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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 21 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OpenMandriva 3 Alpha, Debian LTS Recruitment, & Gentoo Git Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 7:42am
Story Debian Release Roy Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 6:56am
Story Open-source IoT kit runs OpenWRT, mimics Arduino Yun Rianne Schestowitz 25/04/2015 - 12:25am
Story Debian 7 Wheezy and Debian 8 Jessie Might Become LTS Releases Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 9:26pm
Story World’s smallest i.MX6 module has onboard WiFi, eMMC Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 7:12pm
Story BQ Aquaris E4.5 Ubuntu Edition review Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 7:07pm
Story Mixing the Ingredients Together – Announcing OpenMandriva Lx 3 Alpha Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 7:00pm
Story Scientists Use Ubuntu to Interpret Hubble Telescope Data Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 6:56pm
Story GNOME 3.17/3.18 Schedule available Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 6:24pm
Story Enterprises still miss the real point of open source Rianne Schestowitz 24/04/2015 - 5:15pm

Taking LXDE For a Test Drive

Filed under
Software

maketecheasier.com: There are a lot of contenders in the ring when it comes to open source desktop environments. I’d been hearing more and more about a new challenger for the lightweight crown, LXDE. Can it stack up against the likes of Window Maker, Enlightenment, and Openbox?

Just how strong is Red Hat's open-source business?

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: Red Hat stands alone as the only significant public open-source company. Is this a testament to its execution, or is it a hint that open source is not well-suited to big business?

Six Levels Of Linux Customization

Filed under
Linux

customdistros.com: I’ve noticed that if you spend any time investigating the benefits of using Linux you will undoubtedly run across a few people commenting on how customizable it is. A person can tweak their desktop to make it look and behave to their precise liking.

Kernel Log: 3D support for Radeon; new Intel drivers

Filed under
Linux

h-online.com: Developers for AMD and Intel graphics chips have been extremely productive, having introduced a range of improvements, with others in the works. Developers of the xf86-video-intel graphics driver – "intel" for short – have released version 2.7.0 of the driver.

Mac Users Prefer Linux Over Windows

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: Apple users are the most dedicated and fervent operating system fans. However, when given the option of a Linux-based computer or a Windows-based one, 100% say they would rather use Linux.

Music Notation Software for Linux: a Progress Report, Part 2

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: In this article, I conclude my status report on the development of some of the most active notation software projects for Linux.

The packages with the worst build systems in the world.

Filed under
Software

silentcoder.co.za: Some packages have excruciatingly complex build systems, that are hard to master, harder to package… and in short, the bane of a distribution developer’s existence. Herewith, my top list of packages with the most terribly stupid build system:

Xubuntu 9.04: Where’s the beef?

Filed under
Ubuntu

celettu.wordpress: It’s hard to see the point of Xubuntu. Most of the polish and new features Canonical comes up with are reserved for Ubuntu itself, and I feel that side projects like Xubuntu and Kubuntu just can’t keep up.

KDE 4.2, NEPOMUK and Linux distributions

Filed under
KDE

rudd-o.com: NEPOMUK and Strigi do not work in the vast majority of Linux distributions. We'll see why, and how we can fix that.

Intel Core i7 Virtualization Performance

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: Earlier this month we published Intel Core i7 Linux benchmarks that looked at the overall desktop performance when running Ubuntu Linux. One area we had not looked at in the original article was the virtualization performance.

Linux Foundation Announces LinuxCon Keynotes

Filed under
Linux

(PR): The Linux Foundation confirmed keynotes for the year's highly anticipated LinuxCon. LinuxCon combines the developer and end user communities to produce more than 75 sessions that address "all matters Linux."

Linux Don't Need No Stinkin' ZFS: BTRFS Intro & Benchmarks

linux-mag.com: ZFS may be locked into the Solaris operating system but “Butter FS” is on the horizon and it’s boasting more features and better performance.

today's leftovers:

Filed under
News
  • Inside the Aspire One

  • Linux fast-boot tech targets Windows users
  • What I Want the Ubuntu Server To Be
  • LinuxTag 2009 - Compiling Gentoo in Berlin
  • about:mozilla 04/21
  • Oracle guru speaks peace, MySQL old-guard cautious
  • My Days at MEPIS
  • KDE 4 Cube without compiz (Eye Candy)
  • Open-source browser gains production platform
  • Intel wants laptops to boot in two seconds
  • Desktop Virtualization Revisited Part Four: VMware Workstation
  • Talking to Simon Wardley about Ubuntu and the Cloud
  • Console network monitors
  • Savage 2 v2.0.0 Released
  • Big Brother Awards 2009
  • Comux 010001

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Eva's useful guide to Ubuntu 9.04

  • Linux Migration for the Home PC User, Part 6
  • Download Ubuntu 9.04 "Jaunty Jackalope" Faster
  • Anatomy of Linux Dynamic Libraries
  • Dropbox on openSUSE 11.1
  • Keeping the beast Pulseaudio at bay
  • 10 ways of resetting a lost linux root password
  • Virtualisation made easy
  • How to Cure a Windows Virus with Linux
  • How to install BackTrack 3 or 4 to hard drive
  • Linux Partition Recovery - Tips & Tricks
  • Pain Free Backups With GRsync and Gnome Schedule
  • Slow Down Firefox Scrolling Speed
  • Getting a Domain Name on a Dynamic Address with NoIP
  • Send SMS alerts when emerge completes
  • The Bash declare Statement
  • Nautilus Compact View quick fix

ECIS Provides A History of Microsoft's AntiCompetitive Behavior

Filed under
Microsoft

groklaw.net: It is, to the best of my knowledge, the first time that the issue of Microsoft's patent threats against Linux have been presented to a regulatory body as evidence of anticompetitive conduct.

