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Saturday, 19 Aug 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Microsoft's China Syndrome Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 1:28pm
Story Ubuntu Studio 14.04 LTS Trusty Tahr : Video Review and Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 1:21pm
Story Perl 5.20.0 released Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 1:13pm
Story Antergos 2014.05.26 Distro Powered by Numix Looks Stunning Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 1:10pm
Story Randa: Moving KDE Forward Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 1:05pm
Story WRITE YOUR FIRST LINUX KERNEL MODULE Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 12:47pm
Story wattOS R8 review – Debian greenie Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 10:41am
Story When digital marketing meets open source Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 10:16am
Story Leadwerks partners with Ubuntu for Linux games development Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 10:14am
Story Cinnamon PPA will no longer be maintained for Ubuntu users Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:44am

Defense wraps up closing argument in Hans Reiser trial

Filed under
Reiser

sfgate.com (AP): The defense attorney for a software programmer accused of killing his estranged wife told jurors Monday the prosecution hasn't proved the woman is dead, let alone murdered.

Media collection software in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: Around three years ago, when I began my adventure with ‘the penguin’, I had been looking for an application to catalog CDs. They were either ugly, or limited in functionality. This time, I didn’t think of giving up. In the repo I found mainly the old and abandoned (for nearly four years) GTKtalog, CdCat, Kat and Katalog and a program which made me stop for a moment - GWhere.

Hardy Heron reflects Ubuntu Linux ambitions

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Hardy Heron reflects Ubuntu Linux ambitions

  • Ubuntu Linux takes on enterprise server market with new OS
  • Ubuntu 7.10 - Final Review

PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

amateurscientist18.blogspot: Its almost an year that I had my first date with PCLinuxOS. I was pretty comfortable with it from day 1. It came well bundled with a host of applications, both Geeky and non-Geeky.

Debian Weekly News - April 21st, 2008

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to the first issue of the Debian Project News, the newsletter for the Debian community! From now on we'll keep you informed about recent events and interesting developments in and around the Debian Community on a biweekly basis. But we could still use some help, so feel free.

An Apple User Tries Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: I’m an Apple user. Long time, pure bred, never owned anything else. The Macintosh is, without a doubt, one of my favorite things. I reveal my Apple snobbery because I want you to know where I was coming from when I sat down to try Ubuntu, the Linux distro.

Open source applications Keep You Safe

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Personal data safety is big business lately. There are a variety of ways to protect your identity or keep your personal information from the prying eyes of dishonest people, but Eric Wolbrom has what he believes is a unique service. Keep You Safe makes it possible for subscribers to store all their personal data securely in a virtual online "safe deposit box," and share the key with someone they trust.

Upgrades and Compatibility in the Open Source World

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: Engineers like to solve new problems. So it should come as no surprise that hardware and software engineers have wrestled for years with the issue of "backward compatibility" -- the idea that new hardware and software should be just like the old hardware and software, only faster, more reliable, and better.

Unlocking The Future: Open Source Opportunities In Custom Systems

Filed under
OSS

crn.com: Custom system builders are among the specialists able to embrace open source as a new prospect for success. Linux's emergence as a completely viable open source operating system has attracted many start-ups on a budget, in addition to a growing recognition by proprietary vendors (and their enterprise and SMB clients) of the benefits of open solutions.

Dragbox bridges command line and desktop

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The GNU/Linux command line and desktop are both sophisticated interfaces, but they are mostly separate realities. You can drag text into a virtual terminal from the desktop, or use Edit -> Copy to move text in either direction, but by default moving files and directories between them is impossible. Dragbox is designed to solve this problem.

Whither the Linux Foundation?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: We live in the age of the spinmeister, the age when language is used more as a means to confuse than to educate, an age when obfuscation is preferred to clarification. I've been wondering what is important - the Foundation itself or the kernel.

Why Microsoft should not lose (and free software will still win)

Filed under
OS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: There has always been a section of the free software community which has an anti-Microsoft agenda. It’s almost like their mission statement is “It’s not over until Microsoft is dead”. Certainly there is a lot of feeling that if Microsoft went away, a lot of our problem would be over. But do Microsoft even need to “lose”; is there even a battle to be fought and if so what would constitute winning it?

New Distro Releases on the Horizon

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Spring is in the air and that can only mean one thing: several popular Linux distributions are getting ready for their next release. Let's take a look at the upcoming versions of Fedora, Ubuntu, and openSUSE to see what's new, what's improved, and what will be worth the wait.

Did Canonical Just Get Punked by Red Hat and Novell?

