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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 25 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story ‘Ubuntu TV’ to be Revealed at CES srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 10:39pm
Story Many Eyes, Many Heads srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 10:36pm
Story GKrellM on GNOME 3 openSUSE 12.1 srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 6:59pm
Story Answering a tricky question with the KStars desktop planetarium package srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 6:55pm
Story Is Mandriva Finished This Time? srlinuxx 7 07/01/2012 - 11:21am
Story 2012: The Year of Ubuntu srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 8:54am
Story OpenSUSE May Finally Pull In Plymouth srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 7:31am
Story Can Mozilla Unify Open Source? srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 7:27am
Story OLPC XO-3 Tablet To Be Shown At CES srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 7:24am
Story From Zero to Drupal in 30 Minutes srlinuxx 07/01/2012 - 5:07am

Novell joins EFF for patent reform

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CNet: Facing criticism for its patent pact with Microsoft, Novell on Wednesday said it's supporting the Electronic Frontier Foundation's effort to challenge what it believes are bogus patents.

Jokosher 0.9 released

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Jono Bacon: Jokosher 0.9 is out! Go and download it! If you are running Ubuntu it is as simple as installing two packages. Even easier on Gutsy, it is available in the repositories.

Tone-mapping HDR photos with Qtpfsgui

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HowTos A lot of photos tagged with "HDR" turn up on Flickr and similar photo sharing sites these days. They're unnatural, surreal, sometimes crazy-looking images with the bright areas darkened, the dark areas brightened, and lots of saturation. You can get in on the craze under Linux using Qtpfsgui.

Linux users often have a very skewed opinion on what “easy” is

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Thursday Night: While wasting time on teh Intarnets today, I came across this article on Linux Mint, an “improved” version of Ubuntu. However, the author of the article says, "Linux Mint comes preinstalled with is mintDisk that allows easy mounting of various partitions." This dialog is by no means “easy”.

What is the Ubuntu W2L edition about?

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opensourcelearning: We are working on a book about Ubuntu Linux that aims at Windows users who want to migrate to Linux or are considering it. The book is a step-by-step migration guide, but also want to provide a wide overview of what Linux has to offer.

More Fun With Printing

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linux devcenter blogs (Carla Schroder): Printing on any platform is part voodoo, part high blood pressure and hair loss, and part yay-it-works-it-works! Printing in Linux gets better all the time, especially when you find the right drivers.

We're all Linux users

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DesktopLinux: Ever since I wrote "Why people really don't switch to Linux," I've been getting email and forum messages about why I'm right or why I'm wrong. One thing I didn't mention, though, was that really, in 2007, we're all already Linux users.

Share files with friends while chatting using Qnext

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Software Two of the most popular open source instant messaging clients, Pidgin (formerly Gaim) and Kopete, can work with multiple protocols, but neither is a great option when it comes to sharing files with friends. For that, try Qnext.

X.Org-ATI driver news

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liquidat: In a recent blog entry the developer airlied gave an update about the current development state of the X.Org drivers for ATI cards. After the next vesion 6.7 randr-1.2 support will be integrated.

Three more things that the Linux community doesn’t get

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ZDNet Blogs: The response to the Five crucial things the Linux community doesn’t understand about the average computer user post I made the other day was, well overwhelming. After wading through some of the comments I’ve realized that I missed three more points about regular PC users that some in the Linux community just don’t get.

How to use Thunar Bulk Rename

Raiden's Realm: Everyone at some point in their life has found themselves in need of renaming a lot of files in the quickest and simplest way possible. Originally designed for the XFCE window manager, Thunar Bulk Renamer (aka Bulk Rename) also works well under other window managers such as KDE and Gnome.

The Road to KDE 4: Konsole Gets an Overhaul

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KDE Konsole has been a staple of KDE since KDE 2.0, as has been showing signs of a little bit of clutter and wear. So, Robert Knight has stepped in to clean up the program's code, and more than anything else, fix a cluttered and difficult interface.

Dell's Ubuntu Offering Shows Why Linux Is Its Own Worst Enemy

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InformationWeek: Unfortunately, we're seeing in action why Linux, which is the best operating system money can buy--because it's free--is also its own worst enemy. The big problem is that the availability of Linux drivers, though nowhere near the crisis levels it was several years ago, is still spotty.

How to set up a dual-boot or multi-boot with *Ubuntu using Lubi

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suseforums: Ever wanted to test the new K/X/Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty, but don't have a spare partition, and don't want to jeopardize your production environment by resizing partitions, dist-updating, or tinkering with its bootloader? Now you can leave your existing Linux distro untouched, while being able to use Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty in a full-fledged install on a loopmounted partition, no partitioning required!

Linux: Files as Directories

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kernelTRAP: Miklos Szeredi posted a patch to allow files to be accessed as directories, offering the example of accessing the contents of a compressed tarball as you would any other directory. He noted that this is not the only application of the patch, "others might suggest accessing streams, resource forks or extended attributes through such an interface."

Also: Kernel space: a new filesystem for flash devices

BASH shell scripting tip: Set default values for variable

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nixcraft: A shell variable may be assigned to by a statement using following syntax:
var=value If value is not given, the variable is assigned the null string. In shell program it is quite useful to provide default value for variables.

New PCLinuxOS 2007 looks great, works well

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Reviews PCLinuxOS is a live CD distribution that enables users to test Linux without actually having to install it. The highly anticipated new version, PCLinuxOS 2007, was released on Monday. Its intuitive selection of software, high level of stability and functionality, and the quality of the graphics make this the distribution's best release ever.

