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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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A quick install of the Opera browser on Feisty, the next version of Ubuntu.

Filed under
HowTos

A test install of Opera 9.10 to see if all is well on the Opera/Ubuntu Feisty compatibility front. In this story flashplugin-nonfree, sun-java6-plugin and sun-java6-jre are installed, all available in the repositories of Ubuntu Feisty (universe multiverse).

sudo apt-get install flashplugin-nonfree, sun-java6-plugin sun-java6-jre

Review: dyne:bolic 2.4.2

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

This distribution is about more than creating another version of Linux. It has a strong political and philosophical impetus behind it. I will let their website explain it:

dyne:bolic is RASTA software released free under the GNU General Public License.

Ubuntu 5.10 reaches end-of-life

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu announced the release of 5.10 almost 18 months ago, on October 13th. As with the earlier releases, Ubuntu committed to ongoing security and critical fixes for a period of 18 months. The support period is now nearing its end and Ubuntu 5.10 will reach end of life on Friday April 13th 2007.

The Feeds and Speeds of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

Filed under
Linux

While Red Hat, like many other operating system and more complete software stack providers, wants to pitch the latest release of its software as a major change in packaging that will broaden the appeal of its products, the fact remains that for many customers, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 is a new and substantially improved operating system that will be sold on its own merits of features, performanc

Beryl 0.2.0 Released

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Software

Beryl 0.2.0 is a complete overhaul of Beryl. The last stable release 0.1, featured a very fun, and eye-candy based compositing window manager. However, since it’s release, many parts of beryl have been rewritten, replaced, or simply dropped. The Beryl team has put in numerous hours to bring you this release.

Fun with Ubuntu -- Top Ten Next Names, Part 2

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Ubuntu

Last week I gave you half of my Top Ten Names for Ubuntu releases. As a reminder, they were: 'pissy porcupine', 'bitty bat', 'virtual viper', 'talky tortoise', and (my favorite) 'kinky kangaroo'. Now here are the rest.

Giving Back

Filed under
OSS

In my last article I cited the Vector Linux developers as an excellent example of the way Open Source developers respond to the user community. All of us who benefit from Linux and/or the myriad of Open Source applications out there are part of that community.

Peeking in the Windows of ReactOS 0.3.1

Filed under
OS
Reviews
-s

With the internetnews.com article published today, I found myself a bit curious as to what ReactOS exactly was and what it looked like.

CrossOver Linux 6.01 review

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Software
Reviews

Though each CrossOver Linux (formerly known as CrossOver Office) release offers substantial improvements, version 6.01 is the most revolutionary release I have seen since I started reviewing this product circa version 3.0.

Matt Asay: Who cares about the Novell/Microsoft patent deal?

Filed under
SUSE

Not their customers, apparently. Matthew Aslett got to talk with a joint Novell/Microsoft guinea pig (I mean, customer Smile, HSBC, and the support for the IP indemnity is underwhelming, at best: "Its a nice to have. I dont think it was a main feature for me, but its nice to have."

GNOME 2.18 (Simply Beautiful)

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Software

GNOME 2.18 is out, on time as usual. The top-class free desktop for the masses looks and feels better than ever. This is another progressive release in our road to perfection. It integrates another load of improvements done in the visual design, the performance of the desktop components, and the growing collection of integrated applications.

VirtualBox update

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Software

Innotek released a new version of its virtual machine VirtualBox. The minor update features important bug fixes and useful adjustments which are especially useful on Linux.

When I tested VirtualBox for the first time I was pretty excited. Since then Innotek has released two minor versions featuring several important bugfixes, small features and adjustments.

Use open source Subversion for personal document management

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HowTos

There is an open source version control system, or revision control system, known as Subversion (svn for short) that has rapidly become a favorite of developers. It enjoys an excellent reputation and a wealth of free, online documentation, as well as a growing body of published texts on the subject of its efficient and practical use.

Bringing Web-based applications offline

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Software

The Web 2.0 mantra suggests that you forget desktop applications and embrace AJAXified browser-based apps that you can run from any OS, anywhere, as long as you have a speedy connection to the Internet. But what about times when you can't get online? Firefox, Opera, and others are looking to make it possible run applications offline, anytime, anywhere.

