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About Tux Machines

Friday, 16 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Kodi from Debian Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 2:01pm
Story GoldKey's Secure Smartwatch Runs Full-Fledged Android Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 1:50pm
Story Samsung to work with MediaTek to expand the Tizen ecosystem Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 1:37pm
Story Red Hat Foresees Sprawling Cloud, Container Specs in 2015 Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 1:35pm
Story Twitter AnomalyDetection tool goes open source Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 1:23pm
Story Fluxbox 1.3.6 Released After Two-Year Wait Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 1:17pm
Story Alpine Linux 3.1.1 released Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 1:09pm
Story 5 of the Best Smartwatches of 2014 Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 1:04pm
Story 2015: To Ensure an Open Cloud, IT History has to Repeat Itself Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 12:21pm
Story Open Source Software List: 2015 Ultimate List Roy Schestowitz 07/01/2015 - 12:19pm

Perl 5.8.9 released

Filed under
Software Perl 5.8.9 has been released as the latest and probably last significant release of the Perl 5.8 series. Future releases of the Perl 5.8 series are expected to only deal with security and platform build issues.

The HeHe2-ness Holiday Linux Gift Guide 2008

Filed under
Linux Doing some shopping for your technical friends this year? Or just following the Golden Rule of Giving? That is, Give Something That You Yourself Would Like In Case They Don’t Get Around To Using It. Either way, we’ve shifted through a wide range of gifts to come up with suggestions and ideas in hopes that we can help you expand your range of gift giving.

Open source isn't free software

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blogs.computerworld: There's a long standing argument over the differences between "open-source" software and "free software. But, a more common error outside of software ideology circles is that you can use open-source software anyway you please. Nope. Wrong.

A Readers Digest History of Linux

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Linux Linux as we know it was developed in 1991 by Linux Torvalds based upon the GNU code written by, or at least announced by, Richard Stallman in 1983. Just knowing that dispels the myth that Linux is based upon Unix as GNU stands for “Gnu is Not Unix.” This often leads to the use of the term GNU/LINUX.

The OpenSuse FAQ touched me in a bad place

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meandubuntu.wordpress: Today, I was reading Slashdot coverage on the new release of OpenSUSE. Surfing from there led me from one place to another, eventually ending up on the OpenSUSE FAQ:Novell-MS. There was a particular statement that bothered me enough to make this blog entry.

Going Loco Over the Ubuntu Logo

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Ubuntu Ubuntu is undoubtedly the most popular Linux distribution at the moment. It has millions of passionate users and tons of dynamic community members that can prove it. Let the following images that I’m going to show to you illustrate this phenomenon.

Amarok2.0 Part Two: Continued failure

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Software First thing I saw is that Amarok couldn't playback files but didn't give me any error message. After some thinking I remembered that Ubuntu doesn't install codecs by default but Amarok just silently failed.

Open-source Software Security Vendor Praises 25 Projects

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OSS (IDG): Palamida, a vendor that sells software and services around open-source software security and legal compliance, has named 25 open-source projects companies should not hesitate to use.

What’s new in Linux Mint 6 Felicia?

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Linux Based on Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, Linux 2.6.27, Gnome 2.24 and Xorg 7.4, Linux Mint 6 “Felicia” comes with a brand new “Software Manager”, FTP support in mintUpload, proxy support and history of updates in mintUpdate, mint4win (a Linux Mint installer for Microsoft Windows), tabbed browsing in Nautilus and a lot of other improvements.

today's leftovers

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  • Metro 1.2 Released

  • tor2web brings anonymous Tor sites to the "regular" web
  • My Netbook Took Me Back To Windows
  • ASUS Eee PC 1000HA Netbook
  • The LTSP adds thin-client support to a Linux server
  • Semantic Sense for the Desktop
  • Bringing WINE Into Ubuntu Main
  • 7 Free Open Source Video Editors For Linux
  • Switching to KDE
  • Giving KDE a second chance
  • Intel 2.6 RC1 X.Org Driver Brings DRI2, XvMC
  • Back to Windows
  • Can Wine make Ubuntu better for Ed Tech?
  • Ubuntu EEE's New Name
  • OpenSUSE Linux 11.1 Fans are Jumping the Gun
  • One Linux to Rule Them All?
  • Linux Outlaws 68 - The Episode of the Beast

some howtos:

Filed under
  • Five Firefox Shortcuts You Need to Learn Right Now

  • Managing startup services
  • Monitor your server with Monitorix
  • Converting JPG Files to PDF
  • Condensing with Open Text Summarizer
  • Video Tutorial - Sync Sunbird with Google Calendar
  • Basic features of GIMP
  • Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part II: repeat.vim
  • How to create and extract zip, tar, tar.gz and tar.bz2 files in Linux

Care for some WINE?

Ah the taste of victory. It is sweet. Smile Especially if it is an immense victory over Microsoft.

Market Share of Operating Systems

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Linux This chart displays the approximate market share of Windows, Mac, and each of the 312 active Linux distributions as of December 15, 2008. Market share for each of the three major operating systems (Windows, Mac, and Linux) was taken from HitsLink, and is based on data from November 2008.

Novell gets a new/old Linux chief

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SUSE Markus Rex, formerly the CTO of SUSE and currently on leave from Novell, is back in the saddle as acting general manager and senior vice president of Novell's Open Platform Solutions business unit.

IBM Sees Linux on Netbooks Making Inroads Vs. Windows in 2009

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Linux Linux and open source will start to chip away at Microsoft Windows desktop software thanks to their popularity on netbooks, those ultralight, low-cost laptops. IBM Lotus strategy director predicts this as a major trend in 2009.

