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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Debfoster: Remove a package and its dependencies

Filed under
Software

DPotD: Debfoster exists to tell you which packages are installed on your machine merely as dependencies for other packages. It then gives you the option of removing the package and its dependencies. Debfoster is most useful to keep your system very lean.

RHEL / CentOS Support 4GB or more RAM ( memory )

Filed under
HowTos

nixcraft: If you have 4 GB or more RAM use the Linux kernel compiled for PAE capable machines. Your machine may not show up total 4GB ram. All you have to do is install PAE kernel package.

Too many free operating systems? I don't think so.

Filed under
Linux

nuxified.org/blog: Some people say that there are too many GNU/Linux distributions, too many people just doing their own instead of joining an existing effort. Why would we want to do that when we already have a cathedral, the one we escaped from?

Why is there no Open Source SLES ?

Filed under
SUSE

dag.wieers.com/blog: "Why is there no SLES alternative distribution ?". Given all the benefits a free Enterprise Linux brings to Red Hat, Novell must be eager to want to tap into this resource, right ?

Fedora 8 Review

Filed under
Linux

dvd-guides.com: A new release of Redhat-sponsored Fedora is always in the headlines of the Linux world as it is one of those distributions that push Linux forward by introducing exciting new features. I have used Fedora 7 for about 4 months myself until I moved over to Arch Linux so in this review I will try to point out what has been improved other the older versions.

OpenDocument and Qt fonts goodness

Filed under
Software

trolltech.com/blogs: My favorite OpenDocument Format implementation KOffice is based on Qt and version two will be released after Qt4.4 is out as 4.4 is going to bring a lot of improvements for it. I’m working through some of the features that we see in ODF which are pretty advanced nice little things.

Debian-eeepc: the little next big thing

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blog.thedebianuser.org: Now it’s finally official: the Asus EeePC (for Easy to Learn, Work, and Play) will be available from December in Germany and Austria for a recommended end user price of €299,- including tax.

101 uses for a dead distro

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I’ve been spending a rather inordinate amount of time trying to get the ugly little laptop working with the corpse of Lowarch. I know, it’s a lost cause, but it’s not without some success.

A new look at fonts in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntu-assist.com: I’ve been playing around with fonts in Gutsy recently, so I thought I would document on this blog.

More Monitoring Software for Ubuntu

Filed under
Software

itbusinessedge.com/blogs: Hyperic isn’t the only open source company hoping to capitalize on Ubuntu’s push for a bigger piece of the OS market, it seems. Thursday, GroundWork Open Source released GroundWork Monitor Open Source for Ubuntu and other Debian-based operating systems.

Entropy: 0.7.5 milestone

Filed under
Software

sabayonlinux.org: Last night I committed Entropy/Equo 0.7.5. Why is it a milestone? Because it is starting to bring something that no other package managers have: It’s possible to create a compressed package that self-contains the choosen application and all its dependencies. Just unpack it and double click on the executables.

Slowly Making Friends With The New Gimp

Filed under
Software

penguin pete: What's driving me to put Gimp 2.4 on my Slackware box (my main office) is that I can never again do a Gimp tutorial until I am set up with 2.4. The interface overhaul is just too massive; every Gimp tutorial currently published in print or the web has now become worthless.

A tale of four distributions

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe: With the final release of Fedora 8 last Thursday, I decided to perform a simple experiment with four distributions. I'd boot them on my two Gateway notebooks. The four distributions I tried were Fedora 8, Ubuntu 7.10, openSUSE 10.3, and Indiana (Open Solaris) Developer Preview.

Egosoft's X3: Reunion For Linux

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix: Last week we mentioned that X3: Reunion for Linux was going forward with beta testing, which is going on ten months after Linux Game Publishing originally announced they would be porting this X2 - The Threat sequel (the original announcement). Well, those fortunate to have closed-beta access privileges at Linux Game Publishing were finally greeted with the X3: Reunion Linux binary yesterday.

Also: Nouveau Companion 30

The day of the Linux desktop

Filed under
Linux

Robin 'Roblimo' Miller: I've been hearing the phrase "This is the year of the Linux desktop" for 10 years. For me, it's been a true statement for each of those years, because GNU/Linux has been my primary desktop operating system since 1997. But for most people around the world, this is the year of the the Windows desktop, same as it was last year and the year before. But if we each spent one day telling others about GNU/Linux, could we make a difference in the lives of at least a few people?

Can we afford not to give our kids Linux?

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: For any parent, myself included, setting your kids loose on the net is a daunting prospect. We have to do it because the net is a fact of life - it's in our schools, the workplace, public libraries and in many if not most homes of the developed world. Therefore, do we really have any option but to give them Linux?

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Why Ubuntu is my Fav
  • Ubuntu 1, Windows 0
  • Mepis Revisited
  • Full Circle Events Calendar
  • Installing Bengali fonts in Gentoo
  • Batch Rename Files and Folders with Métamorphose

Seduced by Sidux

Filed under
Linux

junauza.blogspot: Sidux is a desktop-oriented Linux distribution based on the “unstable” but most modern and up-to-date Debian branch called Sid (from the Toy Story character). The main aim of Sidux is to enhance and stabilize Sid, using its very own packages and scripts to allow a hassle-free use of Debian’s latest and cutting edge software.

Mandriva 2008 VS Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: For those of you that follow my blog, you must have noticed that I’m a Mandriva user. Recently though, I took an interest in Ubuntu: I installed version 7.04 on a laptop, and it did look interesting, enough to make me doubt my commitment to Mandriva’s products.

Feature plans for Fedora 9

Filed under
Linux

liquidat: Fedora 8 has just been released, but of course plans for the next version are already under way: a Fedora 9 Feature List has been created in the Wiki, just like the one for Fedora 8, and people and groups now add their plans and aims.

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today's leftovers

  • DRM display resource leasing (kernel side)
    So, you've got a fine head-mounted display and want to explore the delights of virtual reality. Right now, on Linux, that means getting the window system to cooperate because the window system is the DRM master and holds sole access to all display resources. So, you plug in your device, play with RandR to get it displaying bits from the window system and then carefully configure your VR application to use the whole monitor area and hope that the desktop will actually grant you the boon of page flipping so that you will get reasonable performance and maybe not even experience tearing. Results so far have been mixed, and depend on a lot of pieces working in ways that aren't exactly how they were designed to work.
  • GUADEC accommodation
    At this year’s GUADEC in Manchester we have rooms available for you right at the venue in lovely modern student townhouses. As I write this there are still some available to book along with your registration. In a couple of days we have to a final numbers to the University for how many rooms we want, so it would help us out if all the folk who want a room there could register and book one now if you haven’t already done so! We’ll have some available for later booking but we have to pay up front for them now so we can’t reserve too many.
  • Kickstarter for Niryo One, open source 6-axis 3D printed robotic arm, doubles campaign goal
    A Kickstarter campaign for the Niryo One, an open source 3D printed 6-axis robotic arm, has more than doubled its €20,000 target after just a couple of days. The 3D printed robot is powered by Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Robot Operating System.
  • Linux Action Show to End Eleven Year Run at LFNW
    Jupiter Broadcasting’s long-running podcast, Linux Action Show, will soon be signing off the air…er, fiber cable, for the last time. The show first streamed on June 10, 2006 and was hosted by “Linux Tycoon” Bryan Lunduke and Jupiter Broadcasting founder Chris Fisher. Lunduke left the show in 2012, replaced by Matt Hartley, who served as co-host for about three years. The show is currently hosted by Fisher and Noah Chelliah, president of Altispeed, an open source technology company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

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