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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Getting started with the CentOS 4.4 Single Server CD

Filed under
Linux

Recently I needed to set up a server with all the usual server components -- Web, mail, and file sharing. It needed to be rock-solid and reliable. I didn't want to download 4GB of software from the Net, so I turned to CentOS' Single Server CD.

Unlock the Power of VIM

Filed under
Software

vi editor is something that UNIX newbies often like to criticize. Until they learn it well and understand why vi is vi and not something else.It is a marvellous creation of Bill Joy and one cannot but think of it without a feeling of magic and spookiness.

A New Year, A New Kwort

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

It was just about a year ago that I first tested slackware-based Kwort Linux. At that time I was impressed with its customized appearance and exclusive kpkg.

Howto: Compile MaCoPiX 1.4.1 under Edgy

Filed under
HowTos

First, an additional thank-you to Cake en Soda for pointing this out. This is a fun, low-level eye candy application that shouldn’t tax your system too much, and will give you something funky to show off to your Windows friends. And if you’re an anime fan, you’ll go nuts over it.

MaCoPiX puts a small animated character on your window frames.

Four weeks with Ubuntu Linux on the desktop, Part 3

Filed under
Ubuntu

n January 30th I installed Ubuntu Linux and decided to give it a serious try. I’ve heard that installing software on Linux is very difficult. That may have been true once but it is a myth today. The truth is, installing software in Ubuntu is a far better and easier process that it has ever been in Windows.

Firefox 2.0.0.3 Officially Released

Filed under
Moz/FF

As part of Mozilla Corporation's ongoing stability and security update process, Firefox 1.5.0.11 and Firefox 2.0.0.3 are now available for Windows, Mac, and Linux for free download from http://getfirefox.com.

Due to the security fixes, we strongly recommend that all Firefox users upgrade to these latest releases.

Pioneer Basic Release 2 -- How much horse power is in this Linux from Colorado?

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

I am always getting suggestions on what the next Distro we should be reviewing. Many tell me to do the majors, such as Gentoo or Debian. While I agree that many people would like to see these, most newbies to Linux really should stay away from these in my humble opinion.

Taking over the world, one GNU/Linux PC at a time

Filed under
Linux

This is the promised followup to the recent article which basically establishes significant flaws in execution of the World Domination 201 plan which by all means seems to have started. The flaws are in the nature of the business model employed by the company who is apparently supposed to play a crucial role in this plan, Linspire.

Jono Bacon: Connected diversity

Filed under
Ubuntu

What was particularly interesting (apart from the the fact that most of the people who didn’t use Ubuntu used Gentoo) was how Ubuntu, and as such Linux and free software, is becoming part and parcel of peoples lives.

Why suspend-to-RAM will never work perfectly on Linux

Filed under
Software

When Apple introduced “sleep” especially on its laptops, it raised the bar in the industry because people loved the feature. The feature existed before but Apple really made it one of the reasons why someone would want a Mac laptop.

Living (and dying) with Linux in the workplace

Filed under
SUSE

Are you looking for a Windows alternative for serious office work? Many people are starting to wonder about their non-Microsoft operating system options, especially given Windows Vista's hefty hardware demands, upgrade costs and license restrictions. Scot Finnie, Computerworld's online editorial director, has already examined using Mac OS X in the workplace.

How To Get Better ATI Linux Support

Filed under
Software

This morning I came across a blog entry by Jonathan Steffan, who is working on new Fedora XGL packages. In this blog post he expresses disappointment in owning ATI hardware and bashes the binary blob for the lack of AIGLX support.

GNOME Foundation Retains Software Freedom Law Center

Filed under
Legal

The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC), provider of pro-bono legal services to protect and advance Free and Open Source Software, has added the GNOME Foundation as a new client.

Larry Ellison: Oracle replaced Red Hat support at Yahoo

Filed under
Linux

Oracle CEO Larry Ellison was spreading the love for his competitors on the company's third quarter conference call.

Notably, Ellison said Oracle replaced Red Hat for Linux support at Yahoo.

Novell Receives Additional NASDAQ Notice

Filed under
SUSE

Novell today announced that, as expected, it received an additional notice of non-compliance from the staff of the NASDAQ Stock Market due to the delay in filing its quarterly report on Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended Jan. 31, 2007, as required by NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 4310(c)(14).

Google Earth on SLED 10: Google Earth the way it was meant to be

Filed under
Software

In an earlier post I unfairly trashed Google Earth. The problem, as I've just discovered, more than likely rests with my graphics hardware platform, not Google Earth. While I was working with SLED 10 this morning I pulled down another copy of Google Earth and installed it on SLED.

You’ve heard of KDE? How about an MDE (hint: M=Mozilla)

Filed under
Moz/FF

How to create video titles and graphics with Kino

Filed under
HowTos

Kino is one of the better free software video editors for Linux, but it isn't always intuitive. Consider such common tasks as adding titles and graphics to a clip. The best approach isn't obvious. After a little exploring, I figured out good ways to add titles and graphics.

Learning GIMP - Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

Are we learning GIMP yet?

Creative Live! Cam Optia USB Webcam Review

Filed under
Hardware

Inexpensive and driverless - two words that any computer user can appreciate, especially after having gone through a few upgrades that caused problems of their own. As a basic VGA webcam without a microphone that adheres to the relatively new USB Video Class specification, Creative's Live! Cam Optia fills such a void. Are these enticements worth the hassle? Read on to find out.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box