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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 31 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story GNOME 3 2.91.90 released srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 5:18pm
Story Linux Mint 10 KDE released srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 5:16pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:48am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:39am
Story Pinguy OS 10.04.2 Screenshots srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:38am
Story One on One with Dries Buytaert of Acquia srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:36am
Story Still Think Linux Is Just for Start-Ups? srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:28am
Story Year of Linux (Unix) srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 6:26am
Story How Movable Type Lost With Open Source srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 3:06am
Story Fedora to include hacking tool Sqlninja after all srlinuxx 23/02/2011 - 3:04am

Novell to Samba: We're Not Terminating MS Agreement

Filed under
SUSE

According to statements from Novell, in Joe 'Zonker' Brockmeier's article in Linux.com, they are not repudiating their Microsoft deal. We also learn that Eben Moglen has finished the audit and is in discussions with Novell, and he says this:

Installing XOOPS

Filed under
HowTos

To install XOOPS for the first time, you'll need to have the minimum following server software pre-installed:

* HTTP Server (Apache or IIS) "Note, XOOPS only officially supports Apache"
* PHP 4.1.0 and higher (4.1.1 or higher recommended)
* MySQL Database 3.23.XX

Installing Nvidia Drivers in Etch

Filed under
HowTos

For some time now the Nvidia drivers have been missing from the Debian Etch repositories. Naturally it is possible to use Nvidia's own installer, however I prefer to avoid bypassing the package management system where possible, and you should too. Because I say so, and I am right.

Five things to know when you switch to Linux

Filed under
Linux

If you have just installed GNU/Linux on your computer, and have only ever used Windows before, here are five things you need to know to get going rapidly.

Gentoo on PS3 Installation Procedure

Filed under
Gentoo
HowTos

there are several things you need to download before you begin. get a usb mass storage device (formatted as fat32) and make a directory called PS3 and inside PS3 make a directory called otheros. put the kboot.bld and the otheros.self files in otheros. it will also be convenient to burn that live cd, and toss the portage tree and stage 3 on the usb mass storage device. you may also want to burn the cell addon disc...

Chris Tyler's Fedora Linux: The Best Book on FC so far!

Filed under
Reviews

Remember what posted ten weeks ago? Review: Two RHEL4 and FC5 Books, Face To Face. It was about Christopher Negus' and Mark G. Sobell's books. Well, unless you're running RHEL4 or CentOS4, you might as well forget about them. Fedora Core users should consider Chris Tyler's book as their first choice. Obviously for a book issued in October 2006, it is dedicated to FC6 only.

Parsix 0.85 Test 3 Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

Parsix GNU/Linux 0.85 Test 3 is now out. New in this third test release is the inclusion of GNOME 2.16.1, OpenOffice.org 2.0.4, Firefox 2.0, and fixed a number of bugs. The final release of Parsix 0.85 should be out in early December. Phoronix has some Screenshots of Test 3.

How To Compile A Kernel - The SuSE Way

Filed under
HowTos

Each distribution has some specific tools to build a custom kernel from the sources. This article is about compiling a kernel on SuSE systems. It describes how to build a custom kernel using the latest unmodified kernel sources from www.kernel.org (vanilla kernel) so that you are independent from the kernels supplied by your distribution. It also shows how to patch the kernel sources if you need features that are not in there.

Backup and Restore Your Ubuntu System using Sbackup

Filed under
HowTos

Data can be lost in different ways some of them are because of hardware failures,you accidentally delete or overwrite a file. Some data loss occurs as a result of natural disasters and other circumstances beyond your control. Now we will see a easy backup and restore tool called “sbackup”

Howto Bypass Ubuntu Login Screen

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

I think many of you who has installed Ubuntu, must hava encountered a login screen before you actually can use the Ubuntu desktop. However there’s a way to enable automatic login to your desktop and completely bypass the login screen.

Open source start-ups speak out

Filed under
OSS

Entrepreneurs attending a recent forum in Germany showed how they plan to use clever open source products — commercially — to compete with proprietary software companies.

Vim Tips & Tricks

Filed under
HowTos

You can execute the vim command, while opening files with vim with option -c. While I wanna replace a string from a huge file, first I need to check whether I can do it with sed or not. That means my replace string must be unique, so that it won’t affect others line thatI might not want to replace.

