially carry out distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) and other malicious attacks. These apps claimed to provide skins to tweak the look of characters in the popular Minecraft: Pocket Edition game and have been downloaded as many as 2.6 million times.

  • KRACK Vulnerability: What You Need To Know
    This week security researchers announced a newly discovered vulnerability dubbed KRACK, which affects several common security protocols for Wi-Fi, including WPA (Wireless Protected Access) and WPA2. This is a bad vulnerability in that it likely affects billions of devices, many of which are hard to patch and will remain vulnerable for a long time. Yet in light of the sometimes overblown media coverage, it’s important to keep the impact of KRACK in perspective: KRACK does not affect HTTPS traffic, and KRACK’s discovery does not mean all Wi-Fi networks are under attack. For most people, the sanest thing to do is simply continue using wireless Internet access.
  • FERC sets rules to protect grid from malware spread through laptops
    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Thursday proposed new mandatory cybersecurity controls to protect the utility system from the threat posed by laptops and other mobile devices that could spread malicious software. The standards are meant to "further enhance the reliability and resilience of the nation's bulk electric system" by preventing malware from infecting utility networks and bringing down the power grid, according to the nation's grid regulator.
  • Hack These Apps And Earn $1,000 — Bug Bounty Program Launched By Google And HackerOne
  • Security Vulnerability Puts Linux Kernel at Risk

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