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: My first opinion during all of this hooplah was that why should I care about Red Hat and SUSE Linux not having a consumer desktop line? It doesn't detract from the Linux desktop as a whole (since their business desktop products are doing just fine, thank you), plus let's face it: Ubuntu is kicking butt and taking names. Except I think I may have been wrong.

Also: Red Hat, Novell, Canonical and the free software desktop

Microsoft Office 2007 Fails OOXML Conformance Tests

Filed under
Microsoft

groklaw.net: This takes the cake. Alex Brown has just admitted on his Griffin Brown blog and further to ZDNET UK's Peter Judge that Microsoft Office 2007 has failed two OOXML conformance tests he ran. Color me surprised.

The Trials and Travails of Linux on a Laptop

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Over the years I've been slowly working towards getting myself a laptop, but ultimately one thing or another stopped me. But these days you almost can't live without one. So I finally made the plunge. But obviously before I did that I also spent a decent amount of time researching whether or not Linux or Freebsd would work on said laptop before I bought it.

Is it lift off for Linux?

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

bbc.co.uk/blogs: I had a very interesting conversation with Mr Ubuntu, aka Mark Shuttleworth, at the end of last week. His main point was that Linux, and use of Ubuntu, was on the rise. He also had lots of interesting things to say about open source more broadly, the Microsoft-Yahoo deal etc, which I thought I'd detail here as a Q&A.

One last, good look at KDE 3

Filed under
KDE

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: I initially loved KDE over Gnome. It looked more like Windows, it had more neat options, and great programs. But I left KDE for Gnome for a few reasons. But now I want to look at KDE again because a few things have come together to change some of the reasons why I left KDE.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 249

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at Draco GNU/Linux 0.3

  • News: Fedora 9 delay, Ubuntu 8.04 LTS release, openSUSE's OBS update, Red Hat and
  • OpenSolaris desktops, Gobuntu vs gNewSense, sidux-seminarix

  • Released last week: BeleniX 0.7, DragonFly BSD 1.12.2
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 8.04 LTS
  • New distributions: Turtle Kevux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Add faceted search to Thunderbird with Seek

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: Do you struggle to keep tabs on your Thunderbird inbox? The SIMILE Seek extension might be the answer to your problems. The extension adds faceted browsing to Thunderbird, which allows you to search and manage your email messages in a radically different way than you are used to.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: GnuCash, Minuet, Citrix, and YouTube

  • Escape from QuickBooks (with data in hand)
    When a small business contemplates getting away from a proprietary accounting tool like QuickBooks in favor of free software like GnuCash, the first order of business is usually finding a way to liberate that business's accounting data for input into a new system. Strangely enough, Intuit, the creator of QuickBooks, never quite got around to making that easy to do. But it turns out that, with a bit of effort, this move can be made. Getting there involves wandering through an undocumented wilderness; this article is at attempt to make things easier for the next people to come along.
  • Minuet – a guitar adventure
    As you remember from my last post, minuet currently supports multiple plugins to display its exercises. To change from one plugin to another, all you have to do is to press on the desired instrument name: for now, only “Guitar” and “Piano” are available.
  • Available Now: Linux VDA 7.15 LTSR!
    Originally, XenApp and XenDesktop releases occurred around once a year, similar to the Academy Awards, and contained significant updates. Many large enterprise customers needed to assess which version would be ideal to standardize their main production environment on for the coming years, unlike other customers seeking the latest features and capabilities who felt that the releases were not soon enough or feature requirements had changed over time.
  • [Video] YouTube screws us again and Linux is screwing itself.
    Google is up to their old tricks again.They have figured how to ripoff their content providers with a new ad algorithm. Meanwhile, Linux podcasting is a clown show and I'm sick of dealing with it.

