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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 5:08am
Story Fedora 21 Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 5:05am
Story Review: 6 business-class Chromebooks test their mettle Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 4:54am
Story OpenBSD Laptop Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 4:50am
Story Alpine 3.1.0 released Roy Schestowitz 11/12/2014 - 3:07am
Story AMDKFD -- AMD HSA On Linux -- Will Not Support 32-Bit Linux Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 11:17pm
Story OpenELEC 5.0 RC2 Is Out, It's an Awesome OS for Embedded Devices Already Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 10:10pm
Story Lamborghini Tauri 88: The $6,000 Android phone Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 8:29pm
Story F2FS On Linux 3.19 To Support Faster Boot Times Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 8:27pm
Story Firefox 35 Beta Arrives with Conference Call Features for Hello Rianne Schestowitz 10/12/2014 - 8:23pm

Ubuntu Experiences

Filed under
Ubuntu

manishtech.wordpress: I have been using Ubuntu for quite a long time and seen lots of its releases. Some of them were really groundbreaking in features. Many of them showed a new route for other distro developers. Indeed Ubuntu enjoys a strong community ahead of Fedora.

Slitaz to the rescue

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: Most of my hardware questions about my FMV-5100 have been answered, thanks to Slitaz. A quick hop, skip and jump from an installation, and I had a booting, self-configuring Linux system in place on my newest family member.

First Trek film footage unveiled

Filed under
Movies

bbc.co.uk: Lost creator JJ Abrams has unveiled footage from his Star Trek prequel at a press event in London. The clips featured US actor Chris Pine as the young Captain Kirk, Heroes star Zachary Quinto as Mr Spock and Simon Pegg as Enterprise engineer Scotty.

Tips and tricks for working on the command line

Filed under
HowTos

blogs.techrepublic.com: Anyone that has been reading these tips for any length of time knows that I am a command-line guy. It’s faster, more efficient, and more powerful. Sure, a nice GUI is great to look at, but to really get things done, give me the CLI any day.

Microsoft denies paying contractor to abandon Linux

Filed under
Microsoft

linuxworld.com: Microsoft has denied paying a Nigerian contractor US$400,000 in a bid to battle Linux's movement into the government sector.

Ubuntu 9.04 “Jaunty Jackalope” Mock-up Designs

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.com: The next Ubuntu release codenamed "Jaunty Jackalope" won't arrive until April of next year, but some people are already creating mock-ups of its desktop theme. Here are a few.

SimplyMEPIS 8.0 Beta 5 Updates Several Packages

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: ISO files of the fifth beta of SimplyMEPIS 8.0 are available.

Safe(r) public WiFi browsing under Linux

Filed under
HowTos

raiden.net: Public WiFi access abounds. 'Free WiFi', 'Internet Hot-Spot' and other slogans offer tempting but 'naked' internet access. This tutorial will show you how to use two freely available open source applications - Mozilla Firefox ('Firefox') and OpenSSH ('SSH') - to make your wireless more secure so that you don't have to 'take your clothes off', so to speak, the next time you're at Starbuck's.

Ubuntu Server Edition 8.10: Nice, But Who Uses It?

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Ubuntu 8.10, released at the end of October, includes several notable enhancements to the Server Edition. These new features augment the usability and versatility of Ubuntu on servers, but given the short lifespan of Ubuntu 8.10, I’m left wondering how many system administrators are going to use it.

Novell gets new Aussie chief

Filed under
SUSE

zdnet.com.au: Software company Novell has appointed former Oracle and Informix executive Alan Robinson to be its new managing director for Australia and New Zealand.

Open source fanciers finger Beeb's Win 7 'sales presentation'

Filed under
OSS

theregister.co.uk: The Open Source Consortium (OSC) has slammed the BBC’s recent coverage of Microsoft for providing a “sales presentation” about its forthcoming operating system, Windows 7.

The evolution of open source software

Filed under
OSS

useopensource.blogspot: If you have followed this blog for a while, you will know about my passion for open source software. I have always predicted that open source software would revolutionize the software industry, but I didn't quite understand how this would happen. I am now realizing that the future of open source software looks much different than I first expected.

KDE 4.2 is flat out going to rock

Filed under
KDE

movingparts.net: That’s my prediction. Of course, the truth of the matter is that KDE 4.2 (trunk) flat out rocks today. Seriously. I have never been more excited about the Linux desktop than I am right now.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How-To Triple Boot XP, Vista, Ubuntu Linux (Part 2)

  • create an envelope in OOo
  • Convert CloneCD disc image (.img) format to standard ISO (.iso)
  • Automated processing tools for better digital pictures
  • Examining the compilation process. part 3
  • Sun Presenter Console extension is useful but undocumented

  • Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) on Compaq Evo N610c
  • Bilski ruling: a victory on the path to ending software patents
  • When Device Support Goes Beyond Drivers
  • Linux Mint: A better Ubuntu
  • yet another reason to use linux
  • Review: All to AVI
  • Linux Void: Episode 12 - Progress?
  • The War of the Browsers
  • openSUSE 11.1 YaST preview - What’s the next step?
  • Debian gets ported to the G1
  • Review: Dell Inspiron Mini 9 netbook with Ubuntu Linux
  • Losing faith in F/LOSS, lastly because of OpenOffice.org 3.0.0
  • Debian Pure Blends
  • Interview: Amanda McPherson on the $25 Billion Linux Ecosystem
  • If The Matrix Runs on Windows
  • OpenOffice.org Achieves Ten Million Downloads
  • X3: Reunion Finally Goes Gold On Linux

How (and Why) To Wrap Your Head Around Free Software Licensing

Filed under
OSS

daniweb.com: Open source software is being taken seriously as a viable alternative to expensive proprietary applications but it's important to realize that, like its commercial brethren, it comes with a license for use. It's also important to remember that all open source licensing is not created equal.

KDE compositing in openSUSE11.1

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

kdedevelopers.org: As you might have noticed, KDE 4.1.3 has been released. The changelog part for KWin has just one change worth mentioning. But that is not the case for users of the openSUSE KDE:KDE4:Factory:Desktop packages.

How to ensure that your distribution gets rave reviews

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Companies which sell GNU/Linux distributions could increase the profile and sales of their products in one way: install them on top-tier laptops, tune them up so that everything runs like a dream and then hand them out to those who write about GNU/Linux.

First Programming Language - Python/Ruby?

Filed under
Software

terminally-incoherent.com: A little while ago we had an interesting discussion on what programming language should be taught to CS majors. I think that overwhelming number of people agreed that C++ is a solid choice because provides students with a very solid, low level background.

Booting Debian in 14 seconds

Filed under
Linux

debian-administration.org: Many readers will have heard about Arjan van de Ven and Auke Kok's work to boot an ASUS Eee 901 in 5 seconds. Inspired by this work, and because I have the same laptop, I decided to try to reproduce their results. So far I have not come very close to their 5 seconds, but I have made some significant improvements.

Go-oo: A Lighter, Faster OpenOffice, With Extras

Filed under
OOo

ostatic.com: One of the main complaints about the open source OpenOffice.org suite of productivity applications is that the applications are slow compared to the comparable Microsoft Office apps. If you've run into this problem, try Go-oo.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.