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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 29/01/2013 - 9:20pm
Story Mageia 3 Beta 2 Released srlinuxx 29/01/2013 - 3:08am
Story Introducing LXDE srlinuxx 29/01/2013 - 3:02am
Story GNOME 3: A new perspective srlinuxx 29/01/2013 - 1:37am
Story My Encounter with PicarOS, a Great Linux Distro for Children srlinuxx 29/01/2013 - 1:27am
Story 5 Dilemmas of Linux Evangelists srlinuxx 29/01/2013 - 1:16am
Story Microsoft closes its Times Square store srlinuxx 29/01/2013 - 1:13am
Story Why this Linux user is now using Windows 3.1 srlinuxx 28/01/2013 - 11:57pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 28/01/2013 - 11:54pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 492 srlinuxx 28/01/2013 - 9:31pm

My first impressions of my Dell 1420n with Ubuntu pre-installed.

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica forums: It's obvious it's still Linux and has it's warts. I mean when I first booted it took a bit for the bios to initialize. I don't know what that was about, but took about 30 seconds. Never saw that on my Ibook.

How Linus copes with criticism

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: So, you want to be a kernel hacker. Before you go down that path, or get involved with any other free or open source development project, you should know that it's often a wild, raucous place where -- no matter what level of coding skill you possess -- your tolerance for criticism or rejection might constantly be tested. Even Linus Torvalds isn't immune to criticism.

OpenBSD: Stealing Versus Sharing Code

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: OpenBSD project creator Theo de Raadt detailed his concerns regarding BSD-licensed code and Dual-BSD/GPL-licensed code being re-licensed under only the GPL as previously discussed here, "honestly, I was greatly troubled by the situation, because even people like Alan Cox were giving other Linux developers advice to ... break the law."

KPackage - GUI package administration and management alternative

Filed under
Software

vertito.blogspot: Linux administration of RPM packages from linux boxes is basically required for keeping up and maintaining your package database tight, neat, and clean linux boxes. This has been possible from command line terminal ever since RedHat become well know.

NetBSD and Lighttpd help put three 200 MHz PCs put to good use

Filed under
BSD

pinderkent.blogsavy: I’m a staunch supporter of putting old, but working, computers to good use again. Personally, I have repurposed numerous systems back into production after they were deemed to be too old, and replaced with newer hardware. One of my favourite tools for enabling this is NetBSD.

How To Get Out of the Microsoft Habit

Filed under
Linux

bri-computer.blogspot: If you're like me, a total cheapskate, I believe that you would do well on Ubuntu or PCLinuxOS. Both are very user friendly, and I was blown away by the two Operating Systems.

Avoiding the very appearance of evil at Google

Filed under
Google

matt asay: The Economist has an amazingly good article this week on Google, and its growing influence and power. Rather than ring alarm bells about Google's sometimes casual approach to privacy concerns, the article suggests that Google needs a deeper change of heart.

Gentoo forums scheduled downtime

Filed under
Gentoo
Web

gentoo.org: The database will be shutdown and backed up, final consistency checks will be performed, and pending the unforseen, the conversion to full UTF-8 support is the last step. The forums will be shutdown during this time. This activity is scheduled to start on 2007-09-08.

today's leftover links

Filed under
News
  • 2007 OLF Speakers

  • Nero burns on Linux
  • Motorola's Linux phone arrives at U.S. stores
  • Free x86 Linux router distro rev'd
  • Finally! Upgraded to 7.04 "Feisty"
  • Open source booming in K-12 education
  • Email marketer harnesses the power of Gentoo
  • Two More Linux Games
  • Command line tip - add a user from the command line
  • Finstall: New GUI installer for FreeBSD Operating System
  • Xandros CEO Andreas Typaldos: Getting Along With Redmond
  • Video on the Web: Browser Support

Review: A first look at Puppy Linux 2.17

Filed under
Linux

CLICK: Since my Puppy 2.16 review took so long that 2.17 came out before I finished it, I decided to dive into Puppy 2.17 now so I don't get beat by 2.18 (though I offer no guarantees).

Linux: Killing Tasks On Frozen NFS Mounts

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I've long hated the non-killability of tasks accessing a dead NFS server," Matthew Wilcox said along with a prototype patch to fix the issue based on a 2002 posting by Linus Torvalds.

Novell's Linux Leanings

Filed under
SUSE

Motley Fool: Novell came up aces in its third-quarter report yesterday. The fact that revenues grew means a couple of good things for the software platform designer.

Short-Term/Long-Term: The Battle of OOXML

Filed under
Microsoft

Linux Today: It was, for me, a fascinating study of short-term versus long-term as I watched the proceedings surrounding the standardization process of Microsoft's Open XML document format unfold this week. But then, I am easily fascinated.

Speed up Debian with Xfce (or Fluxbox)

Filed under
Linux

CLICK: I've probably written the following line a hundred times: "The Xfce desktop didn't seem any quicker than GNOME." After running the Xfce-based Xubuntu, Vector and ZenWalk, as well as running Slackware with Xfce, I decided to try it in Debian.

OLPC parts shortage manageable, says maker

Filed under
OLPC

computerworld: The company manufacturing the One Laptop Per Child notebook played down the impact of component shortages, rebutting local reports that the shortages will affect supplies of the computer when it ships in October.

Browser betrayals

Filed under
Software
Security

Tux Love (PC World): Most people don't realise how their browsers betray them. It's not so bad at home, but in a work context it could cost you your job.

Also: FileZilla 3 brings Windows FTP goodness to Linux

Entire city of Vista users can't access the internet

Filed under
Microsoft

the inquirer: PEOPLE in the city of Lund in Sweden that use the Microsoft Vista OS can't connect to the Internet. The reason is because Lund is a Linux city which has a a Linux server that doesn't like Vista.

Microsoft's ISO manipulation will hurt us all

Filed under
Microsoft

jem report: I've always resisted the urge to blindly bash Microsoft -- indeed it does make a few really nice products, and has had a positive impact on the computing world in some important ways. Today I'm writing about something that all computer users need to be aware of, and Microsoft's at the forefront of the effort that goes against user interests.

Also: Microsoft and Its Rivals Take 'Office' Politics Global
And: When the standards are this low, no one wins

Some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux backups powered by Tar

  • Working with GNOME in Fedora 7
  • How to install/use packages in UBUNTU 7.04 DVD?
  • How to use Squid as an easy web filter
  • Ubuntu: Huawei E220 for the sake of Celcom 3G
  • Software audio mixing in Ubuntu
  • Delve deep into drives

Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.22.6 Released

Filed under
Linux

PCBurn: Greg KH and the -stable team have tagged another release of the 2.6.22 stable kernel. 2.6.22.6 fixes PCI, USB, and TCP bugs which will affect most users along with a handful of more specific issues.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more