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About Tux Machines

Monday, 27 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Do I Have Bad Karma for Debian? srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 5:48pm
Story Aaron Seigo: active routes srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 5:46pm
Story Meet the ubuntu (or rather unity) menu; will you call this an innovation? srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 5:44pm
Story GNOME 3: From an end-user’s perspective srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 5:42pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 4:27am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 4:19am
Story A Better Way to Find & Install Windows & Linux Apps srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 2:04am
Story Groklaw Articles Ending on May 16th srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 2:03am
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 170 is out srlinuxx 10/04/2011 - 2:01am
Story How I multitask in Unity srlinuxx 09/04/2011 - 8:09pm

Open Sources Reflections on 2006

Filed under
OSS

As 2006 nears its close, Dave and Matt decided to try to do a "Year in Review" sort of post or two. This has been an exceptional year for open source.

The redesigned Open Addict is now back online!

Filed under
Web

Open Addict v3.0 is now back online, just in time for the Christmas holiday. Millions of Linux and BSD nerds undoubtedly need a place to point their new computers' web browsers and Open Addict v3.0 is back online for their viewing pleasure.

Roadblocks to Switching to Linux

Filed under
Linux

As I sit here plugging away on this XP box I started giving some thought to just what I'd have to do to switch over entirely to Linux. I've tried out Ubuntu on a 2nd machine of mine and I have to tell you that I really like it. It's fast, it looks good, there's plenty of free software modules available for it and it just plain works. So why, you ask haven't I switched my main machine over?

Commercial gaming: Can it thrive on Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

Can a game company make a profit producing commercial offerings for Linux? Two cross-platform offerings that run on Linux are hoping to show that it can be done.

Real-world Apache Derby: Who needs Ajax, anyway?

Filed under
News

Asynchronous JavaScript + XML (Ajax) is a dynamite technique for greatly enhancing the user experience on the Web. Discover how to structure a simple, database-centric solution that provides a mechanism for collecting responses to questions about SOX compliance.

Ubuntu Linux Free Software and Beryl Beat Vista

Filed under
Ubuntu

Linux was founded on the command line. If you look around a little bit and find some of the Linux "old school" guys, you'll find that they tend to shy away from the gui. Linux has really stepped it up a notch visually.

IT in 2006: Google, Linux, Digg, Web-based Apps

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Most of the big tech stories of 2006 have already gotten far too much coverage. Does anyone not know that HP hit a serious bump in the road this year due to its snooping on employees and board members? Other stories – with far more long-term importance – have gotten much less ink.

The Open Source Desktop Myth

Filed under
OSS

Will 2007 be the year of the Free Software desktop? David Chisnall's answer is "probably not, but who cares?" Microsoft won the desktop war; can Free Software win the next one?

Open source to be a driving force in education

Filed under
OSS

Open-source software in schools will be the driving force for Gordon Brown’s proposed ‘Knowledge Economy’, it was claimed today. The claim comes from Bluefountain, after massive cross-party backbench support for a change in government policy for IT in education.

Matt Asay: Drupal founder on Sharepoint (collaboration, not content)

Filed under
Drupal

Dries Buytaert, the founder and maintainer of the excellent web CMS, Drupal, talks today about Sharepoint 2007. He calls it (and its "ilk" of software) "Collaboration Management Software," instead of "Content Management Software." I like that distinction.

Roots access - Genealogy with GRAMPS

Filed under
Software

Genealogy is a burgeoning hobby and to help the home genealogist, a whole range of software is available. Much of it is commercial but here I’ll look at one of the most popular free software options—GRAMPS. Charting your family history needn’t mean compromising on licensing.

Review: VectorLinux 5.8

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

VectorLinux, a lightweight, fast Linux distribution for the x86 platform, just released its new version 5.8 this week. This user-friendly distribution makes the average computer user's life easy by supplying office software, Web browsing, photo editing, and archiving on top of a fast, clean Xfce window manager.

GNOME 2.17.4 Screenshots

Filed under
Software

The GNOME camp has pushed out a new development release in time for the holidays. GNOME 2.17.4 is another test release in the road to GNOME 2.18.0 in March of next year. Many packages were updated from GNOME 2.17.3, so this afternoon we had set out on a GARNOME adventure to capture some new GNOME screenshots to see how GNOME 2.17 is shaping up. Overall it looked quite well except for a few more bugs than normal.

