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Saturday, 23 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story LibreOffice 4.3.7 Open Source Office Suite Released with Over 100 Bug Fixes Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 5:53pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:23am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:23am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:22am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:22am
Story The Turing Phone Is Super Durable and Ultra Secure Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 8:18am
Story GNU/Linux Share of Global Page-Views Reaches New High Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:50am
Story Linux Kernel 4.0 Update Kit Now Available for Black Lab Linux 6.5, Ubuntu 15.04 Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:46am
Story Storage VP: Red Hat Gluster, Ceph see faster start than Linux Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:46am
Story Parsix GNU/Linux 7.5 Test 3 Out Now with Linux 3.14.38 LTS, Based on Debian Wheezy Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:44am

Linux Foundation Announces LinuxCon Keynotes

Filed under
Linux

(PR): The Linux Foundation confirmed keynotes for the year's highly anticipated LinuxCon. LinuxCon combines the developer and end user communities to produce more than 75 sessions that address "all matters Linux."

Linux Don't Need No Stinkin' ZFS: BTRFS Intro & Benchmarks

linux-mag.com: ZFS may be locked into the Solaris operating system but “Butter FS” is on the horizon and it’s boasting more features and better performance.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Inside the Aspire One

  • Linux fast-boot tech targets Windows users
  • What I Want the Ubuntu Server To Be
  • LinuxTag 2009 - Compiling Gentoo in Berlin
  • about:mozilla 04/21
  • Oracle guru speaks peace, MySQL old-guard cautious
  • My Days at MEPIS
  • KDE 4 Cube without compiz (Eye Candy)
  • Open-source browser gains production platform
  • Intel wants laptops to boot in two seconds
  • Desktop Virtualization Revisited Part Four: VMware Workstation
  • Talking to Simon Wardley about Ubuntu and the Cloud
  • Console network monitors
  • Savage 2 v2.0.0 Released
  • Big Brother Awards 2009
  • Comux 010001

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Eva's useful guide to Ubuntu 9.04

  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 6
  • Download Ubuntu 9.04 "Jaunty Jackalope" Faster
  • Anatomy of Linux Dynamic Libraries
  • Dropbox on openSUSE 11.1
  • Keeping the beast Pulseaudio at bay
  • 10 ways of resetting a lost linux root password
  • Virtualisation made easy
  • How to Cure a Windows Virus with Linux
  • How to install BackTrack 3 or 4 to hard drive
  • Linux Partition Recovery - Tips & Tricks
  • Pain Free Backups With GRsync and Gnome Schedule
  • Slow Down Firefox Scrolling Speed
  • Getting a Domain Name on a Dynamic Address with NoIP
  • Send SMS alerts when emerge completes
  • The Bash declare Statement
  • Nautilus Compact View quick fix

ECIS Provides A History of Microsoft's AntiCompetitive Behavior

Filed under
Microsoft

groklaw.net: It is, to the best of my knowledge, the first time that the issue of Microsoft's patent threats against Linux have been presented to a regulatory body as evidence of anticompetitive conduct.

Ex-Red-Hat brains decide to ride cloud

theregister.co.uk: Cloud computing is causing IT vendors to change their pitches on the off chance that cloud could actually end up generating some money. And to that end, rPath is shifting gears with version 5.0 of its rBuilder.

First Android netbooks surface

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Guanzhou, China-based Skytone announced the Alpha 680, a 533MHz ARM11-based netbook with a 7-inch touchscreen that appears to be the first commercial netbook running Android.

Firefox 3.0.9 security release now available

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of the Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing security and stability process, Firefox 3.0.9 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux users as a free download from getfirefox.com.

Red Hat and Fedora are Poles Apart

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: While Fedora is too bleeding edge, Red Hat (and Centos) is too conservative. They are poles apart and don't offer anything in between.

“We’re Linux” Videos: Placing Freedom Before Practicality?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: The Linux Foundation recently announced the winner and runners up of the “We’re Linux” video contest that it sponsored as a response to the well-known promotional campaigns by Microsoft and Apple. The selections are professional and inspiring, but I worry that their focus on “freedom” limits their effectiveness. Here’s why.

