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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat Academy Expands Training, Includes OpenStack Coursework Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:09pm
Story Valve Updates SteamOS With CPU/GPU Optimizations Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 11:03pm
Story Linux.conf.au, Linux Darling, and More Linux List Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:58pm
Story CyanogenMod launches new Gallery App Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:44pm
Story Linux Mint 16: No Surprises, but Plenty of Solid Improvements Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:39pm
Story AMD's Updated Catalyst Linux Driver Now Available Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:28pm
Story Fedora 18 Reached End of Life, Upgrade to Fedora 20 Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:21pm
Story Chrome 32 Has New Tab Indicators, Better Performance Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:14pm
Story Report: Android apps will soon be accepted on BlackBerry World Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:07pm
Story 8 Innovative Linux-Based Products Demoed at CES Rianne Schestowitz 14/01/2014 - 10:03pm

Installation Guide: CentOS 5.1 Desktop

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to set up a CentOS 5.1 desktop. It provides all you need for daily work and entertainment, incl. multimedia codecs, Adobe Flash, Adobe Reader, Skype, TrueType fonts, VMware Server, ntfs-3g, Sun Java, and many more.

Mandriva Flash 2008 First Look

Filed under
MDV

weblog.infoworld.com: A bootable 4 GB Flash Drive containing a portable version of Mandriva Linux 2008 is now available from Mandriva for 79 EUR ($89) and from Amazon for $94. The general idea is that you can take this little memory stick with you and be able to run Linux from it, do Internet and Office tasks with Firefox, Thunderbird, and OpenOffice, and save your files to the free space on the drive.

Linux @ Home - What a botch up

Filed under
Linux

geekzone.co.nz: OK, so after some positive use of Suse Gnome @ work on Virtual Machine, I decided to try it out at home. Had my Vista do a complete backup not too long ago, and figured, hey it should be ok. But NO, it was not.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Test Your Wireless Network Security with aircrack-ng

  • Howto: Upload your External IP while behind a router
  • Controlling Firefox Headers and Footers
  • Sharing Files Between Ubuntu Host and Virtual Machines
  • Making Mac OS X play nicely with Novell

Making your Ubuntu 7.10 Desktop look like MAC OS X Leopard

Filed under
HowTos

linuxondesktop.blogspot: MAC OS has been traditionally known for their impressive graphical interface and stability. Now even though i have been an avid Linux follower over the past 9 years I have been using Linux, still i find my self attracted to MAC OS. In this tutorial i describe step by step how to make your ubuntu desktop look more like MAC OS X Leopard.

Three Methods for Tunneling your Connections

Filed under
HowTos

tipoftheday: Sometimes, you just need to break through a troublesome gateway. Or perhaps you need to test a connection from a remote location. If you’re like most geeks, though, there’s already ample reason to do any of this — because you can.

Does Open Source Lose its Mission in Corporations?

Filed under
OSS

pcworld (idg): More and more open-source developers these days are employees of companies, paid to work on open-source projects, rather than independent programmers doing it for fun. The change raises issues for projects, programmers and employers alike.

GStreamer brings HTML5 video support to GTK/WebKit

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: The GTK port of the WebKit HTML rendering engine has gained support for the HTML5 video element. The media backend, which uses GStreamer, was implemented by Pierre-Luc Beaudoin of Collabora. Alp Toker, who also works for Collabora, integrated the backend with GTk/WebKit's Cairo graphics pipeline, making it possible for the video content to be embedded in SVG and manipulated with CSS and JavaScript.

ASUS Radeon HD 3850 & 3870

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix: Last month AMD introduced the ATI Radeon HD 3800 series as "enthusiast gaming performance for the masses" through the Radeon HD 3850 and Radeon HD 3870, which are both sub-$250 graphics cards. To see how well these two PCI Express 2.0 graphics cards are able to perform under Linux, ASUS had sent out their EAH3850 TOP and EAH3870 TOP.

Should KDE close all bugs in Bugzilla?

Filed under
KDE

bramschoenmakers.nl: At the time of this writing, we have 15210 open bugs and 13336 open wishes. The past week, 367 bugs were submitted and 294 bugs were closed, and this growth is to be seen every week. Unfortunately there's not enough manpower to cope with this. We need to find a solution or we'll drown in this bug swarm.

Review: Asus Eee laptop PC

Filed under
Hardware

absolutegadget.com: We at Absolute Gadget are as happy as the proverbial Larry when our phones, MP3 players and general gadgety stuff gets smaller with each iteration. That’s why it’s nice to see Asus apply some common sense, in the form of its teeny and affordable Eee PC.

cGmail: The End-All Mail Notifier

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Software

FOSSwire: Everybody likes to know when they have mail. It’s become a routine to get up in the morning and check before you go to work or school. Later throughout the day, most people don’t check it as often. This is where mail notifiers come in.

KDE Performance 3

Filed under
KDE

nowwhatthe.blogspot: After some raving blogs about how memory-efficient and fast KDE 4 is, I decided to test something myself.

Browse The Web Faster, Use Text Mode Browsers

Filed under
Software

junauza.blogspot: Did you know that you can surf the internet in text mode using a Linux terminal? This is made possible thru free/open-source text-based web browser.

Vista to Ubuntu (100%)

Filed under
Ubuntu

luckycala.wordpress: I had enough with eating crap with Vista. My last line of patience warned off when I happened to wait about 5 seconds when changing from one MS Doc file to another and also happened that I was running with time to finish a project report. No, I’m not running on 256 ram, it’s 1 GB.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu Guide For Windows Users: How To Play MP3 Audio Files

  • Configuring Airtel Beetel 220BX in Ubuntu
  • HTTrack: Website crawler / copier

The ASUS Eee Linux PC from the outside in

Filed under
Hardware

iTWire: I have one. I’m just one in ... well, quite a few thousand, really – but nevertheless, their supply has been surpassed by the demand. Yes, I’m talking about the ASUS Eee PC, the diminutive priced highly popular subnotebook which has brought Linux to the masses. Here are my complete first impressions and experiences, from the box through power on.

Emacs: undying hatred

Filed under
Software

briancarper.net: I spent a good six hours today using Emacs. It's by far one of the most infuriating pieces of software I've ever used.

Paludis, Gentoo and Ciaran McCreesh uncensored

Filed under
Interviews

lab.obsethryl.eu: A lot of seasoned GNU/Linux users prefer using Gentoo in production, mainly because of Portage. Despite that, Portage does have a series of issues that hinder its further development; one solution that can substitute Portage and offer a viable and far more robust alternative is Paludis.

Trolltech and KDE collaborate on Phonon

liquidat: Trolltech and KDE work together for years now: the Trolltech developers are open to KDE’s suggestions and needs, and KDE itself is a big testing framework for Trolltech’s Qt. Now this cooperation went a step further: Trolltech and KDE 4 announced that both will work together on KDE 4’s Phonon in the future.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming