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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The Magic of Simultaneous Contrast

Filed under
Howtos

The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to the idea of simultaneous contrast and to the amazing effects of color interactions. Color is the single most important tool that artists and designers used throughout the ages to beautify their environment. But to use color effectively one has to understand its basic functions, its psychological and visual impacts on the environment.

Development Release: openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 2

Filed under
Linux

Development Release: openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 2 - Andreas Jaeger has announced the second alpha release of openSUSE 10.3: "I'm glad to announce the second public alpha release of openSUSE 10.3. Call for testing: We're using the libata stack now also for IDE controllers.

Novell deal yields dividends - for Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

A "sizeable number" of developers have jumped ship from Novell to Red Hat, according to Scott Crenshaw, the senior director for product management and marketing at Red Hat.

Novell users say Linux transitions successful

Filed under
SUSE

As Novell kicks off its annual user conference, customers are enthusiastic about their transitions from the legacy NetWare operating system to Linux. There’s discord, however, among Novell users regarding the company’s controversial technology pact with Microsoft.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: Where's Mandriva?

Filed under
MDV

Big news about Linux has come out of France in the past month or so.

In February, French automaker Peugeot Citroen announced it would be migrating 20,000 Windows desktops to Linux. Then, just last week, the French Parliament, which had already decided to shift its administrative systems to Linux, announced the finalization of those plans.

Installing Ubuntu Linux on a usb pendrive

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial will show how-to install Ubuntu on a usb stick. Even though this tutorial uses Ubuntu as its base distribution, you could virtually use any type of Linux liveCD distribution.

Mozilla Security: More Than Meets The 'Aye'

Filed under
Moz/FF

If open source by definition means that code is open, then why is Mozilla having some of its code discussions behind closed doors? The reason is simple: to protect users.

Book Review: The Linux Programmer's Toolbox

Filed under
Reviews

Regular readers here know I don't say "wow" lightly. I may like a book, I may even think it's useful or even something you really should have, but very few really make my jaw drop. This is one that gets a "wow".

Introduction: FLAC, the Free Lossless Audio Codec

Filed under
Software

As you might have guessed from the title of this article, FLAC is an abbreviation of Free Lossless Audio Codec. The first word ("free") should be pretty clear (it's an open-source project), but what is a "lossless audio codec"?

Open source video editing still has a long way to go

Filed under
Software

Once or twice a year I look at FOSS video editing tools to see if they're ready for everyday use by advanced amateur and low-end professional video makers, which is where I classify myself in the video production hierarchy.

Tale of Two Operating Systems: Vista and Ubuntu

Filed under
OS

Last week I had the opportunity to try two new operating systems: Microsoft Vista (Home Premium) and the Ubuntu Linux distribution (6.10, Edgy Eft).

Shopping with the Mozilla Amazon Browser

Filed under
Software

Amazon.com is the most popular online retailer. While you can, of course, access the site with any browser, developer Fabio Serra has created Mozilla Amazon Browser (MAB), a browser-based application that relies on Mozilla's XML User Interface Language (XUL) technology to implement its graphical user interface.

Linux vs. Windows: Which is Most Secure?

Filed under
OS

I’m more secure on Linux than I am on Windows. My primary desktop is on a Macbook Pro – the best computer I’ve ever owned, without any doubt. I consider myself very open-minded and will always give credit where it’s due. Heck, some of my best friends use Windows.

Firefox Goes Where Few Browsers Have Gone Before

Filed under
Moz/FF

In 2002 the Mozilla Foundation released Mozilla 1.0, finally delivering on the promise of an open-source browser descended from the original Netscape Navigator browser code.

But while Mozilla 1.0 received many kudos from reviewers (including eWEEK Labs), it failed to make much of a dent in the 96 percent market share that Microsoft's Internet Explorer enjoyed at the time.

Happy Birthday, Penguin Pete's

Filed under
Web

Penguin Pete celebrates his site's first birthday today. We congratulate him on a most excellent site. His articles are funny, intelligent, informative, gramatically correct, and sometimes controversial. I enjoy Penguin Pete's site, frequently link to it, and hope it will be around for a long time to come.

In an article on his site today he discusses the first year and his top stories:

Linux Musings drift in from China

Filed under
Linux

Could Linux be the nearly perfect solution to the computing ills in China? Well, a little yes, and lots of no.

Notes on Submitting Content

Filed under
Site News

Lord knows I appreciate all the 'news submissions' I can get. In fact, I've often thought of asking around for a 'Number One' to help me run the site in that area. But I have a few notes for those submitting, especially if you've noticed your submission not published.

Pharmacy system using Ubuntu to fight AIDS

Filed under
Ubuntu

Written in Java and released under the GPL, iDART (intelligent Dispensing of Antiretroviral Treatment) is a pharmacy system designed for use at antiretroviral (ARV) pharmacies in the public health sector. Initially distributed only as software, it was generally implemented on machines using Windows.

A few more (cheaper!) options for burning LPs

Filed under
Hardware
Software

Recently, we described how to copy LPs, 45s and 78s to CD using the new Crosley Songwriter CD Recorder. It's an easy-to-use, $400 nostalgia-theme piece that does the job without a computer, but the hefty price is hard to ignore. But what about the computer-savvy person who doesn't have a turntable? Or the turntable owner who doesn't want to buy the Songwriter just to turn vinyl into CD?