Racoon Roadwarrior Configuration

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

Racoon Roadwarrior is a client that uses unknown, dynamically assigned IP addresses to connect to a VPN gateway (in this case also firewall). This is one of the most interesting and today most needed scenarios in business environment. This tutorial shows how to configure Racoon Roadwarrior.

http://www.howtoforge.com/racoon_roadwarrior_vpn

Authenticating on the network

Filed under
HowTos

Usually, I get annoyed at having to authenticate myself to each and every service I set up; after all, my passwords are the same everywhere, since I make sure of that myself. On Windows, I wouldn’t have to do that; once I log in, Windows is able to communicate credentials to each and every service that asks for them. But something similar is impossible on GNU/Linux, right? Wrong.

GNOME Interface for YUM: 0.1.5

Filed under
Software

This is the first time for me to hear about gnome-yum, the GNOME interface for YUM, by András Tóth. Version 0.1.5 was just released on Nov. 16, and it doesn't bring much of a change over the older 0.1.2.

Thieves steal thousands from Portland non-profit

Filed under
Misc

Thieves broke into a non-profit that builds computers for people who can't afford them, stealing about $4,500 worth of hardware early Saturday. "Keep an eye out for laptops for sale in Portland loaded with Ubuntu Linux: if you see one of these, please call us! "

how to check the CPU and mem usage of current running process?

Filed under
HowTos

We may curious some times why our computer running so slow, and we suspect that must be some programs (process) is running and uses a lots of CPU. We wanna know which process is it, and we have top. But some how top is not so interactive, where there is another program call htop.

Adventures in a New Ubuntu 6.10 Install: Day 5

Filed under
Ubuntu

Since my last post in this series, I’ve been busy customizing the look and feel of Ubuntu, which I find is the funnest part of using Ubuntu! There are so many options and themes and icons and window borders and wallpapers…

PCLinuxOS - perfect halfway house

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews

It's been quite the dilemma over recent months as to which Linux distro is the best choice for users moving away from XP (or "windoze" as it's affectionately labelled by some in the community). Instinctively the majority of users looked to Ubuntu and the user-friendliness of the gnome environment but it was brought to my attention that there's another major player in this exchange, a plucky little distro called PCLinuxOS, and here are my thoughts on it.

Mandriva Free 2007 - the FOSSwire review

Filed under
MDV
Reviews

I’m going to take a look at the popular Linux distribution Mandriva; more specifically, their latest free-of-charge desktop outing Mandriva Free 2007.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Linux Devices