Abiword is Awesome

Filed under
Software

omegamormegil.wordpress: Abiword has just become my new favorite word processor. It’s always been nice for being so quick and low on resources, but the 2.6 release of Abiword has added two new features which have pushed it over the top for me.

Why I Use Linux

Filed under
Linux

pcworld.com: I am not a programmer. Yet Linux is built on the philosophical principle of freely sharing source code. This is how those who create Linux frequently advocate it. But if I'm not a programmer, and source code therefore means little to me, why do I use Linux?

Open source VS proprietary support

Filed under
OSS

toolbox.com/blogs: One of the biggest arguments people try to use against Open source programs is the supposed lack of support. In general I have found that support for open source programs is equal to and ofttimes better than that provided by proprietary companies.

The offensive Microsoft anti-Linux netbook offensive

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: Ever since the unexpected advent of netbooks Microsoft has been working to push Linux out. Microsoft have reminded us they’re a proprietary company with the offensive Windows 7 Starter Edition being limited to three apps only. Are they trying to insult us or what?

Also: Will Microsoft blow its netbook lead with Windows 7 crippleware?

CentOS 5.3 Has Keen Focus on Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: CentOS is based on Red Hat's Enterprise Linux source packages and shares in Red Hat Enterprise Linux's recent virtualization, app dev, security and storage improvements. Many of the enhancements in CentOS 5.3 come in the area of virtualization, targeted largely at scalability on large host machines.

4 Minimal Linux Desktop Distributions

Filed under
Linux

productivelinux.com: I’ve been researching concepts of minimalism as it applies to computing and personal productivity, and I’m convinced that in many cases, a minimal setup can really help you get more done.

How To Upgrade From Ext3 To Ext4 Without Formatting

Filed under
HowTos

maketecheasier.com: I did mention that the new filesystem - ext4 is stable, fast and backward compatible with ext2 and ext3. Today, we will look at how you can upgrade your existing ext3 filesystem to ext4 without reformating your hard disk.

Aaron Seigo Talks About KDE's Past and Future

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

itmanagement.earthweb: Aaron Seigo is one of the most public faces of the KDE desktop. Not only is he a long-time developer, but, for the past three years, he has been president of KDE e.V.. Now nearing the end of his time as president, he talked about KDE's recent past and near future, and his role in both.

Red Hat maps open source activity. France is #1

Filed under
OSS

blog.internetnews.com: Red Hat today published a new study together with Georgia Tech mapping open source activity across 75 countries. Officially called the Open Source Index (OSI), the final score is made of a number of factors including policies, practices in the Government, Industry, and Community.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation on Value of GNU/Linux Skills

  • Jobs Report: Rapid Growth in Demand for Open-Source Tech Talent
    The need for open-source technology skills are on the rise and companies and organizations continue to increase their recruitment of open-source technology talent, while offering additional training and certification opportunities for existing staff in order to fill skills gaps, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report, released today by The Linux Foundation and Dice. 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open-source talent, and nearly half (48%) report their organizations have begun to support open-source projects with code or other resources for the explicit reason of recruiting individuals with those software skills. After a hiatus, Linux skills are back on top as the most sought after skill with 80% of hiring managers looking for tech professionals with Linux expertise. 55% of employers are now also offering to pay for employee certifications, up from 47% in 2017 and only 34% in 2016.
  • Market value of open source skills on the up
    The demand for open source technology skills is soaring, however, 87% of hiring managers report difficulty finding open source talent, according to the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report which was released this week.
  • SD Times news digest: Linux Foundation releases open-source jobs report, Android Studio 3.2 beta and Rust 1.27
    The Linux Foundation in collaboration with Dice.com has revealed the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report. The report is designed to examine trends in open-source careers as well as find out which skills are the most in demand. Key findings included 83 percent of hiring managers believes hiring open source talent is a priority and Linux is the most in-demand open-source skill. In addition, 57 percent of hiring managers are looking for people with container skills and many organizations are starting to get more involved in open-source in order to attract developers.