The Importance Of Free Open Standards In The Evolution Of The Web: Tim Berners-Lee Report

Filed under
Web

The Science And Engineering Of The Common Good - The Importance Of Free Open Standards For A Healthy Evolution Of The Web: Tim Berners-Lee reports to the United States House of Representatives.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

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Tails is a live operating system that can be used from USB, SD card or DVD disc having size more than 4 GB. Tails provides better anonymity and security than any other distro or vpn service and that is the reason why Edward Snowden chooses tails for leaking NSA documents. Read
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today's leftovers

  • Romp Home with these 21 Peerless ASCII Games
    Linux has a raft of open source games. The vast majority of these games are atheistically pleasing. Popular games often have full motion video, vector graphics, 3D graphics, realistic 3D rendering, animation, texturing, a physics engine, and much more. Computer graphics have been advancing at a staggering pace. At the current rate of progress, in the next 10 years it may not be possible to distinguish computer graphics from reality. Early computer games did not have these graphic techniques. The earliest video games were text games or text-based games that used text characters rather than vector or bitmapped graphics. Text-based games are often forgotten and neglected. However, there are many ASCII gems out there waiting to be explored which are immensely addictive and great fun to play. The developers' works featured in this article focus on content and fun gameplay.
  • GNOME's Mutter 3.21.91 Brings Wayland Improvements
    Florian Müllner announced the release today of Mutter 3.21.91, the near-final version of this compositing window manager and Wayland compositor for the upcoming GNOME 3.22 desktop.
  • Red Hat CEO: Taking Open Source Beyond the Data Center
    When Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst spoke at LinuxCon last week, he hardly mentioned RHEL or the company's stack. Instead, he focused almost entirely on Linux in general and the open source development model in particular. This wasn't a surprise, as there probably isn't an organization on the planet with a deeper understanding of open source methodology and its potential. It's how it built free software into a $2 billion business. Most people familiar with Red Hat know the company's broader vision for open source -- sometimes referred to as "the open source way" -- goes beyond software, so it also wasn't much of a surprise when Whitehurst's talk strayed from data centers and workstations and into areas not normally associated with IT at all.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest Is Now Open For Entries
    Doors have opened on the Ubuntu 16.10 Wallpaper Contest. Few desktop operating systems offer amateur and professional illustrators, photographers and graphic designers the chance to have their artwork seen by millions of people around the world. But then, Ubuntu isn’t your average operating system!
  • Compact, rugged Skylake computer-on-module is big on PCIe
    Kontron’s Linux-ready “COMe-cSL6” COM Express Compact Type 6 module offers 10 PCIe lanes, up to 24GB RAM and 32GB eMMC, and industrial temperature support.
  • Credit card-sized module runs Linux on Braswell
    Axiomtek’s credit card-sized “CEM300” module runs Linux on Intel Braswell SoCs at 4-6W TDP and offers HD graphics, dual SATA III ports, and four PCIe lanes. Like Axiomtek’s Atom E3800 “Bay Trail” based CEM846 computer-on-module, its new CEM300 supports Linux and Windows, and uses the 84 x 55mm COM Express Type 10 Mini form factor. The CEM300 advances to 14nm Intel Braswell SoCs, which offer much improved Intel HD Graphics Gen8, while reducing TDPs to a 4W to 6W range. Supported models include the quad-core 1.6GHz (2.4GHz burst) Pentium N3700, the quad-core Celeron N3160, and the dual-core Celeron N3060.

Linux and Linux Foundation

  • Linux, Linus, Bradley, and Open Source Protection
    In a nutshell, this rather heated (and at times unnecessarily personal) debate has focused on when is the right time to defend the rights on the GPL. Bradley is of the view that these rights should be intrinsically defended as they are as important (if not more important) than the code. Linus is of the view that the practicalities of the software industry mean sending in the lawyers can potentially have an even more damaging effect as companies will tense up and choose to stay away.
  • Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework by Gregory Burns
  • 2016 LiFT Scholarship Winner Tetevi Placide Ekon: Learning Computer Science Online
    Tetevi Placide Ekon is a graduate student studying civil engineering at the 2iE Institute for Water and Environmental Engineering in Burkina Faso. He was one of 14 aspiring IT professionals to receive a 2016 Linux Foundation Training (LiFT) scholarship, announced this month. Since receiving his bachelor’s degree in water and environmental engineering and moving onto graduate school, he has nurtured a passion for computer science, and especially open source. Tetevi has completed free courses covering Linux, Apache big data systems and more, and he plans to use this scholarship to pursue more advanced training.
  • Raspberry Pi Zero Will Likely Be Supported On Linux 4.9
    It's looking like the Raspberry Pi Zero might be playing fine out-of-the-box with the upcoming Linux 4.9 kernel cycle. Eric Anholt posted his weekly VC4 driver status/changes. In there the Intel-turned-Broadcom developer commented, "Finally, I landed Stefan Wahren's Raspberry Pi Zero devicetree for upstream. If nothing goes wrong, the Zero should be supported in 4.9."
  • Running Caffe AlexNet/GoogleNet On Some CPUs Compared To NVIDIA CUDA
    With working on some Broadwell-EP Linux comparison benchmarks this weekend, as part of that onslaught of benchmarks I decided to run the CPU-only Caffe build on a few different Intel CPUs. For fun, afterwards I checked to see how the performance compares to Caffe with CUDA+cuDNN on a few Maxwell/Pascal GPUs.
  • A Slew Of RadeonSI Gallium3D Fixes To Kick Off The Week
    After already making a ton of improvements to the RadeonSI Gallium3D stack this month, Marek Olšák is looking to end the month on a high note with yet more fixes to the open-source AMD driver. What's more fun than seeing on a Monday morning [PATCH 00/20] Plenty of RadeonSI fixes. The 20 patches take care of a variety of RadeonSI fixes. Marek commented, "This series contains mostly fixes, i.e. for DCC, cubemaps, tessellation, texture views, Gather4, viewport depth range, etc. There are also some new HUD queries."