Leftovers: OSS

  • Quantifying Benefits of Network Virtualization in the Data Center
    Modern data centers have increased significantly in scale and complexity as compute and storage resources become highly virtualized. The rise of the DevOps style of application deployment means that data center resources must be agile and respond rapidly to changing workload requirements. Data center network technologies have been challenged to keep up with these rapidly evolving application requirements.
  • Apache Zeppelin Joins Several Other Projects Gaining Top-Level Status
    As we've been reporting, The Apache Software Foundation, which incubates more than 350 open source projects and initiatives, has been elevating a lot of interesting new tools to Top-Level Status recently. The foundation has also made clear that you can expect more on this front, as graduating projects to Top-Level Status helps them get both advanced stewardship and certainly far more contributions. Only a few days ago, the foundation announced that a project called TinkerPop has graduated from the Apache Incubator to become a Top-Level Project (TLP). TinkerPop is a graph computing framework that provides developers the tools required to build modern graph applications in any application domain and at any scale. Now, it has announced that Apache Zeppelin has graduated as well. Zeppelin is a web-based notebook that enables interactive data analytics.
  • 6 Open Source Operating Systems for the Internet of Things (IoT)
    Whether you are small to large enterprises, IoT is one of the useful technology that can help you to be connected on-the-go.
  • 6 open source architecture projects to check out
    The world of architecture doesn't change as quickly as software, but architects are still finding new ways to share innovative designs and ideas. The open source architecture movement aims to make architectural designs, drawings, 3D renderings, and documentation freely available for integration into other projects under open source licenses. It owes much of its growth to the growing popularity of the maker movement, DIY culture, 3D printing, and CNC machines, as well as support from architects like Alejandro Aravana.
  • Yorubaname.com has gone opensource, codebase now on GitHub
    Online dictionary for yoruba names, YorubaName, has now made its backlog accessible to the public. In a post on their blog, the guys at YorubaName announced that the website codebase is now on GitHub.
  • A New Version of Rust Hits the Streets
    Version 1.9 of the Rust programming language has been released. Rust is a new language with a small but enthusiastic community of developers.
  • Here's how you can make a career in OpenStack
    OpenStack is one of the biggest open source movements. It is a free and open-source software platform for cloud computing, mostly deployed as an infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS). The software platform consists of interrelated components that control hardware pools of processing, storage, and networking resources throughout a data centre. According to the official website, hundreds of the world's largest brands rely on OpenStack to run their businesses every day, reducing costs and helping them move faster. OpenStack has a strong ecosystem globally.
  • Compatibility before purity: Microsoft tweaks .NET Core again [Ed: Microsoft lied about .NET going Open Source; just forked it into Open Core version]
    Microsoft's open source fork of the .NET platform, called .NET Core, will be modified for better compatibility with existing applications, says Program Manager Immo Landwerth in a recent post.
  • EMC Ships Open Source Tool for Cloud and IoT Devices
  • Watch Benjamin Hindman Co-Creator of Apache Mesos Speak Live Tomorrow at MesosCon [Ed: Microsoft proxy in a sense]
  • MesosCon Preview: Q&A with Twitter’s Chris Pinkham
  • How to secure your open source code [Ed: more marketing nonsense of Black Duck]
  • Luxembourg launches open data portal
    The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg officially launched its national open data portal data.public.lu on April 8th. This portal, supported by Digital Luxembourg, the government agency in charge of digital affairs in the country, was presented during the Game of Code hackathon.
  • Denmark to accelerate government digitisation
    Open standards The existing shared solutions are to be adopted by all authorities and public sector institutions where relevant, according to a presentation in English. “Shared solutions need to be stable, secure and user-friendly, they will also be easy to implement because the infrastructure is based on open standards.” The strategy, an agreement involving the government, regions and municipalities, was announced on 12 May. It includes 33 initiatives, which among other things deal with ease of use, reuse of data, IT architecture, growth, security and digital skills, DIGST says.

Licensing and Coding

  • The Oracle v. Google Suit is Still an Anti-Open Move That Shouldn't Have Happened
    All the way back in 2010, when Oracle filed a complaint for patent and copyright infringement against Google regarding parts of the Java code found in Google's Android mobile OS, I wrote a post calling the move "the anti-open move of the year." Fast-forward to today, and in the Oracle v. Google trial that just concluded, a jury returned a verdict in Google's favor. It basically concluded that Oracle's suit against Google, claiming that the use of Java APIs in Android violated copyright law, was bunk. Now, in an op-ed piece for Ars Technica, Annette Hurst, an attorney who represented Oracle, equates the jury's decision with the death of open source. [...] Hurst makes a good point that dual licensing models are increasing, with many open source projects available for free, while commercial versions, often including support, come at a cost. But the Oracle suit originated because Oracle essentially perceived itself as owning a moat around Java that didn't really exist. [...] Indeed, one of the lasting images of this long running legal skirmish is going to be Oracle behaving in a decidedly anti-open fashion. It may have been wiser for Oracle to simply let this one go.
  • Here’s how to check if software license is open source
    The Open Source Initiative (OSI), the steward of the Open Source Definition (OSD), announced today it has created a machine readable publication of OSI approved licenses. According to the Initiative, the API will allow third parties to ‘become license-aware’, giving businesses everywhere means to determine if a license is Open Source or not.
  • 3 Things Infrastructure as Code is Not
    The role of the network engineer is changing. This is not a result of DevOps, although some would claim it is. As DevOps takes center stage in organizations, it can seem like network engineers are being asked to become developers. There have been a number of talks discussing this, some of which have surfaced at Interop Las Vegas. The shift has been Infrastructure as Code (IaC), which was fundamental to the start of the DevOps movement. So maybe you could say this is caused by DevOps.
  • Introducing Blue Ocean: a new user experience for Jenkins
    While this project is in the alpha stage of development, the intent is that Jenkins users can install Blue Ocean side-by-side with the Jenkins Classic UI via a plugin. Not all the features listed on this blog are complete but we will be hard at work over the next few months preparing Blue Ocean for general use. We intend to provide regular updates on this blog as progress is made. Blue Ocean is open source today and we invite you to give us feedback and to contribute to the project.