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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Are You Looking Forward to GNOME 3? srlinuxx 06/04/2011 - 3:19am
Story MeeGo source code now available srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 11:22pm
Story Ditching KDE Applications srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 11:19pm
Story 63 Top Commercial Open Source Projects srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 11:15pm
Story How big is Google, really? srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 11:13pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04 - What Have They Done?! srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 11:10pm
Story Another Benefit To Wayland: Its Screensaver srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 8:28pm
Story Elementary OS Review srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 8:26pm
Story Foresight Linux 2.5 review srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 8:23pm
Story ShipIt comes to an end srlinuxx 05/04/2011 - 8:22pm

Is Linux Ready for Small Biz?

Filed under
Linux

Many small businesses have avoided Linux for a variety of reasons: not enough applications, complexity of installation or that it requires too much technical know-how to run. The technology has matured over many years, which raises the question: how valid are these considerations today?

Why now is the best time to switch to linux

Filed under
Linux

Today’s Linux is leaps and bounds ahead of yesterday’s. It is absolutely amazing to see how far Linux has come in 10, 5, and even 1 year ago. It is now a full featured lock and load desktop operating system that easily rivals windows. Now if we could only remove the fear factor that I discussed earlier get people to see the light.

Sabayon Linux 3.2 Mini Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Sabayon Linux is a relatively new distribution that is known for its looks with the inclusion of AIGLX, XGL, and Beryl. After the recent release of Sabayon Linux 3.2, the Mini Edition of the 3.2 branch has now been updated. Updates include newer ATI and NVIDIA proprietary display drivers, full NTFS read/write support out-of-the-box, and many other package updates and changes. It also looks very nice from the desktop side with its LiveCD. The Screenshots.

Immune your files from accidental deletion

Filed under
HowTos

Okay, when you accidentally type
rm LoveLetterFromJane.txt
Your file are gone, can’t resume it at trash, there are no trash, the document are important to you! Oh My God!! you smack your box!

Jono Bacon: Features vs. Freedom

Filed under
Ubuntu

Recently there has been a lot of discussion bubbling up regarding the possibility that Ubuntu will ship proprietary 3D drivers by default for some video cards. My aim here is not to discuss the specifics of that decision, which is still being fleshed out and ratified, but to instead define my views on the bigger picture behind the discussion - features vs. freedom.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 182

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Distributions in 2006

  • News: Fedora revamps RPM, KNOPPIX 5.1, Debian release update, Arch Linux Office Install CD, Dreamlinux interview
  • Released last week: SabayonLinux 3.2 "miniEdition", VectorLinux 5.8
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2007, K12LTSP Linux 6.0
  • New distributions: Kuliax
  • Reader comments

Read more in this year's final issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Review: Thunderbird 2.0 Beta 1 Adds New Look And Feel

Filed under
Moz/FF

Mozilla, the developer of the free Thunderbird e-mail client, has taken a good program and made it better with the release of the version 2.0 beta 1. It is rare that a beta release is not buggy, clunky, and generally a mess -- especially when, as word has it, the developers are changing the code base -- but I was pleasantly surprised by its stability and the dearth of issues.

HOWTO compile SuperTux 0.3.0 (Milestone 1.9) on Ubuntu Edgy

Filed under
HowTos

SuperTux 0.3.0 has been out for hours now. What are you waiting for? Debian (unstable) and Ubuntu (Dapper or Edgy) users:

Linux Security: A Big Edge Over Windows

Filed under
Linux

Linux is better at locking down a computer than Windows. The Linux OS uses configuration settings and user permissions to a much more efficient degree than the Windows administrator account.

Open Source Investment Rose 131% in 2006

Filed under
OSS

The amount of venture capital funding invested in the Linux and open source-related vendors tracked by Computer Business Review rose 131% in 2006, vastly outpacing the IT market as a whole.

Ghost in the machine

Brent Northcutt is something of a ghost in the machine. As a system programmer for I-Land, the 32-year-old Warrensburg resident works his magic in languages with names such as PHP, Perl, and C++. A dedicated adherent to what is known in the virtual realm as the open source movement, Mr. Northcutt is most at home in the Unix-based Linux operating system.

Linux and its closing window of opportunity with OEMs

Filed under
Linux

I am planning on changing the world with this article. I can’t do it on my own: I need your help. Despite what people say, Linux does not have a significant slice just yet. By “significant slice”, here I mean 20% to 30%. We are nowhere near it, in fact.

Review: Stratus ftServer 4300

Filed under
Reviews

Lots of companies sell Linux servers, but how many promise 99.999% uptime? Not very many, but Stratus Technologies sells systems that offer the kind of fault tolerance that will handle mission-critical applications and leave admins with peace of mind. I had a chance to test out one of the company's ftServer 4300 systems, and it's an impressive system.

Pulling a story about the company’s name out of Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Ever wonder why Linux company Red Hat is called that? In an interview with Red Hat Magazine, co-founder BobYoung said that the red hat has long been a symbol of freedom, with revolutionaries in both America and France donning red caps during their uprisings.

Howtos and Tips, & tricks

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Mplayer in Ubuntu

  • Compiling RPM From Source RPMs
  • Install and Configure Apache2 with PHP5 and SSL Support in Debian Etch
  • Basics for the command line - for newbies

Opera 9.10 Released

Filed under
Software

Opera 9.10 has been officially released this morning. Having appeared on mirrors several days ago, this release was announced just this morning. This update brings some important bug fixes such as no more crashes with Flash 9, smooth scrolling fixed, and fixes to the Fraud Protection feature.

Also: Install Opera Web Browser in Ubuntu

Various ways of detecting rootkits in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Consider this scenario... Your machine running GNU/Linux has been penetrated by a hacker without your knowledge and he has swapped the passwd program which you use to change the user password with one of his own. His passwd program has the same name as the real passwd program and works flawlessly in all respects except for the fact that it will also gather data residing on your machine such as the user details each time it is run and transmit it to a remote location or it will open a back door for outsiders by providing easy root access and all the time, you will be impervious about its actions. This is an example of your machine getting rooted.

2006 Year in Review: Hits and Misses

Filed under
Misc

It was a year full of transitions and surprises, and the next year looks likely to bring more of the same. Here's a look at some of eWEEK's most interesting stories from 2006.

Who needs the command line? (Well, actually, we all do)

Filed under
Linux

As you might have guessed this is going to be a brazen and shameless plug for the command line. I write it to throw in my tuppence-worth after my own Linux experiences. I am also concerned about a new generation of users coming to GNU/Linux without a proper understanding of the underlying reasons for its superiority over Windows but this not a blow by blow comparison.

Game of the Day: Snakebite

Filed under
Gaming

Meet Snakebite. Now, you may not have heard of this "Snakebite" game for Linux. That's because it isn't a stand-alone game. Instead, it's a set of custom levels made for the classic game "Rocks n Diamonds". But, as you see from the screenshots, this is nothing like our old friend from Artsoft:

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more