Switching Desktops on Ubuntu

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PC World: Here's how to test-drive the 'Big Three' desktop environments on Ubuntu Linux and switch among them at will.

OS Imitation: The Sincerest Form of Flattery

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OSWeekly: One of the amusing things about people who use operating systems is that even though some of them may confidently claim that the platform they use is better than the competition, there are probably still going to be times when they covet a feature that another OS has.

Mozilla Seeks Executive Director

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MozillaZine Blogs: The Mozilla Foundation is seeking an Executive Director. If you know anyone you think would be a good candidate, please contact Eunice Azzani at Eunice [dot] Azzani [at] kornferry [dot] com.

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More in Tux Machines

Rackspace and FOSS Report

  • The Rackspace State of Open Source
    As the OpenStack Summit in Barcelona kicks off, Rackspace has released a report entitled ‘The State of Open Source’. With every conference seemingly extolling the virtues of open source software, this report is timely. It manages to differentiate between enterprise open source and the wider open source software market.
  • Why digital transformation needs open source
    As if there wasn't already ample reason for businesses to switch to open source, Forrester analysts Paul Miller and Lauren E Nelson released a report in April 2016, entitled Open Source Powers Enterprise Digital Transformation — CIOs Need To Embrace Open Source Software To Drive Change, which further drives the point.
  • Despite Security Fears, Open Source Is Fuelling Innovation and Cost Savings in UK Businesses
  • Security concerns fail to hold back UK open source success
    However, despite its increasingly common use, many (54%) still perceive external security threats to be a big barrier to adoption, that’s according to a report published by Rackspace. The State of Open Source study, which was conducted among IT decision makers in UK businesses with over 1,000 employees and revenues over £500m, and looks at the ways open source is being used, its benefits, but also what is holding back adoption and business concerns. According to the report open source has come of age with 85% using open source technology to migrate a closed source project to open source. Open source also isn’t just a tool for small businesses; the vast majority (90%) of large businesses are now deploying open source-based enterprise applications, with 25% being completely open source. The reason for the growing adoption is because of the money and time savings. Rackspace found that for each project that had been migrated to open source technology, six out of ten organisations saved on average £30,146 and reduced project lifecycle by six months. Greater innovation was reported by many (49%), and 46% were driven to open source because of the competitive opportunities. Additionally, just under half (45%) said that it enabled them to get products and services to market faster. John Engates, Chief Technology Officer at Rackspace, said: “While open source technologies have been around for many years, it is great to see that enterprise businesses are finally dipping their toes in and seeing the tangible benefits.

FOSS and Blockchain

Security Leftovers

  • The internet apocalypse map hides the major vulnerability that created it
    During Friday’s massive distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on DNS service provider Dyn, one might be forgiven for mistaking the maps of network outages for images of some post-apocalyptic nuclear fallout. Screenshots from sites like showed menacingly red, fuzzy heat maps of, well, effectively just population centers of the United States experiencing serious difficulty accessing Twitter, Github, Etsy, or any of Dyn's other high-profile clients. Aside from offering little detail and making a DDoS literally into a glowing red menace, they also obscured the reality of just how centralized a lot of internet infrastructure really is. DNS is ground zero for the uneasy tension of the internet’s presumed decentralized resilience and the reality that as of now, translating IP addresses into domain names requires some kind of centralized, hierarchical platform, and that’s probably not going to radically change anytime soon. Other maps provided by various business to business network infrastructure companies weren’t much more helpful. These maps seem to exist mostly to signal that the companies in question have lots of cool data and that it can be made into a flashy map — which might impress potential customers, but that doesn’t offer a ton of insights for the layperson. For example, threat intelligence company Norse's map appears to be mostly a homage to the Matthew Broderick movie War Games: a constant barrage of DDoS attacks beaming like space invader rockets across a world map. Akamai has an impressive 3D visualization that renders traffic as points beaming into the atmosphere. And website monitoring service Pingdom offers a dot map at such a far-out zoom level that it's essentially useless for seeking out more meaningful patterns than "outages happen in population centers, also there are a lot of outages."
  • CoreOS Patched Against the "Dirty COW" Linux Kernel Vulnerability, Update Now
  • World’s first hack-proof router launched
    Turris Omnia router, tagged the world’s first hack-proof router, was launched yesterday at the CES Unveiled Show in Prague, Czech Republic. As an essential part of any home internet network, routers are rather poorly secured and protected against cyber attack. More often than not, the only security feature is the default password. With easily required internet knowledge and some skills, these routers can be hacked, providing unauthorized access to a complete internet network. From there on, anything is possible.

ARM/FPGA module runs Linux on Arria 10 SoC

iWave’s rugged, Linux-friendly, 95 x 75mm “Arria 10 SoC Module” expands upon the dual-core, ARM/FPGA SoC from Altera with DDR4 and 24 transceivers. The iWave Systems Arria 10 SoC Module builds upon Intel/Altera’s Arria 10 SX SoC, a faster, newer sibling to the Cyclone V SX, which iWave tapped for its Qseven based iW-RainboW-G17M-Q7 COM and iW-RainboW-G17D development board combo. Both the Cyclone V SoC and Arria 10 SoC combine dual-core Cortex-A9 subsystems with FPGA circuitry, but the Arria 10 boosts the ARM clock speed to 1.5GHz, up from 800MHz, and offers a higher end FPGA. Read more