A Decade of Linux & Increasingly Stronger

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Linux

The GNU Manifesto, the internet, and the Open Source movement represent a landmark, joining the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st century. Linux, produced by patient hard work, has made remarkable progress during the past decade, and is well positioned for substantial growth.

KDE 4 to be Released in October

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KDE

Hereby we, the Release Team, present a draft KDE 4.0 Release roadmap which has
been discussed on our mailinglist the past few weeks. It's an optimistic schedule
that aims to release in late October, based on 3 Beta's and 2 release candidates.

KDE 4.0 Roadmap
===============

Milestone: Subsystem Freeze
Date: 1 April 2007

Milestone: Alpha Release + kdelibs soft API Freeze

Ubuntu's Easy Business Server

Filed under
Ubuntu

On top of the migration-assistant and other features being worked on by Ubuntu developers for future releases, one of the items that has been on the table for a while is an Ubuntu Easy Business Server.

ReactOS on The Windows Tail

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OS

For more than a decade, open source developers have been trying to clone Windows. The latest release of ReactOS 0.3.1 gets them closer than ever before, but don't expect open source Vista just yet. Now, the devs are aiming to be as compatible with Windows 2003 as possible.

The new Debian etch release schedule

Filed under
Linux

After a few months of delay, then, this gives us enough information to
regroup and offer a new projected release timeline. The good news is
that we have not been sitting idle for the past months; many more RC
bugs have been fixed... and found... and fixed since the last release
update, and there have been good upgrade and install reports, which

Why the Office Format Wars are Not Over

Filed under
OSS

Gone are the days when free software could blithely ignore what was happening in the world of proprietary code. The two approaches are now inextricably intertwined as more and more users and companies choose to run both. One paradoxical consequence of this is that as free software becomes more widely deployed, Microsoft's impact on it becomes greater.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box

Security Leftovers

  • FBI detects breaches against two state voter systems
    The Federal Bureau of Investigation has found breaches in Illinois and Arizona's voter registration databases and is urging states to increase computer security ahead of the Nov. 8 presidential election, according to a U.S. official familiar with the probe. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity, said on Monday that investigators were also seeking evidence of whether other states may have been targeted. The FBI warning in an Aug. 18 flash alert from the agency's Cyber Division did not identify the intruders or the two states targeted. Reuters obtained a copy of the document after Yahoo News first reported the story Monday.
  • Russians Hacked Two U.S. Voter Databases, Say Officials [Ed: blaming without evidence again]
    Two other officials said that U.S. intelligence agencies have not yet concluded that the Russian government is trying to do that, but they are worried about it.
  • FBI Says Foreign Hackers Got Into Election Computers
    We've written probably hundreds of stories on just what a dumb idea electronic voting systems are, highlighting how poorly implemented they are, and how easily hacked. And, yet, despite lots of security experts sounding the alarm over and over again, you still get election officials ridiculously declaring that their own systems are somehow hack proof. And now, along comes the FBI to alert people that it's discovered at least two state election computer systems have been hacked already, and both by foreign entities.
  • Researchers Reveal SDN Security Vulnerability, Propose Solution
    Three Italian researchers have published a paper highlighting a security vulnerability in software-defined networking (SDN) that isn't intrinsic to legacy networks. It's not a showstopper, though, and they propose a solution to protect against it. "It" is a new attack they call Know Your Enemy (KYE), through which the bad guys could potentially collect information about a network, such as security tool configuration data that could, for example, reveal attack detection thresholds for network security scanning tools. Or the collected information could be more general in nature, such as quality-of-service or network virtualization policies.
  • NV Gains Momentum for a Secure DMZ
    When it comes to making the shift to network virtualization (NV) and software-defined networking (SDN), one of the approaches gaining momentum is using virtualization technology to build a secure demilitarized zone (DMZ) in the data center. Historically, there have been two major drawbacks to deploying firewalls as a secure mechanism inside a data center. The first is the impact a physical hardware appliance has on application performance once another network hop gets introduced. The second is the complexity associated with managing the firewall rules. NV technologies make it possible to employ virtual firewalls that can be attached to specific applications and segregate them based on risk. This is the concept of building a secure DMZ in the data center. The end result is that the virtual firewall is not only capable of examining every packet associated with a specific application, but keeping track of what specific firewall rules are associated with a particular application becomes much simpler.