GNU/Linux Servers as Buzzwords: "Cloud" and "IaaS"

  • Linux: The new frontier of enterprise in the cloud
    Well obviously, like you mentioned, we've been a Linux company for a long time. We've really seen Linux expand along the lines of a lot of the things that are happening in the enterprise. We're seeing more and more enterprise infrastructure become software centric or software defined. Red Hat's expanded their portfolio in storage, in automation with the Ansible platform. And then the really big trend lately with Linux has been Linux containers and technologies like [Google] Cooper Netties. So, we're seeing enterprises want to build new applications. We're seeing the infrastructure be more software defined. Linux ends up becoming the foundation for a lot of the things going on in enterprise IT these days.
  • Why next-generation IaaS is likely to be open source
    This is partly down to Kubernetes, which has done much to popularise container technology, helped by its association with Docker and others, which has ushered in a period of explosive innovation in the ‘container platform’ space. This is where Kubernetes stands out, and today it could hold the key to the future of IaaS.

Ubuntu: Snapcraft, Intel, AMD Patches, and Telemetry

  • SD Times Open-Source Project of the Week: Snapcraft
    Canonical, the company behind operating system and Linux distribution Ubuntu, is looking to help developers package, distribute and update apps for Linux and IoT with its open-source project Snapcraft. According to Evan Dandrea, engineering manager at Canonical, Snapcraft “is a platform for publishing applications to an audience of millions of Linux users.” The project was initially created in 2014, but recently underwent rebranding efforts.
  • Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Now Certified on Select Intel NUC Mini PCs and Boards for IoT Development, LibreOffice 6.0.5 Now Available, Git 2.8 Released and More
    Canonical yesterday announced that Ubuntu 16.04 LTS is certified on select Intel NUC Mini PCs and boards for IoT development. According to the Ubuntu blog post, this pairing "provides benefits to device manufacturers at every stage of their development journey and accelerates time to market." You can download the certified image from here. In other Canonical news, yesterday the company released a microcode firmware update for Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the Spectre vulnerability, Softpedia reports. The updated amd64-microcode packages for AMD CPUs are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), "all AMD users are urged to update their systems."
  • Canonical issues Spectre v2 fix for all Ubuntu systems with AMD chips
    JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT YOU'D HEARD THE END of Spectre, Canonical has released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users that have AMD processors in a bid to rid of the vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were made public at the beginning of this year, affecting literally billions of devices that had been made in the past two decades.
  • A first look at desktop metrics
    We first announced our intention to ask users to provide basic, not-personally-identifiable system data back in February. Since then we have built the Ubuntu Report tool and integrated it in to the Ubuntu 18.04 LTS initial setup tool. You can see an example of the data being collected on the Ubuntu Report Github page.

Most secure Linux distros in 2018

Think of a Linux distribution as a bundle of software delivered together, based on the Linux kernel - a kernel being the core of a system that connects software to hardware and vice versa – with a GNU operating system and a desktop environment, giving the user a visual way to operate the system via a graphical user interface. Linux has a reputation as being more secure than Windows and Mac OS due to a combination of factors – not all of them about the software. Firstly, although desktop Linux users are on the up, Linux environments are far less common in the grand scheme of things than Windows devices on personal computers. The Linux community also tends to be more technical. There are technical reasons too, including fundamental differences in the way the distribution architecture tends to be structured. Nevertheless over the last decade security-focused distributions started to appear, which will appeal to the privacy-conscious user who wants to avoid the worldwide state-sanctioned internet spying that the west has pioneered and where it continues to innovate. Of course, none of these will guarantee your privacy, but they're a good start. Here we list some of them. It is worth noting that security best practices are often about process rather than the technology, avoiding careless mistakes like missing patches and updates, and using your common sense about which websites you visit, what you download, and what you plug into your computer. Read more