From Linux to Windows: Is This 2009 Downgrade Really Necessary?

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Linux While speaking recently with one of my bosses, I was told I will receive a new business laptop in 2009. Now, for the problem: It will be running Windows Vista or Windows XP. Hooray for new gear. Boo for Luddite attitudes.

It is alright to be just a Linux user

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Linux Being a GNU/Linux user is a peculiar thing in that you stand a great chance of being pulled into such hard to define brackets such as "Linux community", "Free Software community" or "Open Source community".

Debian women may leave due to 'sexist' post

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Linux At least two Debian women developers are reconsidering their participation in the GNU/Linux project following the posting of what they deem to be a sexist message to one of the mailing lists meant for developers.

The Range of Linux Distributions

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Linux A comment from Tezzer to my recent blog post about Two New Linux Beta Distributions got me thinking. Tezzer mentions using Debian, but looking at PCLinuxOS and others for systems that have "issues" with some Linux distributions.

The lizard roars: openSUSE 11.1 coming this week

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SUSE openSUSE 11.1, the next major version of the company's community-driven Linux distribution, is scheduled for release on December 17. The new version will include updated software and some important new features that enhance the quality of the distribution.

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More in Tux Machines

SwagArch 18.02 - U Got Swag?

SwagArch sounds like an interesting concept. The aesthetic side of things is reasonable, although brown as a color and a dark theme make for a tricky choice. The fonts are pretty good overall. But the visual element is the least of the distro's problems. SwagArch 18.02 didn't deliver the basics, and that's what made Dedoimedo sad. Network support plus the clock issue, horrible package management and broken programs, those are things that must work perfectly. Without them, the system has no value. So you do get multimedia support and a few unique apps, however that cannot balance out all the woes and problems that I encountered. All in all, Swag needs a lot more work. Also, it will have a tough time competing with Manjaro and Antergos, which are already established and fairly robust Arch spins. Lastly, it needs to narrow down its focus. The overall integration of elements is pretty weak. Eclectic, jumbled, not really tested. 2/10 for now. Let's see how it evolves. Read more

How Open Source Approach is Impacting Science

Dive into the exciting world of Innovative Science to explore and find out about how the Linux-based Operating System and Open Source are playing a significant role in the major scientific breakthroughs that are taking place in our daily lives. Read more

Programming: Developer Survey, Code That Unmasks, Retaining Newcomers

  • Developers love trendy new languages but earn more with functional programming
    Developer Q&A site Stack Overflow performs an annual survey to find out more about the programmer community, and the latest set of results has just been published.
  • FYI: AI tools can unmask anonymous coders from their binary executables [Ed: Just a kind reminder that if you are e using Microsoft's tools compile source code, there will be surveillance and telemetry in your compiled code]
    Programmers can be potentially identified from the low-level machine-code instructions in their software executables by AI-powered tools. That's according to boffins from Princeton University, Shiftleft, Drexel University, Sophos, and Braunschweig University of Technology, who have described how stylometry can be applied to binary files. That's kinda bad news for people who wish to develop software, such as privacy-protecting apps, anonymously, as this technology can be used to potentially unmask them. It's also kinda good news for crimefighters trying to identify malware authors.
  • How to avoid humiliating newcomers: A guide for advanced developers
    Every year in New York City, a few thousand young men come to town, dress up like Santa Claus, and do a pub crawl. One year during this SantaCon event, I was walking on the sidewalk and minding my own business, when I saw an extraordinary scene. There was a man dressed up in a red hat and red jacket, and he was talking to a homeless man who was sitting in a wheelchair. The homeless man asked Santa Claus, "Can you spare some change?" Santa dug into his pocket and brought out a $5 bill. He hesitated, then gave it to the homeless man. The homeless man put the bill in his pocket. In an instant, something went wrong. Santa yelled at the homeless man, "I gave you $5. I wanted to give you one dollar, but five is the smallest I had, so you oughtta be grateful. This is your lucky day, man. You should at least say thank you!" [...] I still get angry at people on the internet. It happened to me recently, when someone posted a comment on a video I published about Python co-routines. It had taken me months of research and preparation to create this video, and then a newcomer commented, "I want to master python what should I do."

Software: 5 Online Backup Solutions, Lector, Roundcube

  • 5 Online Backup Solutions for Ubuntu Linux
    As the digital age progresses, the amount of data we produce each year is snowballing. There was a time when we could fit all of our personal digital data on a few floppy disks, but many of us now have hundreds of gigabytes, or even terabytes, of photos, videos, music, and documents that we need to backup and protect. Backing up our data locally is essential, but any good backup plan should also include off-site backups. “The Cloud” has promised us unlimited, cheap storage where we can save our ever-growing data. Online cloud backups should be a part of your overall backup plan, but it’s crucial that your data is secure, encrypted, and backed up automatically. Here are a few online backup tools that aim to make cloud backups easy for desktop Linux users.
  • This Qt eBook App for Linux is a Real Page Turner
    Lector a new open-source Qt-based ebook app for Linux desktops. It supports most common DRM-free ebook files, including EPUB, MOBI, and AZW, as well as comic book files in the CBZ or CBR format. In both visuals and in features Lector is something of a page-turner; a desktop ebook reader you can absolutely judge by its cover. So join me as I take a closer look at its features.
  • Roundcube fr_FEM locale 1.3.5
    Roundcube 1.3.5 was released today and with it, I've released version 1.3.5 of my fr_FEM (French gender-neutral) locale. This latest version is actually the first one that can be used with a production version of Roundcube: the first versions I released were based on the latest commit in the master branch at the time instead of an actual release. Not sure why I did that.