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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story KDE Font Oxygen ‘Fit for Testing’ srlinuxx 16/01/2012 - 7:04pm
Story Has Firefox Lost Its Edge? srlinuxx 16/01/2012 - 7:01pm
Story Ubuntu — Traitors of Linux, Open Source Software and The Community srlinuxx 5 16/01/2012 - 6:39am
Story Three Spins You May Not Have Heard Of srlinuxx 15/01/2012 - 10:36pm
Story My Unity 5.0 Experience srlinuxx 15/01/2012 - 10:32pm
Story Following the unique way of Trisquel srlinuxx 15/01/2012 - 10:21pm
Story Interview with Quackers srlinuxx 15/01/2012 - 9:10pm
Story Btrfs Picks Up Snappy Compression Support srlinuxx 15/01/2012 - 9:08pm
Story PC-BSD 9.0 released srlinuxx 15/01/2012 - 9:06pm
Story Microsoft confirms UEFI fears, locks down ARM devices srlinuxx 2 15/01/2012 - 8:14am

Launch your programs faster with Katapult

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Free Software Mag Blogs: One of the biggest navigational issues with any operating system is using program menus. It is hard to find programs (and what if you look for Thunderbird in Office, and then realize it is under Internet?). KDE users have the great, free-as-in-speech, Katapult.

Beyond the Browser

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O'Reilly Radar: Looking ahead to the next few years, one of the critical steps to making Linux a complete drop-in replacement for proprietary operating systems is filling in the last few missing desktop productivity applications: calendaring, contact management, project management tools, PDA/cell phone/laptop synchronization, etc.

KDE Commit-Digest for 27th May 2007

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In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Continued work in Plasma, particularly in the clock visualisations. Kalzium uses the GetHotNewStuff framework to download new molecules for its 3d viewer, plus speed optimisations for the rendering of these molecules. The start of fullscreen support in the Gwenview image viewer.

Book review: Beginning Ubuntu Linux

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FreeSoftware Mag: I picked up Beginning Ubuntu Linux, Second Edition with a sense of familiarity; I also had the pleasure of reviewing the First Edition and found the experience to be a gentle and very complete introduction to Ubuntu.

Firefox Takes 25% of Browser Market

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Moz/FF According to the latest statistics from, Firefox’s market share is going gangbusters with the open source browser capturing over 25 percent of the browser market.

PCLinuxOS 2007 vs openSUSE 10.2 vs Windows XP Boot-up/Shut-down Times

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Tryst with Linux: The moment you regularly jump distributions, the boot-up (and subsequently shut-down) timings become an issue. And I thought it would be interesting to compare the three operating systems from a ‘timing’ perspective.

KDE to be at Linuxtag 2007

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KDE This year Germany's LinuxTag conference and exhibition takes place in in Berlin's Messe for the first time. As with previous years there will be a KDE booth, where you can meet some of the people behind KDE.

The Terminator -- "ps" and "kill"

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What can you do when processes wear out their welcome and stick around longer than you would like them to? This article introduces the commands ps and kill.

Also: Command line tip - find out which version of a program will run

Can't libc Do It?

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linux devcenter: I have a little PIR program that prints “Hello, world!”. I use it for valgrinding Parrot. Profiling Parrot’s startup and shutdown time seemed useful. When you do this, run callgrind annnotate on the resulting output file to get a nice report of which functions did the most work. Here’s what happened when I dug into the code.

Linux, Still not there yet

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Al Suttons Blog: I’ve finally made the choice between OpenSuSE or Vista as my preferred OS for the next few years, and the decision went to Vista, and to my surprise it only took a couple of hours to decide.

Also: I like Microsoft!

ATI Drivers: Ubuntu vs. Windows

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Phoronix: NVIDIA's Linux and Windows drivers perform about the same and in some instances the Linux binary driver even running faster, but as we have been sharing now for many months the Linux fglrx driver is handicapped for performance. Has things since improved for ATI?

The KDE 3.5 Control Center - Part 9 - Sound & Multimedia

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The Sound & Multimedia section covers four basic areas of the KDE multimedia system that are important to your daily use of KDE from a multimedia perspective. As much as we may or may not realize it, we rely on a lot of multimedia interaction with our computers every day. Be it music, video or something else, it's all very important to us and without it, our experience wouldn't be the same. So lets look at each of the four subsections in this section and how each one is important to your daily user experience.

Firefox extension lets you remove elements from Web pages

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Moz/FF Are you irritated by huge graphical ads smack in the middle of an article? Or maybe you don't want to waste bandwidth viewing the dozens of images in a review, or user icons in forum boards? You can remove them for good with a single click by using Firefox's RIP extension, which zaps anything out of a Web page, permanently.

Why Microsoft Will Not Sue Linux Patent Violators

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OSWeekly: Every place you look, someone is going on and on about how Microsoft is planning to litigate everyone who has violated their patents. Well, today I‘m going to explain why I don't believe Microsoft will even bother with it, what they ought to do if they were smart and why we have nothing to worry about.

Small Builders Feel The Software Love

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CRN: Custom systems builders may not get the same amount of attention and other perks that name-brand OEMs get from software vendors like Microsoft and Novell. But those vendors say they recognize the importance of systems builders and are taking steps to recruit and retain them.

Macintosh…Help me understand why

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ZDNet: I can feel them…the flames…they’re coming. But I have to ask this question again (yes, I’ve asked one very much like it before) in light of recent events. The recent events, of course, involve the release of a particular Linux distribution with a funny African sort of name and, maybe more significantly, the first tier-one vendor’s adoption of said funny-sounding distro as an OS choice.

GPLv3 threatens Microsoft-Novell pact?

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ZDNet: While much of what was (officially) released is known, Novell did express concerns that the final version of the General Public License (GPLv3) -- which slipped its March 2007 deadline -- could see Microsoft halting the distribution of SUSE Linux, which would impact financially on Novell.

HIG Hunting Season in its 3rd Week

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KDE Are you fed up with cryptic error messages you don't understand? Then get involved! This week's target of the HIG Hunting Season is warnings and error messages.

Make Wine and PulseAudio get along

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Thursday Night: I got a Joost invite the other day, and I tried to get the client program working with Wine, the Linux implementation of the Win32 API. Sadly, it was a no-go; I couldn’t get it to work without skipping. However, it’s not all lost.

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Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.