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Friday, 24 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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using curl to access ftp servers

Filed under
HowTos

linux by example: The title doesn’t sound interesting if you have no idea what is curl. Why we need to use curl to access ftp server, if we can access ftp with tools like ftp in console or gFTP?

An Agnostic Objectively Reviews Ubuntu Christian Edition 3.3

Filed under
Ubuntu

fsckin.com: I’ve been wanting to review Ubuntu Christian Edition (CE) 3.3 with intentions of giving it a good review. After all, it is Ubuntu, with a little Praise Jesus on the side. I enjoy using Ubuntu, and if someone can put some Jesus in an operating system and I like it, surely it’s an operating system that is worth using.

Clean up your Ubuntu with deborphan

Filed under
HowTos

linuxscrew.com: If you want to clean up your Ubuntu or Debian machine and delete unnecessary (orphaned) deb packages you can use utility deborphan. It finds packages that have no packages depending on them.

RandR 1.3 and other future X.Org development

Filed under
Software

liquidat: A month ago the X Developer Summit took place. Now notes about most of the talks are available and show where X development heads to. Among the information are a feature list for RandR 1.3, for the Intel driver and for X.Org 7.4/7.5.

Extending Nautilus: rotating JPG images

Filed under
Software
HowTos

freesoftware mag: I recently went looking for a way to rotate JPG images from within Nautilus, and found a nice way to do this and more. It’s not difficult to customize the right-click popup menu in Nautilus to perform custom actions on files. Here are some instructions and scripts to get you started.

Some openSUSE 10.3 stuff

Filed under
SUSE
  • Some openSUSE 10.3 Hints

  • OpenSUSE 10.3 And Ralink RT2×00 Based Wireless Cards
  • 1-click to install NVIDIA/ATI binary blobs
  • Novell Pumps Up Sound, Graphics in New OpenSuse 10.3
  • openSUSE 10.3: First Look

Today's Leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Compiler Optimization Bugs and World Domination

  • Checkpatch and Checkfiles
  • Smack Updates
  • USB Simply MEPIS install
  • Continued Impressions of Kubuntu 7.10 beta
  • Slashdot: Building success from personal preferences and community conscience
  • Laptop With a Mission Widens Its Audience
  • Linux-based airline seat-back entertainment system is a winner
  • Earth- or Mars-like body likely forming in HD 113766 star system
  • Vista redux: the Linux edition
  • How to add a user to the sudoers list
  • openSUSE 10.3 on PS3 and Other PowerPC Hardware

Quake Wars Linux Update

Filed under
Gaming

ve3d.ign.com: There's been a ton of interest from the Linux Community, so I wanted to give you all a status update on development.

5 Ways to Customize your Ubuntu Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu

onderstekop.nl: Changing your wallpaper now and again may keep your mind fresh, but did you ever have the feeling that you wanted to change more? But what exactly? And how? This article was written to give you some perceptions into further personalization of your overall Ubuntu appearance.

David Bienvenu leaving Mozilla. Thunderbird in trouble?

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla links: David Bienvenu, the other only full time Thunderbird developer has also announced he will be leaving the Mozilla Corporation next Friday.

Ubuntu - Archive frozen for Gutsy release

Filed under
Ubuntu

lunapark: Ubuntu’s Gutsy Gibbon is coming along splendidly and today Gutsy has hit one more milestone until its release (Oct. 18th). The Ubuntu developers has announced a complete freeze of their archive and from now on only uploads “fixing specfic, release-releavent bugs” will be accepted.

Radeon Driver coverage at Phoronix

Filed under
Software
  • Open-Source Radeon R700 Graphics?

  • Avivo Driver Supports Radeon HD 2300
  • Open-Source RadeonHD Cursor Fixes
  • ATI Radeon 6.7.195 Driver Release

Ubuntu pride--on the basketball court

Filed under
OS

c|net: The Eastern Conference of the National Basketball Association and the Linux community now have more in common than you might have thought. Via The Boston Herald, Linux fans may want to throw their support to Gang Green because of the team's new rallying cry, "ubuntu."

Open Source Phishing: A Call To Arms

Filed under
Software
Security

blogs.techrepublic.com: Recently consumer auction giant eBay announced that nearly 1,200 registered eBay users information was stolen via phishing attacks. That’s not shocking. What’s shocking is that it’s very likely the phishers were using rootkitted Linux boxes.

If I Were in Charge of...

Filed under
Linux

Linux Today: I was taking a walk with my wife the other day, talking about all the kooky-nuttiness that is the Linux and Open Source world sometimes. I think I was harping on a certain company in Washington State and their recent "attempts" to "open source" some of their code.

I have just been blown away by Linux....Again!!!!

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox blogs: Here I was happily fiddling around with my Kubuntu installation and at a critical time when the initrd image was being regenerated our fabled standard of stable electricity supply decided to cut out. Not surprising as it does that every time a mosquito sneezes.

What is Compiz?

Filed under
Software

linuxmini.blogspot: Compiz is a window manager, that means it takes care of all the basic needs to interact with the windows on your desktop - like moving, minimizing and resizing.

de Icaza: .NET source code release a non-event for open source world

Filed under
Microsoft

zdnet blogs: Microsoft’s release of .NET classes under its shared source license will not benefit the Mono project or any other open source project, maintains Miguel de Icaza, Novell’s vice president of engineering.