Fedora: Fedora + Plasma + Unity, Design Interns, and New ISO Build

  • Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks?
    Hybrid things aren't usually the best option around. Like hybrid cars, for example. Technically, when you marry concepts, you change the energy state, and while this could make sense in that you blend the best of several worlds, when this is done in a forced manner over a short period of time rather than eons of evolution, you end with the worst bits as the product of your mutation. I read about the United theme for Plasma a few months ago, and given that I've spent a fair deal of time fiddling with themes and icons and fonts and making different desktop environments look prettier than their defaults, I was intrigued. So I decided to see whether the notion of having Plasma look like Unity is a sane option. Let us.  Fedora + Plasma + Unity = Nice looks? [...] What is thy point, Vanessa, the astute among you may ask? Well, I have nothing against United or its creators, but I did come to the conclusion that too much tweaking is worse than no tweaking, if this statement makes sense. I like the notion of trying to overcome the inherent problems in each desktop through the use of themes and extensions. After all, I've been doing that profusely for the past few months. But it gets undone when you cross the desktop environment space. Making Gnome better yes. Making Plasma better, absolutely. Unity as an overlay for Plasma, well tricky. There's too much disparity for you to be able to hide the underlying workflow mechanisms and UI philosophies. Then, every little inconsistency glares. You notice things you do not expect, and you get angry because there are certain things you do expect. Some transformations work quite well because they build on the foundations, e.g. various Gnome panels or Macbuntu. But Plasma has its own special charm and flow and making it into a weird version of Unity, which itself is a weird version of Gnome misses the bigger picture. And so, if you're asking me, Plasma and Unity are two separate worlds, best enjoyed in isolation. United is an interesting notion, but it also signifies the upper limit for my own wild ideas and tweaking. Yes, you can make it work, then again, it means taking away from the beauty and style of what these two desktops do, and that's not the purpose of my pimping guides. So we shall stop here, and explore other colors and shapes. Have fun, little penguins.
  • Fedora Design Interns 2017
    Here’s an update on internships. Older post linked to here. Quick recap: there’s been 2 long-term interns for Fedora design team since February, and one short-term guy, who came for 2 weeks at the beginning of June. Guys have been doing an amazing job, I can’t stress enough how happy I am to have them around.
  • F26-20170815 Updated ISOs released

today's howtos

Security: Hardware Back Doors, Microsoft Windows, Kronos

  • Hiding malware in boobytrapped replacement screens would undetectably compromise your mobile device
     

    On the one hand, if you let an untrusted stranger install hardware in your electronic device, you're opening yourself up to all kinds of potential mischief; on the other hand, an estimated one in five smartphones has a cracked screen and the easiest, most efficient and cheapest way to get that fixed is to go to your corner repair-shop.  

  • How hackers {sic} are targeting the shipping industry [iophk: "Microsoft TCO"]
     

    Whenever one of the firm's fuel suppliers would send an email asking for payment, the virus simply changed the text of the message before it was read, adding a different bank account number.  

  • Locky ransomware is back from the dead with two new strains [iophk: "Windows TCO"]
     

    What hasn't changed, though, is the method of distribution.Rather than rifling through the trove of spilt US National Security Agency exploits, as the groups behind WannaCry and NotPetya did, Locky is distributed via phishing emails containing malicious Microsoft Office files or zipped attachments containing a malicious script.

  • Connected cars could have an airbag problem
     

    "It's not the car manufacturers' fault, and it's not a problem introduced by them. The security issue that we leveraged in our research lies in the standard that specifies how the car device network (i.e., CAN) works," added Trend.

    [...] To eliminate the risk entirely, an updated CAN standard should be proposed, adopted, and implemented. This whole process would likely require another generation of vehicles."

  • Code chunk in Kronos malware used long before MalwareTech published it
    A chunk of code found in the Kronos bank-fraud malware originated more than six years before security researcher Marcus Hutchins is accused of developing the underlying code, a fellow security researcher said Friday. The conclusion, reached in an analysis of Kronos published by security firm Malwarebytes, by no means proves or disproves federal prosecutors' allegations that Hutchins wrote Kronos code and played a role in the sale of the malware. It does, however, clarify speculation over a Tweet from January 2015, in which MalwareTech—the online handle Hutchins used—complained that a complex piece of code he had published a month earlier had been added to an unnamed malware sample without his permission.
  • Secret chips in replacement parts can completely hijack your phone’s security
    People with cracked touch screens or similar smartphone maladies have a new headache to consider: the possibility the replacement parts installed by repair shops contain secret hardware that completely hijacks the security of the device. The concern arises from research that shows how replacement screens—one put into a Huawei Nexus 6P and the other into an LG G Pad 7.0—can be used to surreptitiously log keyboard input and patterns, install malicious apps, and take pictures and e-mail them to the attacker. The booby-trapped screens also exploited operating system vulnerabilities that bypassed key security protections built into the phones. The malicious parts cost less than $10 and could easily be mass-produced. Most chilling of all, to most people, the booby-trapped parts could be indistinguishable from legitimate ones, a trait that could leave many service technicians unaware of the maliciousness. There would be no sign of tampering unless someone with a background in hardware disassembled the repaired phone and inspected it.