GNOME 2.17.4 Screenshots

Ubuntu Linux 6.06 Christian Edition

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

One of the virtues of Linux is that there's pretty much a version of it for everybody. From regular Ubuntu to Gentoo to Berry Linux to Fedora to Damn Small Linux, there's something out there for virtually all types of Linux users. So I was intrigued to discover that there is a Christian version of the extremely popular Ubuntu Linux distribution.

Linux Desktop 2006: better than ever

Filed under
Linux

I recently read a story that asked, "Has the Desktop Linux Bubble Burst?" Burst!? No, I don't think so. Actually, it still isn't even half as big as it will be when it's full.

Laptops, mobilily and simplicity

Filed under
Linux

A little while ago, I decided that I would never, ever have a desk ever again. I bought a laptop, and after a week I promised I would never, ever buy anything but a laptop and would change my working area in my house. From our latest poll, it's clear that I am not alone. Where does this leave Linux?

Penguins are this winter's hot trend

Filed under
Misc

Forget polar bears. This winter's "it" critter is unquestionably the penguin. America's love affair with penguins stretches from Hollywood to publishing to the Internet.

Today's Howtos

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install KDE Desktop in Ubuntu

  • Webmin Installation and Configuration in Ubuntu Linux
  • Install TrueCrypt on Ubuntu Edgy
  • How to forcefully empty the Trash : Ubuntu
  • Looking Glass for Ubuntu
  • Mount Network File systems (NFS,Samba) in Ubuntu
  • Setting up a server for PXE network booting

Defense Lawyer Attacks DNA Evidence in Hans Reiser Case

Filed under
Reiser

The defense lawyer for Oakland computer programmer Hans Reiser tried to raise doubts today about DNA evidence that prosecutors believe connects him to the death of his wife Nina Reiser, who was last seen alive Sept. 3.

Finding the Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

Linux desktops should receive general market acceptance. But they don't. The reason: The tyranny of the installed base, among other things.

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today's howtos

96Boards SBC showcases Mediatek’s deca-core Helio X20

MediaTek launched the fastest open-spec SBC to date with a 96Boards development board that runs Android on its deca-core Cortex-A53 and -A72 Helio X20 SoC. The “Helio X20 Development Board” is MediaTek’s first 96Boards form-factor single-board computer, and the most powerful open-spec hacker SBC to date. Although we’ve seen some fast 64-bit SoCs among 96Boards SBCs, such as the HiKey, based on an octa-core, Cortex-A53 HiSilicon Kirin 6220, the Helio X20 Development Board offers an even more powerful Helio X20 system-on-chip processor. Read more

Red Hat Financial News

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • New projects, security, and more OpenStack news
  • LibreOffice 5.1.4 Released with Over 130 Fixes
    The first release candidate represented 123 fixes. Some include a fix for a crash in Impress when setting a background image. This occurred with several popular formats in Windows and Linux. Caolán McNamara submitted the patches to fix this in the 5.1 and 5.2 branches. David Tardon fixed a bug where certain presentations hung Impress for extended periods to indefinitely by checking for preconditions earlier. Laurent Balland-Poirier submitted the patches to fix a user-defined cell misinterpretation when using semicolon inside quotes.
  • Open source. Open science. Open Ocean. Oceanography for Everyone and the OpenCTD
    Nearly four years ago, Kersey Sturdivant and I launched a bold, ambitious, and, frankly, naive crowdfunding initiative to build the first low-cost, open-source CTD, a core scientific instrument that measures salinity, temperature, and depth in a water column. It was a dream born from the frustration of declining science funding, the expense of scientific equipment, and the promise of the Maker movement. After thousands of hours spent learning the skills necessary to build these devices, hundreds of conversations with experts, collaborators, and potential users around the world, dozens of iterations (some transformed into full prototypes, others that exist solely as software), and one research cruise on Lake Superior to test the housing and depth and temperature probes, the OpenCTD has arrived.
  • RuuviTag Open-Source Bluetooth Internet Of Things Sensor Beacon Hits Kickstarter (video)
  • Retro gaming on open source 2048 console
    Retro gaming in the open source vein could be on the upswing this season. Creoqode is the London-based technology design company behind 2048, the DIY game console with retro-style video games and visuals that is also supposed to help users learn coding.