Is TransGaming dumping Linux in favor of Apple?

Filed under
Software

jem report: Almost two weeks ago, Blizzard Entertainment pushed through a required World of Warcraft patch that made the game unplayable for many Linux users, reducing frame rates to unacceptable levels, causing distorted sound, and making the OpenGL graphics engine more difficult to switch to. Considering TransGaming's history of rapidly addressing WoW patch issues, this is unusual behavior. Couple that with total silence from the company and you have a genuine mystery on your hands. What's going on at TransGaming?

The best Linux system repair distribution gets better

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: If there's a better system repair kit than the Gentoo-based SystemRescueCD Linux distribution, we haven't seen it yet. The new 0.4 version of SystemRescueCd was released on Oct. 4. This new edition focuses on disk partitioning, Vista support, and data rescue tasks. In the past, we've found SystemRescueCD to be the best of the best when it comes to repairing troubled systems.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • LinuXatUSIL – Previas 2 for #LinuxPlaya
    Damian from GNOME Argentina explained us some code based on this tutorial and the widgets in Glade were presented.
  • RancherOS v0.8.0 released! [Ed: and a bugfix release, 0.8.1, out today]
    RancherOS v0.8.0 is now available! This release has taken a bit more time than prior versions, as we’ve been laying more groundwork to allow us to do much faster updates, and to release more often.
  • The Technicals For Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) Tell An Interesting Tale
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Released | New Features And Download
    Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus Beta 1 release is finally here. If you’re interested, you can go ahead and download the ISO images of the participating flavors, which are, Lubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Ubuntu Budgie, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio. Powered by Linux kernel 4.10, these releases feature the latest stable versions of their respective desktop environments. This release will be followed by the Final Beta release on March 23 and final release on April 13.
  • Ubuntu 17.04 Beta 1 Now Available to Download
    The first beta releases in the Ubuntu 17.04 development cycle are ready for testing, with Xubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME and Ubuntu Budgie among the flavors taking part.

FOSS Policies

Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

  • Stop using SHA1 encryption: It’s now completely unsafe, Google proves
    Security researchers have achieved the first real-world collision attack against the SHA-1 hash function, producing two different PDF files with the same SHA-1 signature. This shows that the algorithm's use for security-sensitive functions should be discontinued as soon as possible. SHA-1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) dates back to 1995 and has been known to be vulnerable to theoretical attacks since 2005. The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has banned the use of SHA-1 by U.S. federal agencies since 2010, and digital certificate authorities have not been allowed to issue SHA-1-signed certificates since Jan. 1, 2016, although some exemptions have been made. However, despite these efforts to phase out the use of SHA-1 in some areas, the algorithm is still fairly widely used to validate credit card transactions, electronic documents, email PGP/GPG signatures, open-source software repositories, backups and software updates.
  • on pgp
    First and foremost I have to pay respect to PGP, it was an important weapon in the first cryptowar. It has helped many whistleblowers and dissidents. It is software with quite interesting history, if all the cryptograms could tell... PGP is also deeply misunderstood, it is a highly successful political tool. It was essential in getting crypto out to the people. In my view PGP is not dead, it's just old and misunderstood and needs to be retired in honor. However the world has changed from the internet happy times of the '90s, from a passive adversary to many active ones - with cheap commercially available malware as turn-key-solutions, intrusive apps, malware, NSLs, gag orders, etc.
  • Cloudflare’s Cloudbleed is the worst privacy leak in recent Internet history
    Cloudflare revealed today that, for months, all of its protected websites were potentially leaking private information across the Internet. Specifically, Cloudflare’s reverse proxies were dumping uninitialized memory; that is to say, bleeding private data. The issue, termed Cloudbleed by some (but not its discoverer Tavis Ormandy of Google Project Zero), is the greatest privacy leak of 2017 and the year has just started. For months, since 2016-09-22 by their own admission, CloudFlare has been leaking private information through Cloudbleed. Basically, random data from random sites (again, it’s worth mentioning that every site that used CloudFlare in the last half year should be considered to having fallen victim to this) would be randomly distributed across the open Internet, and then indefinitely cached along the way.
  • Serious Cloudflare bug exposed a potpourri of secret customer data
    Cloudflare, a service that helps optimize the security and performance of more than 5.5 million websites, warned customers today that a recently fixed software bug exposed a range of sensitive information that could have included passwords and cookies and tokens used to authenticate users. A combination of factors made the bug particularly severe. First, the leakage may have been active since September 22, nearly five months before it was discovered, although the greatest period of impact was from February 13 and February 18. Second, some of the highly sensitive data that was leaked was cached by Google and other search engines. The result was that for the entire time the bug was active, hackers had the ability to access the data in real-time by making Web requests to affected websites and to access some of the leaked data later by crafting queries on search engines. "The bug was serious because the leaked memory could contain private information and because it had been cached by search engines," Cloudflare CTO John Graham-Cumming wrote in a blog post published Thursday. "We are disclosing this problem now as we are satisfied that search engine caches have now been cleared of sensitive information. We have also not discovered any evidence of malicious exploits of the bug or other reports of its existence."