Ex-Red-Hat brains decide to ride cloud

theregister.co.uk: Cloud computing is causing IT vendors to change their pitches on the off chance that cloud could actually end up generating some money. And to that end, rPath is shifting gears with version 5.0 of its rBuilder.

First Android netbooks surface

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Guanzhou, China-based Skytone announced the Alpha 680, a 533MHz ARM11-based netbook with a 7-inch touchscreen that appears to be the first commercial netbook running Android.

Firefox 3.0.9 security release now available

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla.org: As part of the Mozilla Corporation’s ongoing security and stability process, Firefox 3.0.9 is now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux users as a free download from getfirefox.com.

Red Hat and Fedora are Poles Apart

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: While Fedora is too bleeding edge, Red Hat (and Centos) is too conservative. They are poles apart and don't offer anything in between.

“We’re Linux” Videos: Placing Freedom Before Practicality?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: The Linux Foundation recently announced the winner and runners up of the “We’re Linux” video contest that it sponsored as a response to the well-known promotional campaigns by Microsoft and Apple. The selections are professional and inspiring, but I worry that their focus on “freedom” limits their effectiveness. Here’s why.

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More in Tux Machines

KDE on Android: CI, CD & SDK

I guess we all agree that one of the biggest stoppers to get a contribution out is the ability to get the system ready to start working on the contribution. Today I want to talk a bit about generating Android binaries from our machine. In the KDE Edu sprint we had the blatant realisation that it’s very frustrating to keep pushing the project while not being swift at delivering fresh packages of our applications in different systems. We looked into windows, flatpak, snap and, personally, I looked into Android once again. Nowadays, KDE developers develop the applications on their systems and then create the binaries on their systems as well. Usually it’s a team effort where possibly just one person in the team will be familiar with Android and have the development combo in place: Android SDK, Android NDK, Qt binaries and often several KDE Frameworks precompiled. Not fun and a fairly complex premise. Read more Also:

today's howtos

Linux Kernel and Security: LVM2, Containers, AMD

  • LVM2 Begins Work On Major Changes To Logical Volume Management
    LVM2 as the user-space tools for Logical Volume Management (LVM) on Linux is in the process of going through a big re-work.
  • Containers and Cloud Security
    The idea behind this blog post is to take a new look at how cloud security is measured and what its impact is on the various actors in the cloud ecosystem. From the measurement point of view, we look at the vertical stack: all code that is traversed to provide a service all the way from input web request to database update to output response potentially contains bugs; the bug density is variable for the different components but the more code you traverse the higher your chance of exposure to exploitable vulnerabilities. We’ll call this the Vertical Attack Profile (VAP) of the stack. However, even this axis is too narrow because the primary actors are the cloud tenant and the cloud service provider (CSP). In an IaaS cloud, part of the vertical profile belongs to the tenant (The guest kernel, guest OS and application) and part (the hypervisor and host OS) belong to the CSP. However, the CSP vertical has the additional problem that any exploit in this piece of the stack can be used to jump into either the host itself or any of the other tenant virtual machines running on the host. We’ll call this exploit causing a failure of containment the Horizontal Attack Profile (HAP). We should also note that any Horizontal Security failure is a potentially business destroying event for the CSP, so they care deeply about preventing them. Conversely any exploit occurring in the VAP owned by the Tenant can be seen by the CSP as a tenant only problem and one which the Tenant is responsible for locating and fixing. We correlate size of profile with attack risk, so the large the profile the greater the probability of being exploited.
  • Canonical Releases AMD Microcode Updates for All Ubuntu Users to Fix Spectre V2
    Canonical released a microcode update for all Ubuntu users with AMD processors to address the well-known Spectre security vulnerability. The Spectre microprocessor side-channel vulnerabilities were publicly disclosed earlier this year and discovered to affect billions of devices made in the past two decades. Unearthed by Jann Horn of Google Project Zero, the second variant (CVE-2017-5715) of the Spectre vulnerability is described as a branch target injection attack.

Programming: 5 Pillars of Learning Programming, New Releases of Rust and Git

  • 5 Pillars of Learning Programming
    Learning how to program is hard. I often find that university courses and boot camps miss important aspects of programming and take poor approaches to teaching rookies. I want to share the 5 basic pillars I believe a successful programming course should build upon. As always, I am addressing the context of mainstream web applications. A rookie’s goal is to master the fundamentals of programming and to understand the importance of libraries and frameworks. Advanced topics such as the cloud, operations in general, or build tools should not be part of the curriculum. I am also skeptical when it comes to Design Patterns. They presume experience that beginners never have.
  • The Rust Programming Language Blog: Announcing Rust 1.27
    The Rust team is happy to announce a new version of Rust, 1.27.0. Rust is a systems programming language focused on safety, speed, and concurrency.
  • Rust 1.27 Released With SIMD Improvements
    Most notable to Rust 1.27 is SIMD support via the std::arch module to make use of SIMD (Single Instruction, Multiple Data) instructions directly. Up to now Rust could already make use of LLVM's auto-vectorization support, but this lets Rust developers write SIMD instructions on their own and to allow for the proper Rust code to be executed based upon the CPU at run-time.
  • Git 2.18 Released With Initial Version Of Its New Wire Protocol
    Version 2.18 of the Git distributed revision control system is now available. Arguably most notable about Git 2.18 is the introduction of its new wire protocol "protocol_v2" that is designed to offer much greater performance. This new protocol is designed to be much faster and is already being used at Google and elsewhere due to the significant performance benefits.
  • Git v2.18.0
    The latest feature release Git v2.18.0 is now available at the usual places. It is comprised of 903 non-merge commits since v2.17.0, contributed by 80 people, 24 of which are new faces.